Poll: 97% Of Respondents Would Buy a Tesla If It Were $35,000 Or Less

3 years ago by Eric Loveday 37

This Tesla Costs Less Than $35,000

This Tesla Costs Less Than $35,000

Would You Buy a Tesla If It Were $35,000 Or Less?

Would You Buy a Tesla If It Were $35,000 Or Less?

The results of a recent poll conducted by EV World speak volumes for Tesla Motors.

When asked if respondents would buy a Tesla electric vehicle if the price was USD $35,000 or less, a shocking 97% stated they would indeed buy this reasonably affordable Tesla.

5,995.  That’s the number of respondents.  So, 97% of that figure equates to 5,815.15.  Let’s just say 5,815.

The total figure matters less than the %.

If Tesla were to be able to launch a $35,000 electric vehicle (assume this is a before tax credit price), then the results show that nearly everyone of the respondents would soon become Tesla owners.

Unfortunately, Tesla is likely still a long away from offering this $35,000 electric vehicle (we expect Gen 3 to ultimately be in the low $40,000 range…if you want one with doors), but if Tesla does eventually pull it off, then the group of loyal Tesla owners will almost certainly grow exponentially.

Source: EV World

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37 responses to "Poll: 97% Of Respondents Would Buy a Tesla If It Were $35,000 Or Less"

  1. Nate says:

    Sure, Tesla for $35k sign me up. I would be in the 97% on this one.

    The poll was done for their readers. I’d be interested in what the numbers were across the general population.

    1. Boyd says:

      heck for $35k, i would buy two.

    2. Mikael says:

      General population… Tesla what?

      1. Aaron says:

        Good point. I *still* meet people who don’t know there are pure electric vehicles out there. (“Oh, you mean a hybrid?”)

        1. Stephan says:

          I didn’t know those people existed. Everyone I know is under or right on the poverty line and knows Tesla. Some like gas guzzling cars, but I didn’t know there were still people who didn’t know there were electric cars on the road. They’ve been there for a while now.

    3. Bonaire says:

      This is misleading. The mind says that the survey indicates that people would buy “a Tesla” and what they know is the Model S and presumably know the 85kWh version. Sure, I would buy it for $35 k new as well. The problem is, the lower cost $35k unit will end up with a base price of $38k without interesting options in 2017 and have less range than the MS 60 and presumably not have base model access to superchargers.

      This also shows that people would be willing to compromise their ICE conveniences for 250+ miles of range in the summertime and access to supercharging for $35k. That is why major automakers are waiting for better batteries to build into smaller cars to possibly make something in that price range. A 200 mile BEV based on mid range high selling cars like a Camry or Cruze would do very well. So would CUV forms.

  2. Although 97% is an impressive number, it probably speaks more to the appeal of a competitively priced 200+ mile range electric car among EV enthusiasts (EV World readers).

    No doubt the respondents are expecting any Tesla to have excellent performance, superb responsiveness and aesthetic appeal.

    I wonder how many of those 97% would choose another brand if other choices were available with those attributes?

    Perhaps the biggest question is which manufacturers will be capable of mounting a competitive response to the
    likely scenario that Tesla delivers as expected?

    1. Clif says:

      Competitors can match the Tesla car with excellent performance, superb responsiveness and aesthetic appeal, but until somebody can meet or surpass the Tesla Superchargers and their network being built,I would have to stick with the Tesla. If I am out traveling around the country, I certainly don’t want to wait very long to charge my car. What do you think?

  3. Ambulator says:

    Not me. The Models S is too large. It’s hard enough for me to get my Volt in my garage.

    Also, I’ve given the automatic regeneration in the Volt (L on the shifter) a good test, and I don’t like it. Tesla needs some way to slow its cars down without trying to fine tune the accelerator to just the right position, and without friction breaks. Either add paddle controls like in the ELR or make a light touch on the breaks control regeneration.

    1. MDEV says:

      You are part of the 3%

    2. Mark says:

      Too large? Too small for me! Bring on Model X!!!

    3. Musk has already said that the Gen 3 will be 20% smaller than Model S.

    4. See Through says:

      Chevy Spark EV’s automatic regen seems pretty good in that respect. Sure, at the beginning, drivers need some time to get used to its whims.

      Spark EV has a pickup faster than a Ferrari. But it can’t can’t keep u pwith it 🙁

    5. Red HHR says:

      Smaller is better. Not all garages are big. Not all roads are wide. I consider my Volt to be a BIG car. Fewer resources used is not a bad thing. Nope I don’t know why people drive big trucks.

    6. Aaron says:

      Model S regen is adjustable.

      That being said, with some practice, you can get a LOT more range out of your EV in city driving by using high levels of regen braking.

      My i-MiEV’s range-remaining meter shows 89 miles after a full charge. Why? I drive almost exclusively on side streets and always use high regenerative braking.

      1. Big Solar says:

        me too

  4. ClarksonCote says:

    I love Tesla, but the poll sounds kind of bogus. Hearing that survey, I would answer yes immediately thinking they’re referring to Tesla’s only produciton model, the Model S, which is far more than $35k.

    “Would you buy a product that is discounted by over 50%?” SURE! 😉

    1. Gibber says:

      Agreed. I’m sure those polled are thinking of the current model S. If you asked if they would buy a LEAF for $15k you would most likely get the same poll results.

    2. evnow says:

      “Would you buy a product that is discounted by over 50%?”

      Depends on the product. I sure don’t buy a LOT of products discounted at 50% (just go to any clothes store- you can see 50% discounts a lot). Even among cars – except as a way to resell and make money – I’d not buy most of the cars even at 50% discount.

  5. pk says:

    So the other 3% response was “what’s a Tesla?”

    Here in Ontario it’s $8,500 direct rebate from the government so that $35,000 Tesla would be $26,500. My response would have been “I’ll take two”

  6. Dave R says:

    Shoot, I’d probably buy it if it were $50-60k instead of almost $100k optioned the way I’d want it.

    1. Bonaire says:

      Just buy a used one in two years.

      1. Aaron says:

        Used Teslas are holding their value. Just saw a used one on AutoTrader for MORE than retail. Why? Because you can have it right now rather than waiting.

  7. Rob Stark says:

    At the Tesla shareholders meeting Musk said the base price might be below $35k.

    A base 3rd Gen Sedan will not only get you doors but auto transmission,power windows locks, keyless entry,air conditioning, and stereo. What people now consider must haves.

    Sun roof, leather seats, adjustable suspension, fog lights,tech package,full leather interior plus headliner,parking sensors, 12 way power adjsutable seats, blow your ear drum speakers, big wheels with performance tires, premium interior lighting, rear deck spoilers, pearl paint are not close to necessary.

    The only optional items that might be a must have is supercharger access and wall connector.

    So think of 3rd Gen Sedan as $38.7 or maybe less.

    1. See Through says:

      By the time Gen III comes out, inflation alone will push the price up by 30% ! Think of all the money that’s been printed by the Fed, and the minimum wage increases everywhere.

      I wouldn’t wait for the Gen III, and just get a spark EV, which is quite sprightly I would say.

      If it’s too good to be true, it’s probably fake.

      1. evnow says:

        LOL. Another of those bond vigilantes.

  8. Leo says:

    Guys, it’s a total no-brainer to commit to a $35,000 tesla just because it’s a damn free(!) car at this price. Your monthly payment – $249 is less than your gas savings -$500?. What’s wrong with you?
    And we all naturally assume high quality, silent power , no range anxiety etc. that are all attributes of Tesla – model S or not.
    As a matter of fact even at today’s levels of $100,000 per car if the society realized all the benefits of this car it would have easily figured out low interest long term financing with no
    down payment and everybody would grab one – what a wonderful world it would be instead of printing trillions to bail out robber bankers and fighting oil wars in the Middle East.

    1. Bonaire says:

      249 is a lease payment, not a purchase. Leasing such a car is silly. Buy it and keep it 8-10 years. Or sell after 4 years and be well ahead of restarting another new lease.

    2. Rick says:

      Where can I get one of those $249 Teslas?

  9. David Murray says:

    I fully expect the 3rd generation Tesla to be over $40,000 MSRP. It may be cheaper with tax credits and I’m sure that is how Tesla will advertise it. However, I’m also expecting Nissan to have a 2nd generation Leaf that will be more visually attractive (or at least less polarizing) and 150 miles range and will probably be $10,000 less money than the Tesla.

  10. leaf owner says:

    Sign me up!

  11. Nix says:

    $35K Gen III Tesla
    -7.5K Fed incentive
    -6K Colorado incentive
    -10K in gas savings in 5yr vs. avg. gas car
    —————-
    $11.5K plus taxes, interest, and electricity

    I Should easily be able to sell one used after 5 years for at least $10-15K.

    The numbers work, like so many other plug in vehicles. That’s been my biggest hold-back for the Model S. I realize I would get more luxury and power and room for my Model S money, yadda yadda, but the thought of a $35K 200+ mile range Tesla (or any plug-in) makes me happy.

    1. Bonaire says:

      State and federal incentives are meant to start a market and not be forever. In 2017 we do not know if either will be around.

      1. Nix says:

        Yes, incentives are for starting a market.

        That is why the Colorado State inventive is only at 100% through 2018, when it starts to sunset by tapering down each year through 2021.

        That is also why the Federal incentive is only good for the first 200,000 units sold in the US, before it starts tapering down over the next few quarters after that 200K number is hit.

        The calendar will read 2017 less than 3 years from now. Model X sales don’t go ramp up into full production until spring of 2015. Are you predicting Model S + Model X sales topping 200K in the US before 2017?

  12. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Duh, that survey is dumb.

    Most people probably thinking about a $35K Model S. That would be a no brainer…

  13. Mark C says:

    “In a surprise poll, 97% of teen-aged boys would buy a new Corvette if their job at the burger joint would cover the expense of their iPhone and then the Corvette.”

    Count me in as part of the 97% dreaming of the new Tesla in my garage. And even though it’s extra cost, I’ll have a Supercharger access too, please.

    1. Bonaire says:

      Simple minds create simple surveys. Good analogy on the Corvette. And surely, boys with burger jobs certainly buy the most car possible with their money. Guys making 30k go out and get a 30k car loan thinking they will be getting raises in the future and they will be ok.