Samsung SDI Announced Next Generation Battery For 600 km (373 Mile) BEVs, Rechargeable In 20 Minutes!

2 weeks ago by Mark Kane 63

9th of January, 2017 in COBO Center, Detroit. Samsung SDI introduced in its customer exhibition a "high-energy density battery cell of the next generation for a driving range of up to 600km that can fast charge EVs in 20 minutes" as well as an "integrated battery module" concept with a 10% decrease in component units and weight compared to the currently produced models.

9th of January, 2017 in COBO Center, Detroit. Samsung SDI introduced in its customer exhibition a “high-energy density battery cell of the next generation for a driving range of up to 600km that can fast charge EVs in 20 minutes” as well as an “integrated battery module” concept with a 10% decrease in component units and weight compared to the currently produced models.

Lucid Air

Lucid Air

Samsung SDI presented in Detroit at the 2017 NAIAS several battery innovations for electric cars.

The major reveal is the next generation lithium-ion cells with both high energy density for 600 km (373 mi) of range in an all-electric car and high power density for 20-minute recharge (80%).

The drawback is that Samsung SDI expects mass production of these cells in 2021. Well… it seems we will have couple years to enjoy 200+ miles BEVs first then before ICE vehicles will finally be crushed by electric cars equipped with these new cells.

“These innovations are expected to forge the leading position of Samsung SDI in the era of electro mobility. The development of the fast charging technology is making a rapid advancement thanks to its technological know-how in materials and processes that vastly decreased the resistance inside a battery cell. With a 20min charge, you can have a driving range of up to 500km which is 80% of the capacity. This means that only 20min in the highway rest area will be enough for a battery to be charged, eliminating the range anxiety of EV drivers. The mass production of this product is slated for 2021.”

The second Samsung SDI product is advanced “integrated battery module” with a 10% decrease in component units and weight compared to the currently produced models.

“In addition, Samsung SDI exhibited a brand-new concept, “integrated battery module” catching the eye of its visitors. A conventional EV battery module which consists of 12 cells has a capacity of 2~3kWh. By contrast, an “integrated battery module” has more than 24 cells with a higher capacity of 6~8kWh, which makes it an adequate module in the full-fledged high-capacity EV era.

The integrated battery module is not only larger in size but shows a higher safety level because the advanced electro-mechanical design has been applied. This concept is expected to be a boon in the electro mobility, as it will be lighter with fewer components. We are increasingly witnessing a change in many automakers’ sourcing strategy from battery cells to modules in the EV sector; thus, Samsung SDI is expecting a rising customers’ demand in the integrated battery modules.”

Tesla Gigafactory 2170 cells

Tesla Gigafactory 2170 cells

Samsung SDI (like Tesla with Panasonic) is also readying for “21700cylindrical battery cells (Lucid Motors will be among first customers we bet), which are 21 mm in diameter and 70 mm in length.

“The “21700” cylindrical battery cell model with the improved energy density, power and performance was also exhibited by Samsung SDI. This is the technology which is attracting more focus as U.S. automobile startups are adopting this technology in their EVs.”

In 2016, Samsung SDI began construction of its third battery factory – in Europe, which makes us wonder whether there is a chance for a North American facility in the future.

“Samsung SDI initiated the construction of an automotive battery factory located in Hungary in August of last year, forming a triangular global operation: Korea, China and Europe. Based on this localization strategy, the plan is to actively respond to the diverse requirements of global automakers by supplying the cutting-edge automotive batteries and LVS solutions in the proximity.”

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63 responses to "Samsung SDI Announced Next Generation Battery For 600 km (373 Mile) BEVs, Rechargeable In 20 Minutes!"

  1. DNAinaGoodWay says:

    Why 2021?

    1. cmina says:

      Well, Tesla and Panasonic didn’t do it over night either ..

    2. Yogurt says:

      Because it is obviously vaporware…
      😉

      1. JIMJFOX says:

        Obviously. Because you are the expert and authority on batteries?

    3. Samwise says:

      Can you imagine the testing and regulatory requirements of putting ANYTHING in a car, especially in the US.
      Nothing important that gets put in an automobile can be done quickly.
      On top of that unless you just want to make a massive bet on the number of customers you probably don’t start tooling up until you have at least a couple of probable buyers.

  2. cmina says:

    The 2170 “design” must have something really good going for it if Samsung is also going to mass produce it.
    The more, the merrier!

    1. Alonso Perez says:

      Of course it has something really good: A large scale customer. If the Model III (and platform derivatives) is a hit, the gating for ramp to really high production numbers is the Gigafactory. It will max out at 500K cars or so, especially if sales of stationary storage packs also take off.

  3. Sch says:

    What they say is 80% charge good for up to 500km in 20 minutes. If the EV had a economy of up to 12kWh/100km (NEDC) that makes 60kWh in 20 minutes or a charging power of 180kW.

  4. tosho says:

    Just noticing the bolded “2021” is enough to konw that reading this would be a total waste of time.

    1. JIMJFOX says:

      Then DON’T read it!

  5. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

    I think it’s really worth taking Note of this announcement.

    :p

    1. Sublime says:

      Samsung has really been on fire with these battery developments. I expect explosive growth with this new cell.

      1. Akovia says:

        Hahahahaha!

      2. Jack says:

        I see what you did there…

  6. vadik says:

    So, exactly how many kwh per kg, litre? Otherwise it is just marketing smoke.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      If they’re claiming an 80% charge in 20 minutes, then they’re claiming high power density cells, not high energy density cells.

  7. Someone out there says:

    Very nice! 2021 is unfortunate but I think more things are in the pipeline both at Samsung and other manufacturers so I’m sure we’ll see many more of these announcements before 2021. This only strenghtens my belief that by 2022-2025, 300+ mile cars will be the norm and they will be priced equally to gas cars. That will in effect completely obsolete the gas car and by 2030 nobody will want to buy a gas car.

    1. Loboc says:

      Tony Seba (futurist) recently re-did his prior estimate of 2030 for same-price EVs to 2025. I think you’re in the ball park here.

    2. arne-nl says:

      “This only strenghtens my belief that by 2022-2025, 300+ mile cars will be the norm and they will be priced equally to gas cars. That will in effect completely obsolete the gas car and by 2030 nobody will want to buy a gas car.”

      Slight correction: “and by 2022 nobody will want to buy a gas car”

      Buying a new car is a long term decision. As soon as people realize the days of the explosion motor are counted and start having doubts about the resale value, they’ll choose something safe: the EV.

      1. Someone out there says:

        Mass acceptance probably has started by then but I do think it will take to the late 2020’s before people give up on gas completely. There are always a couple of stragglers that just refuse to go with the times.

        1. Someone else says:

          It will take that long because first they have to make the cars cost competitive to gas cars. Once that is on the horizon THEN they will build the infrastructure, charging stations, EV battery replacement facilities etc. And don’t think the Exxon’s and others won’t put in their own subsidies to slow things down for EV.

  8. JeffD says:

    So when they say rechargeable in 20 min, are they meaning with current charging abilities or where they figure it will be by 2021?

    1. James Cooke says:

      I’m pretty sure they mean the cells can take an 80% charge in 20 minutes without damage (providing the power is available to charge at that rate).

      1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        Right. This isn’t predicting that public EV chargers running at 180 kWh will be commonplace by then; they’re just claiming that they’ll be able to build a battery pack which can be charged that fast.

        But given the high volume of claims for breakthrough battery tech which ever appear in mass produced cells, don’t hold your breath on this claim.

        “Talk is super cheap; the battery industry has to have more B.S. in it than any industry I’ve ever encountered. It’s insane.” — Elon Musk, Nov. 5, 2014

  9. Seth says:

    The range adds no useful information to the press release.

    What they meant to say was “We have a cell that allows for a maximum 2.4C charge rate”

    The older BMW i3 had 2.2C (with 50kW DCFC) which is about right.

  10. CDAVIS says:

    Translation:

    Dear Samsung SDI Customers,
    We here at Samsung SDI acknowledge that we need to catch up with Tesla/Panasonic Gigafactory to remain competitive in the EV battery space and are committed to do so by 2021…these things take time…please hang in there with us untill then. – Sincerely, Samsung SDI

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      By George, I think he’s got it. 🙂

    2. Someone else says:

      Rumor here in Korea is the Samsung owner isnt even interested in SDI and wants to sell it off. Not to mention the real number one in EV battery technology globally is LG Chem.

      1. CDAVIS says:

        @Someone els said: “…rumor is… Samsung owner isnt even interested in SDI …”
        ——–

        That rumor does not square with Samsung making additional $1B+ investment in SDI.

  11. Durkle says:

    Some assumptions made here, but this looks like it averages out to about 2.4 C charge rate over the 20 minutes, which doesn’t seem super impressive, though I’m not sure what they’re current BEV format cells accept. Still progress, though!

    Assumptions: 500 km at 80% SOC gives 388 miles of range total, 333 wh/mi gives a 130 kWh pack, means 103 kW charged in 20 minutes, gives an average charge rate of 310 kW (assuming the DCFC station can provide that), assuming 400V gives 776 amps at 310 kW, next big leap is that this figure is for their 65Ah cell on the board there (the 75 didn’t work out to a nice round number of cells in parallel… which could mean they have some other pack voltage or any number of other assumptions!), which at 400V, 130 kWh gives 5 cells in parallel for 325 Ah pack, which gives 776/325 = 2.4C.

    1. Durkle says:

      33 kWh BMW i3 (with Samsung cells I believe) charges at 125 amps, which gives 1.33 C, so this does seem to be a substantial upgrade (though on a smaller cell capacity example, the 65Ah instead of 94Ah series, they’re different sizes too, but just something to compare)

    2. Ahldor says:

      There is no way they are sticking with 400V for 150kW+. There will be a jump to 800V and maybe even 1000V before we see such high charging rates. The amps need to be mastered.

  12. Alan says:

    VW group, BMW & Daimler are all switching to these batteries I gather !

  13. leafowner says:

    And every new battery pack cones with a Note 7 smartphone!

  14. Kdawg says:

    “The second Samsung SDI product is advanced “integrated battery module” with a 10% decrease in component units and weight compared to the currently produced models.”
    ———-
    I assume this also brought costs down?

  15. fasterthanonecanimagine says:

    Please help me to understand:

    Quote from above “By contrast, an “integrated battery module” has more than 24 cells with a higher capacity of 6~8kWh”

    Is the package the lady on the picture is holding in her hand such a module with 6-8 kWh?

    Then 2 such little boxes provide more storage capacity than the Prius Prime has (I remember 8.8 kWh)?

    Then why doesn’t a Prius Prime not just be equipped with 5 or 10 of those little boxes instead of a lousy 8.8 kwh battery?

    I’m afraid, I’m getting it wrong, because it reads too good to be true?

    1. buu says:

      1 kWh current Tesla cells weights about 4 kg, lets assume new ones will be 3 kg. Do you think this women can easily hold 20kg between fingers?

      1. Alan says:

        Her husband says she can !

      2. fasterthanonecanimagine says:

        You are right, 2 such boxes (12-16 kWh) would equal a Tesla Powerwall 2.0.
        Possibly their numbers a wrong by a factor of ten. Anyway.

    2. Sublime says:

      If you click on the picture there is a higher res view. On the table behind her is something about the size she is holding labelled “cell” and a big black box labelled “module for light EV”.

      That module looks to hold 27 or 36 cells (a multiple of 9 cells).

    3. Doggydogworld says:

      Those are prismatic cells. 24 cells in their new 6 kWh module. 10 modules for a Bolt-size 60 kWh pack.

    4. fasterthanonecanimagine says:

      Thank you!

  16. Nix says:

    “We are increasingly witnessing a change in many automakers’ sourcing strategy from battery cells to modules in the EV sector”

    Interesting. Tesla seems to be going the completely opposite direction. Heck, I wouldn’t be surprised if Tesla started mining their own Lithium with their trend toward doing their own manufacturing and owning their own sales and repair network.

    I can see the benefit for ICE car makers who don’t really want to get into heavy R&D, and just want somebody else to solve the problem.

    If it moves the EV movement forward, good for them. But as somebody else mentioned earlier, this also sort of reminds me of Kodak missing opportunity after opportunity to break into the digital market. It seems like the ICE car companies who have done years of research would want to capitalize on all their research and build their own EV drivetrains. Instead they seem happy to phone it in, and have suppliers supply them with drivetrain components that the suppliers are busy trying to commoditize.

    I can see advantages and disadvantages to both approaches.

    1. ClarksonCote says:

      And regarding Kodak… ironically, they were even the inventors of the digital camera.

  17. Terawatt says:

    > The integrated battery module is not only larger in size but shows a higher safety level because the advanced electro-mechanical design has been applied.

    I frankly would expect their techno-babble to be better than this! Besides being devoid of any informational content, this doesn’t even work from a grammatical point of view…

    I’m sure they’ve got some great product in the pipeline though. As do the competition. VW and BMW seem to like the combination of pretty high (but not optimal) energy density and pretty high (but not optimal) power density, since their strategy is to use the same modules in PHEVs and BEVs to minimize cost.

    I still think forgetting about PHEVs and optimizing for BEV is the better route. PHEVs don’t come close to BEVs in real world impact and I think they will be just an expensive stepping stone to full electrification. LG and Tesla/Panasonic will continue to beat Samsung SDI on energy density since they can sacrifice a little power density. And if they want to go maximum plaid, combine with a supercapacitor instead..! 😁

    1. HVACman says:

      Voltstats shows that Gen 1 Volts average over 100 mpg and 71% EV driving and Gen 2 Volts average over 166 mpg and 77% EV driving. Seems that PHEV’s, at least at the Volt level of performance, have the potential to make a HUGE impact on petroleum use compared to the current fleet of ICE vehicles and do it anywhere in the country right now without any public charging infrastructure required. PHEV’s will also adapt to any type of vehicle, including trucks, service vans, etc. with a fraction of the battery kWh required. When the CT6 Voltec RWD transmission and battery pack shows up in a Silverado, that will be when PHEV’s really grow up.

      1. Tom says:

        Absolutely. Given these stats the focus on pure EVs is a little mysterious.

        The only downside to the current Voltec systems is slow charging. If it had a DC charger that allowed for a 80% charge in 10 minutes, then apartment and condo dwellers could charge off site. Otherwise, the Voltec system is only appropriate for single resident dwellings with garages.

        Of course, if apartment buildings and condos routinely included on site 240 volt charging then the current Voltec system would be fine, but this removes one of its advantages, which is that it doesn’t require substantial changes to existing infrastructure.

  18. Hauer says:

    2021?

    Couldn’t care less.

  19. Phaedrus says:

    I hope we will have zeropoint energy in 2021. Nikolai Tesla drove a car many decades ago for hours, without any battery or engine. Just an antenna and a “black box” containing some electronics. The patent bureau witnesses of that time could not detect any fraud so the car’s technology was patented. Then after some time the patents content dissappeared.. Time for a next try if you ask me… maybe by Tesla?
    (and yes I wear a tin hat 😉

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      “The patent bureau witnesses of that time could not detect any fraud so the car’s technology was patented.”

      That has never been how the patent process works.

      Whatever fringe science or “FREE ENERGY!!” website you read this B.S. on… you need to stop reading. Don’t believe everything you read, especially on the Internet.

    2. Someone out there says:

      There is no such thing as free energy. If the technology you speak of were in fact patented then it should be available as a public record. Not only that, if Nicola Tesla used it the patent protection should be expired long ago so it would be free for anyone to use. Funny though how nobody is, isn’t it?

  20. JIMJFOX says:

    http://www.edisontechcenter.org/tesladebunked.html . No shortage of nutjobs, even highly intelligent ones.
    “Then after some time the patents content dissappeared”– OH, how CONVENIENT!

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      It is truly amazing how many people, even apparently somewhat educated people, that “FREE ENERGY!!” claims take in. We had the same thing over on the now-defunct TheEEStory forum, with many people insisting that the “E-Cat” LENR (Low Energy Nuclear Reactor) was not a scam, despite any number of rather large red flags.

      Even highly intelligent, educated people can deceive themselves with wishful thinking.
      I suppose we should be thankful that this sort of thing isn’t seen more often on InsideEVs.

      1. Someone out there says:

        Yeah the e-cat keeps popping up every now and then. It’s funny how absolutely nothing has materialized from the Rossi team since the demonstration in 2011. Normally, once you have a working device you want to commercialize it as soon as possible to start raking in the cash but there has been absolutely no substantial effort towards that in more than 5 years. Wonder why…

  21. spice says:

    So next we might see (as battery technology improves) is perhaps BEV manufacturers featuring more easily exchangeable batteries/cells? And will the electric motors also show marked efficiency increases?

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      No, we won’t see electric motors with significantly improved efficiency. Mass produced electric motors are already up to 91-2% efficient, so very little room for improvement.

      There may be some room for improvement in the power electronics, which includes the inverter. As I understand it, Tesla has managed to measurably improve the efficiency of their inverters over the years.

  22. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    “Samsung SDI (like Tesla with Panasonic) is ‘…also readying for ‘21700’ cylindrical battery cells (Lucid Motors will be among first customers we bet), which are 21 mm in diameter and 70 mm in length’.”

    Well, that answers that question. Yes, other battery cell manufacturers will copy the 21-70 form factor of the Tesla/Panasonic Gigafactory cell.

    “The drawback is that Samsung SDI expects mass production of these cells in 2021.”

    Hmmm. When a company says they expect something in five years, that essentially means they hope to develop it someday, but there are no firm plans. This stated goal is four years out, but we’re at the very beginning of a year, so is this really the nebulous 5-year plan expressed as 4 years? Or does Samsung actually have a firm plan to start making these in 2021? Unfortunately, we’ll almost certainly have to wait at least a couple of years to find out.

    As always, it’s best to be extremely skeptical of an claims from battery makers, unless they’re actually talking about writing contracts for delivery. It was LG Chem doing exactly that a couple of years, regarding what they said was a “200 mile battery”, which made it clear that LG really did have something new.

    1. Someone out there says:

      “Yes, other battery cell manufacturers will copy the 21-70 form factor of the Tesla/Panasonic Gigafactory cell.”

      The 21700 form factor was designed by Samsung so it’s Tesla who is the copycat here.

      1. Someone else says:

        Both Tesla and SDI’s cylinder batteries are old technology / inferior to LG Chem’s pouch type battery.

        1. floydboy says:

          Inferior in what way?

  23. Jeff says:

    You guys all do realize that SDI made the same batteries which were exploding in the Samsung Note 7. Nobody is going to want that in their cars.

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