Plug-In Electric Car Sales In Sweden Reach Strong 2.6% Market Share In 2015

1 year ago by Mark Kane 24

Plug-in electric car sales in Sweden - December 2015

Plug-in electric car sales in Sweden – December 2015 (data source: EV Sales Blog)

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Sweden is one of the largest European plug-in electric car markets.

Around 9,039 sales (up 80% compared to 5,033 in 2014)  for 2015 isn’t all that high, but compared to 345,108 total registrations, Sweden stands at a remarkable 2.6% market share for plug-ins.

The other significant number is some 2,080 sales in December, which was a record month for plug-in car sales in Sweden and elsewhere around the globe.

Sweden cuts in half some incentives to plug-in hybrids (BEVs without change) this year, so the PHEV surge in the last month of the year was pretty obvious.

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, for example, noted record high 1,249 sales. With 3,297  Outlander PHEVs sold in Sweden last year, this model held the largest part of the market.

The second best selling model in Sweden was the Tesla Model S at 996 (record 172 in December). Both models controls nearly half of the Swedish plug-in electric car market (nearly 7,000 sales in a little over two years).

Plug-in electric car sales in Sweden – December 2015 (data source: EV Sales Blog)

Plug-in electric car sales in Sweden – December 2015 (data source: EV Sales Blog)

Plug-in electric car sales in Sweden - December 2015 (source: EV Sales Blog)

Plug-in electric car sales in Sweden – December 2015 (source: EV Sales Blog)

data source: EV Sales Blog

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24 responses to "Plug-In Electric Car Sales In Sweden Reach Strong 2.6% Market Share In 2015"

  1. Mikael says:

    I’ts a market which will hopefully explode in 2017 when a bonus malus system is supposed to be implemented (no details on how the system will work yet).

    Hopefully it will look more like Norway but this government has been very disappointing in environmental issues so it is possible that it might be something extremely lame instead unfortunately.

    1. Rob says:

      Agreed. I’ve been in Stockholm since Wednesday and it surprises me how few EVs I’ve seen: two Teslas and one BMW i3.

      Everything else runs off dinosaur juice.

      1. Mikael says:

        Some run on biogas and Sweden has the most biofuels in diesel/petrol in the EU so it’s not all dinojuice, but still like 85% dinojuice.

        The point still stands that there are way too few EVs on the road though. 🙂

        And with clean electricity in abundance it would be nice to have more electrified vehicles to have a reason to expand the electricity sector.

        1. Nichen says:

          We also have B100 biodiesel at keylocations in Sweden. At least in the middle and south. I cant wait to try the next generation: HVO biodiesel next month for my Audi A2. It’s molecularly identical to dino-diesel and supposedly much better for the fuelfilter.

          1. Mikael says:

            I don’t have any diesel car anymore, but I did try he HVO mixed diesel a few years back when it was introduced.

            Now I’m waiting for Preem to expand their Evolution Petrol with chemically identical petrol made from waste in the paper industry. Even if they are just adding 5% at the start it’s 5% more than the competition.

        2. Nichen says:

          Mikael, the real boom shall come in 2019 when Volvo starts producing long-range EVs.

        3. Rob says:

          You’re right, I’ve noticed all the SL buses and many of the black taxis run on biogas which is great. And I saw a Tesla taxi today!

          I also heard they are trialing electric buses in Gothenburg?

          So far after 4.5 days in Stockholm my EV count stands at 5 Teslas, 3 i3s and 1 Leaf 🙂

    2. JH says:

      Yes it will likely be a lame attempt. You see, money rules, and currently the state earsn about 1 euro per 10 kilometeres driven in sweden (various taxes and carbon dioxide emission tax). Thats a substantial amount of money on yearly basis, so the incentive for the state to keep status quo is extremely high.

      1. Mikael says:

        Reducing the money going straight out of the country to buy oil will be great for the economical balance and give a higher trade surplus.

        That money will generate a lot of tax income for the state when spent within the country instead, and it will be spent not only once but many times over.
        So if the government has competent economists doing the counting then they should know that it would be economically beneficial to force the change to EVs and away from oil.

        Also if the system would be set up as in Norway then there would be a massive increase in tax coming in to the state from the massive taxation on new non-BEV cars. So it’s actually a possibility to increase the money to the state if they want to.

        But as incompetent as they have been so far surely they will not even see that possibility and make it lame.

  2. Mr Baloo says:

    We will probably see a boost in sales when Nevs launch their EVs:
    See video from the factory:
    Swedish Minister of Infrastructure visited Nevs:
    http://ttela.se/bild/tv#7PkAoVlNqpWATRjw8bDgeA

    1. Philip C says:

      While true that NEVS will start making electric cars in Sweden (or parts, more rather, like chassis that will be shipped to China for manufacturing there), they’ve gone out saying that EV’s on the Swedish market wouldn’t be a reality until 2020. Don’t remeber the year fully but they will fullfil their contracts first before expanding to new regions.

    2. Mikael says:

      NEVS is fairly irrelevant. It’s the government that will make the change necessary to stimulate EVs and they are looking at the countries and also Volvos well-being, not NEVS.

      If NEVS would actually become something and produce a number of EVs it would be an added bonus.

  3. Mister G says:

    Wait a minute..how can Swedes afford to buy Tesla’s aren’t they in a socialist high tax country? Can Bernie be telling America the truth?

    1. viktor says:

      We have high taxes (around 30%) but we also have nearly free health care, free studies on university and more wish could help us to have higher incomes. It’s not only high income that make you rich, it can also be low bills.

      1. Mister G says:

        Do you live in Sweden? I live near Orlando, Florida and I can only afford a 2016 Nissan Leaf, and I make around $58,000 per year.

        1. alohart says:

          I live half of each year in Sweden and half in the U.S. Although the total tax burden in Sweden is higher than in the U.S., its government provides more valuable services to its citizens than does the U.S. government. They don’t spend so much money on the military, they don’t send huge amounts of money to other countries because they run a foreign trade surplus, they don’t waste huge amounts of money on health insurance, they ride bicycles and take public transportation rather than owning multiple cars, they don’t pay university tuition, etc. The average standard of living in Sweden feels considerably higher than that in the U.S., so many Swedes can afford summer homes, sailboats, and expensive cars, but it isn’t culturally acceptable to flaunt one’s wealth. If the winter weather weren’t so bad, I would prefer to live in Sweden year-round. I would love Bernie’s U.S., but conservatives would never allow it to happen 🙁

          1. Mister G says:

            Conservatives believe that Socialism will cost them more money and decrease their standard of living, you must share your story with Bernie

  4. Mister G says:

    How can these Socialist Swedes buy 992 Teslas and pay higher taxes than Americans…WTF

    1. Mikael says:

      Are you asking for real?

      In a socialist country you generally pay less in total since there are no greedy companies and hands in between the service you want.

      Like private hospitals and doctors making s*** loads of money, insurance companies taking their (un)fair share and having to pay for everything along the way like tuition, childcare (and the massive loans you might end up with) or dental or whatever.

      Also public transport and municipally owned apartment buildings keeps cost of transport and living down.

      So you might have to give away 35-40% or your salary straight away but 60% of a high salary is still a lot and then a lot of things are “free” (or rather prepaid 😉 and you also get the luxury of not having to worry about your health, education or people out in the streets being so poor they feel the need to rob you.

      It’s not a perfect system, everything has flaws. But imagine all the perks, including a number of people affording Teslas and some of the richest people in the world being able to make their money in a socialist country. 😉

      1. Mister G says:

        I was being sarcastic, I’m a Bernie Sanders supporter and hope that American Republicans read your message and stop believing that socialism is the root of all evil LOL berniesanders.com

        1. Mikael says:

          I’m happy you were sarcastic, that was my first feeling but I wasn’t totally sure. 🙂

          I hope you educate your fellow countrymen so that such question would never have to be asked for real. 😛

  5. andre says:

    check taxes North of the border, close to Bernie…….70 ms…(Scandinavia is a bit too far away)

  6. Disapointed swede says:

    I am higly disapointed with the curent goverments environmental effords tho, it seems like loads of talk and no action.
    They were elected in part to puch for more environmentally friendly polecys that they promised, and what have they done so far?

    -put a tax on energy from solar panels, check

    -halfed the incentives for plugin hybrids, check

    -pushed for softer pollution rules in the EU, check.

    -ruled that net metering is agenst EU tax law (even tho it is allowed in germany) check.

    -stoped the bonus malus system prepeared by the old goverment due to presure from volvo, check.

    Disapointing is a to week word for this goverment. Can’t we swapp them out now allready?

    1. Mikael says:

      The tax on solar energy is a good thing. Solar energy in Sweden will lead to a negative shift in the energy balance and will increase the fossil fuels (most likely electricity imported generated by coal from Denmark/Germany or from oil/natural gas in in the swedish combined heat/electricity plants).

      Net metering is also a good thing that they are stopping. It’s a ridiculous thing that should not exist as it is a massive and unfair incentive that will break any model of taxation or keeping the utilities and grids running properly. Although it’s good that it still exists in Germany since they are superdirty and mostly coal so breaking utilities is a good thing in their case.

      The rest I agree on. Disappointing is not strongly enough worded. But what should you expect from an “environmental party” that is just a bunch of hippies, run by irrational feelings, who don’t have any education or technical understanding and never have done anything to help the environment for real.
      Useless, worthless and hopeless.