Power Japan Plus Reveals Dual Carbon Battery Technology

3 years ago by Mark Kane 15

Power Japan Plus team

Power Japan Plus team

Power Japan Plus's 18650 Ryden cells

Power Japan Plus’s 18650 Ryden cells

Last week, battery start-up Power Japan Plus hit the stage with an announcement of a new battery design developed in partnership with Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan.

It is called Ryden dual carbon battery and is rather strange because both the cathode and the anode are made of the same material – carbon.  Such a setup can’t work like a typical battery without some third element and in this particular design this third element is electrolyte, which acts as charge carrier and active material.

Energy density of Power Japan Plus cells is, according to press release, comparable to a lithium ion battery, so this will not be the breakthrough to the long range EV.  Furthermore, we don’t know if this means 100 or 200 Wh/kg or whatever, because it’s not specified and the difference can be rather large.

But the Japanese company claims that Ryden cells have other benefits with over 3,000 charge/discharge cycles and 20 times faster charging (of course, without setting a reference point).

Without technical specifications, we can’t say too much, but we can add this company to the radar if there is more news coming.  Pilot production of 18650 Ryden cells will start later this year and Power Japan Plus plans to eventually sell its license to battery manufacturers, which means that there are at least several years before potential commercialization.

“The company owns a battery production facility in Okinawa, Japan, where it will begin bench production testing of 18650 Ryden cells later this year. This facility will allow Power Japan Plus to meet demand for specialty energy storage markets such as medical devices and satellites.

For larger demand industries such as electric vehicles, Power Japan Plus will operate under a licensing business model, providing technology and expertise to existing battery manufacturers to produce the dual carbon battery.”

Those interested in the new technology could find Power Japan Plus at the Electric Drive Transportation Association Conference & Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana on May 20-21, 2014 (at booth #112).

Here we have the press release from Power Japan Plus and the video presenting the concept:

 

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. — May 13, 2014 — Power Japan Plus today launched a new battery technology – the Ryden dual carbon battery. This unique battery offers energy density comparable to a lithium ion battery, but over a much longer functional lifetime with drastically improved safety and cradle-to-cradle sustainability. The Ryden battery makes use of a completely unique chemistry, with both the anode and the cathode made of carbon.

Power Japan Plus today launched a new battery technology – the Ryden dual carbon battery. This unique battery offers energy density comparable to a lithium ion battery, but over a much longer functional lifetime with drastically improved safety and cradle-to-cradle sustainability. The Ryden battery makes use of a completely unique chemistry, with both the anode and the cathode made of carbon.

“Power Japan Plus is a materials engineer for a new class of carbon material that balances economics, performance and sustainability in a world of constrained resources,” said Dou Kani, CEO of Power Japan Plus. “The Ryden dual carbon battery is the energy storage breakthrough needed to bring green technology like electric vehicles to mass market.”

The Ryden battery balances a breadth of consumer demands previously unattainable by single battery chemistry, including performance, cost, reliability, safety and sustainability.

➢ High Performance – energy dense and charges 20 times faster than lithium ion batteries. It is also more powerful than other advanced batteries, operating above four volts.

➢ Cost Competitive – slots directly into existing manufacturing processes, requiring no change to existing manufacturing lines. Even more, the battery allows for consolidation of the supply chain, with only one active material — carbon. Additionally, manufacturing of the Ryden battery is under no threat of supply disruption or price spikes from rare metals, rare earth or heavy metals.

➢ Reliable – first ever high performance battery that meets consumer lifecycle demand, rated for more than 3,000 charge/discharge cycles.

➢ Safe – safest high performance battery chemistry ever developed. The Ryden battery eliminates the unstable active material used in other high performance batteries, greatly reducing fire and explosion hazard. Even more, the battery experiences minimal thermal change during operation, eliminating the threat of a thermal runaway. Finally, the Ryden battery can be 100 percent charged and discharged with no damage to the battery.

➢ Sustainable – contains no rare metals, rare earth metals or heavy metals, and is 100 percent recyclable, vastly improving the cradle-to-cradle sustainability of an advanced battery. Even further, Power Japan Plus is testing the Ryden battery with its organic Carbon Complex material, working towards the goal of producing the battery with all organic carbon in the future.

“Current advanced batteries have made great improvement on performance, but have done so by compromising on cost, reliability and safety,” said Dr. Kaname Takeya, CTO of Power Japan Plus. “The Ryden dual carbon battery balances this equation, excelling in each category.”

Path to Market
Power Japan Plus will begin benchmark production of 18650 Ryden cells later this year at the company’s production facility in Okinawa, Japan. This facility will allow the company to meet demand for specialty energy storage markets such as medical devices and satellites. For larger demand industries, such as electric vehicles, Power Japan Plus will operate under a licensing business model, providing technology and expertise to existing battery manufacturers to produce the Ryden battery.

Kyushu University
Power Japan Plus is developing the dual carbon battery technology in partnership with Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan. Kyushu University is one of the top ranked material science and engineering research universities in the world. For more information, please visit: http://www.kyushu-u.ac.jp/english/index.php

Carbon Complex
Beyond the dual carbon battery, Power Japan Plus is creating a new, drop-in material with the world’s first and only organic carbon material – Carbon Complex. Made of naturally grown organic cotton, Carbon Complex wields unique properties not seen in other carbon material. By controlling the size of the carbon crystals during production, Power Japan Plus can engineer the Carbon Complex for a variety of high performance applications.

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15 responses to "Power Japan Plus Reveals Dual Carbon Battery Technology"

  1. David Murray says:

    Yawn.. Show me a working model in an EV and then I’ll wake up.

    1. alainl007 says:

      +1 😉

    2. kdawg says:

      All I can say is ‘stay tuned’… (not allowed to say any more than that)

      1. Cavaron says:

        Does this mean you have confidential knowledge about specifically this dual carbon battery, or another battery technology?

        1. kdawg says:

          These guys.

          1. kdawg says:

            And not really sure it’s “confidential”. I just promised not to repeat what I heard.

  2. Anthony says:

    In their video, they mention 300 mile range, so the batteries would need to be sufficiently energy dense to accommodate being packed into a car (so maybe around 200-250Wh/kg).

    But after the Envia scandal, its tough to get enthusiastic for new battery technology that isn’t at the stage where they’ve made 10,000+ cells and are looking to scale up dramatically or license the technology.

    1. Maybe says:

      While they may not be at that stage, they at least have customers and are going into production this year for space applications. So the product is at least real. Whether or not manufacturing and costs are brought down to consumer levels is another question.

    2. JakeY says:

      Count me in as another person disillusioned about such battery announcements after the whole Envia incident (and Envia had far more convincing data than this company does).

  3. Brian says:

    “Energy density of Power Japan Plus cells is, according to press release, comparable to a lithium ion battery, so this will not be the breakthrough to the long range EV.”

    I don’t know that this is a foregone conclusion. Tesla is considered by most to be a long-range EV. Its only challenge is cost, not energy density. If one could make a battery that is equivalent to Panasonic’s batteries in every way but 1/3 the cost, that would be huge. (And yes, that’s a huge “if”).

    I appreciate that chemists are looking at elements other then Lithium for energy dense, affordable batteries. Yes, Lithium is incredibly light, but it offers significant challenges. Carbon is fairly light too, and much more abundant.

    1. protomech says:

      If Power Japan Plus’s claims about charge acceptance and lack of need for heating/cooling and no thermal runaway are correct, it almost doesn’t matter what the energy density is.

      Build a 50 kWh battery pack instead of an 85 kWh pack. Even if the cells are half the density of the lithium cells, the entire battery assembly will still be about as large and heavy as the 85 kWh pack.

      If it can charge at the same 135 kW rate and still deliver full range, then ~150 miles of highway range will still let it hop between most Supercharger stations (typically spaced 100 miles apart).

      Here’s hoping they can deliver on their claims.

      1. Brian says:

        Exactly. There is more than one right answer to the problem of affordable long-range EVs.

  4. pjwood says:

    I think the “20X” charge speed was based upon a 6,600w charge rate.

  5. Josephus says:

    Very interested in getting context to compare the 3000 charge/discharge cycle.

    How far could a model S (or any other EV) go if it need no cooling and could discharge fully with no reserve, and slightly cheaper? This is a promising refresh to current battery tech.

    I wish Tesla would make a statement addressing how its giga factory would take breakthroughs like this into account. I would hate to see a disruptive technology get disrupted by newer technology because it ignored it. 😉

  6. leaf owner says:

    I hope what these guys claim is true — frankly it is a bit hard to believe they could address most of the issues today’s batteries face in one fell swoop — but I hope they have…