Opel Ampera-E Range Beats All Competitors

4 months ago by Eric Loveday 34

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

With the announcement of the Chevrolet Bolt rated at 238 miles of electric range, we knew its cousin, the Opel Ampera-E, would get a similar range-related announcement soon.

Sure enough, that announcement has arrived.

The title of the press release is “Range over 400 Kilometers: New Opel Ampera-e Revolutionizes Electro-Mobility,” but that only tells part of the story.

When it gets published, the actual NEDC rating for the Ampera-E will be north of~500 kilometers mark (310 miles), but the official figure hasn’t been released yet, so Opel is playing it safe for now with the more realistic “over 400 kilometers” statement.

Even if we go with the “over 400” km statement, the Ampera-E still handily beats all of its competitors. As Opel points out:

“In accordance with the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC, the current standard for range comparisons between different vehicles) the new e‑car from Rüsselsheim can clear the magical 400 kilometer barrier by a considerable margin without recharging (purely electrical range measured based on the NEDC in km: >400; provisional figure).

This makes Opel’s new electric compact model by far the best in its segment. In comparison, the BMW i3, even equipped with the optional large 33 kWh battery can only cover 300 kilometers in the NEDC (New European Driving Cycle), the Nissan Leaf manages 250 kilometers, the Renault Zoe 240 kilometers and the VW e-Golf 190 kilometers. With at least 25 percent more range than its closest competitor, the Opel Ampera-e revolutionizes electro-mobility.”

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

Additional highlights pointed out by Opel include the Ampera-E’s ability to accelerate from 0 to 50 km/h in 3.2 seconds, ability to haul five people and also swallow large amounts of cargo in its 381 liter “trunk.”

On the performance front, Opel states:

“The maximum torque of 360 Nm is responsible for the electrifying temperament of the Opel newcomer. Effortless starts from a standing position (such as at traffic lights) or highway access are two of the Opel Ampera-e’s main strengths.

The compact car accelerates from 0 to 50 km/h in 3.2 seconds, mid-range acceleration from 80 to 120 km/h, which is especially important for overtaking, is successfully completed in 4.5 seconds (preliminary figures).”

Unlike for the Bolt, where Chevrolet states that its price will be less than $37,500, Opel has provided no pricing information at this point in time. The Ampera-E will make its world debut at the Paris Motor Show at the end of this month and we expect both pricing and its launch schedule to be announced then.

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

You’ll find more Ampera-E info in the full press blast below:

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

Range over 400 Kilometers: New Opel Ampera-e Revolutionizes Electro-Mobility

Best in class: At least 25 percent more range than the closest competitor

Sprinter: Accelerates from 0 to 50 in just 3.2 seconds

Exhibition star: World premiere at the Paris Motor Show on September 29

Rüsselsheim. The Opel Ampera-e will finally eradicate the biggest downside of an electric car for everyone – range anxiety. In accordance with the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC, the current standard for range comparisons between different vehicles) the new e‑car from Rüsselsheim can clear the magical 400 kilometer barrier by a considerable margin without recharging (purely electrical range measured based on the NEDC in km: >400; provisional figure). This makes Opel’s new electric compact model by far the best in its segment. In comparison, the BMW i3, even equipped with the optional large 33 kWh battery can only cover 300 kilometers in the NEDC (New European Driving Cycle), the Nissan Leaf manages 250 kilometers, the Renault Zoe 240 kilometers and the VW e-Golf 190 kilometers. With at least 25 percent more range than its closest competitor, the Opel Ampera-e revolutionizes electro-mobility. Naturally, the maximum range in everyday use deviates from the NEDC values. In practice, factors such as road characteristics, weather conditions, driving style or additional load influence the range. However, the Ampera-e can effortlessly cover more than 300 kilometers even under average everyday conditions. Opel’s newcomer will celebrate its world premiere at the Paris Motor Show (Public days: October 1 to 16) in Hall 5-2 (booth 501).

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

“In the Ampera-e we will bring an electric car suitable for everyday use to the market. It delivers an extensive range and will be offered as of spring next year already. The Opel Ampera-e is not eco-luxury, not a gadget and not a pure second car. Opel is showing that electro-mobility is also achievable for a much broader audience thanks to the most innovative technology – Opel is democratizing the electric car with the Ampera-e,” said an enthusiastic Opel CEO Dr. Karl‑Thomas Neumann.

However, the 4.17 meter long Ampera-e not only impresses with its outstanding range. It also offers space for up to five people and a trunk volume of 381 liters, which is clearly above average for cars of a similar overall length. This generous spaciousness is made possible by the clever integration of the ten battery modules. The entire package is located in the underbody and is tailored to the contours of the vehicle. This means that no space is wasted. The battery consisting of 288 lithium-ion cells and a capacity of 60 kWh was developed in cooperation with LG Chem.

Driving pleasure: First a sprint then energy recuperation

The Opel Ampera-e excites with its acceleration that is on par with sportscars. The maximum torque of 360 Nm is responsible for the electrifying temperament of the Opel newcomer. Effortless starts from a standing position (such as at traffic lights) or highway access are two of the Opel Ampera-e’s main strengths. The compact car accelerates from 0 to 50 km/h in 3.2 seconds, mid-range acceleration from 80 to 120 km/h, which is especially important for overtaking, is successfully completed in 4.5 seconds (preliminary figures). Top speed is electronically limited to 150 km/h for the benefit for the overall range. The performance of the electric engine is equivalent to 150 kW/204 hp.

Opel Ampera-E

Opel Ampera-E

But the Ampera-e has even more to offer: the revolutionary electric car allows casual and almost silent cruising while also being able to recharge the batteries when in motion. To do so, the driver just needs to ease off the accelerator in the normal “Drive” mode. The Ampera-e recuperates automatically in overrun and wins back energy from the electric motor that doubles as a generator. The motor’s braking effect is increased when the driver switches to “Low” mode, thus also increasing recuperation. Furthermore, the driver can switch to “Regen on Demand” for maximum energy recuperation via a paddle at the back of the steering wheel. The drag torque of the motor is so high in “Low/Regen on Demand” modes that the brake pedal does not need to be applied to reduce speed to a full stop in normal traffic. The Ampera-e can thus safely be controlled via the accelerator (One Pedal Driving). Obviously, the brake pedal still needs to be applied in case of emergency. Initial vehicle simulation models show that drivers can increase the range by up to five percent compared to “Drive” mode when applying “One Pedal Driving” with the corresponding full recuperation when in dense city stop-and-go traffic.

Fully connected: With Opel OnStar and smartphone integration

Outstanding digital connectivity is an integral part of a sustainable concept. The Ampera-e has both latest generation IntelliLink infotainment and Opel OnStar on board – the award‑winning connectivity and service assistant offers a powerful Wi-Fi hotspot for up to seven devices (depending on the market). The Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatible IntelliLink systems bring the world of smartphones into the Ampera-e, thus allowing passengers complete access to their favorite music or the possibility of streaming movies.

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34 responses to "Opel Ampera-E Range Beats All Competitors"

  1. Zbig says:

    Bravo GM. You just started the race at the end of which the world will really be a better place. Who’s next?

    1. GIMIJON says:

      Concentrating on range & not Spped, I like that ! The car is fast enough…Tesla should do that to ! But Elon is STUBBORN and set in his ways. I say, Concentrate making Fuel efficient EV’s with respectable Performance , Improving the range I think is the key , Not making them Stupid Fast.

      1. Harold says:

        I disagree, Fast is relevant because rarely do you use the full range of your vehicle on a daily basis. My Ford Focus EV is “fun” to drive for the 78 miles it supposedly gets. I didn’t buy a Leaf because it drove like a couch. I hope the Bolt/Ampera is fun to drive also. The car should be exciting when you want it to be.

      2. floydboy says:

        You’re kidding right?! How about a car that’s the quickest AND the longest ranged!🙂

  2. mr. M says:

    It will get at least 480 km NEDC.

    1. R.S says:

      The NEFZ is so unpredictable, but 500km should be possible. If it gets as efficient as the Leaf.

  3. Someone out there says:

    It should get 556 km NEDC range if measured like the 30kWh Nissan LEAF. The LEAf in EPA is 172km and 250km in NEDC. 250/172*383 ≈ 556.68.

    1. Terawatt says:

      Yep – if it beats the LEAF by as much on NEDC as on EPA, the resulting range is 556,68 km.

      Of course the NEDC cycle isn’t identical to EPA, and I don’t know if city/highway are weighted the same in the respective “combined” cycles.

      So it might not be exactly 556 km NEDC. For all I know it could be a bit less – or a bit MORE.

      In any case it should not deviate by very much, so I allow myself to hope for 550km. Not that it really matters – since EPA is a far superior guide to what you should expect to achieve in the real world.

  4. Grodan boll says:

    The race is on.
    Who will Win and take most marketshare?

    1. Nix says:

      BYD (China is the biggest EV growth market, and BYD is dominating growth)

  5. MDEV says:

    Bye bye BMW i3

    1. Yogurt says:

      The i3 and Leafs will be a hard to sell now at there price and range…
      BMW needs to up there range again ASAP…

      1. LOL says:

        If GM were smart enough to limit the price of top trim level of European Bolt to 33 k Euros, rig it up with adaptive suspension, insert Apple Car Play, then not only BMW i3 and Nissan Leaf sales would suffer, but those of Audi A4 and likes also. For the time being it’s not quite clear what GM’s final intentions regarding European market are. If they are really serious about it I suspect we might see them deliver on abovement features.

        1. Kdawg says:

          It has Android Auto and Apple Carplay

      2. Terawatt says:

        I believe Nissan will be ok. The argument is a little involved, but bear with me.

        The 2017 LEAF will get 400 km NEDC and have 40 kWh useable capacity. The Ampera-e will probably get 550 km NEDC, implying that the cars are equally efficient, with the Ampera-e having 50% more useable capacity.

        (I am reasonably sure the 60 kWh are useable capacity; if you calculate the total energy required to charge the Bolt/Ampera-e from zero to hero based on MPGe and range, you get 66,7 kWh. If it had only 55 kWh useable that would imply a charging efficiency of only 82% which is very low. With 60 kWh useable it implies a charging efficiency of 89% which is actually still a little low but certainly seems more plausible.)

        Now, if the LEAF is 400km and Ampera-e is 550km, that means you can go 50% farther in the latter, right? Well, no. Not in practice. You will need the full range of these vehicles only when you go on long trips, not in your everyday driving. The LEAF already has better areodynamics than the Bolt and the facelifted version for 2017 improves it further. So the highway range of the LEAF will be closer than the combined-cycle one. You will probably get “only” 35-40% more range when you drive far with the Ampera-e than you’d get in a LEAF.

        Clearly the Ampera-e is the more desireable car, but the LEAF is cheaper. I believe Nissan like everyone else was surprised by GMs move, offering up nearly 20% more range than the 200 miles they had been promising (even if everyone expected them to slightly exceed this). They will probably have to lower the price of the LEAF. But from what I’ve read (at PushEVs) they have room to do so while still remaining profitable.

        I believe Nissan is willing to offer some profit margin for market share and thus will drop the price. And while both cars can be called “affordable” the Bolt/Ampera-e will certainly be expensive for *some* part of the market. If we assume a price of $35k and €35k for Bolt/Ampera-e, this is a little above average in the US and well above average in the EU, which means it is a stretch for a significant proportion of potential buyers.

        I’m not saying this is a win for Nissan. But I don’t think the Bolt/Ampera-e will devastate them – at least not in Europe. I’m less sure about the US, where Nissan seems to have developed serious image problems. At least the LEAF, even as the longest-range EV in it’s price bracket, has struggled badly in the US while selling well everywhere else.

        BMW and VW however look totally uncompetitive. I believe both will be forced to either drop prices significantly or somehow manage to bring new upgrades to market in 2017 – or just accept a big loss of market share. They can’t expect to sell 300km (NEDC) cars at a price above Nissan and Renault’s 400km otherwise similar offerings.

    2. Nix says:

      BMW has relied heavily on the REX for sales. Since the i3 REX is fundamentally completely different than any other electric car on the market today, BMW will still have that niche market to sell to.

      1. wavelet says:

        Not very appealing, with 180mi total range (including the gasoline tank’s) vs. the Bolt’s 238…
        Also, BMW can’t easily significantly enlarge the small fuel tank either, even if it wanted to:
        1) There’s not much additional room there where the tank’s located, and no other location in the vehicle for a large tank;
        2) The US CARB definitions which BMW wanted so it could get max credits require that the gas range be less than AER.

  6. FFE1 says:

    very exciting – lets go!

  7. Kdawg says:

    I hope they don’t price it in the stratosphere, or it will be the Ampera (Euro-Volt) all over again.

  8. Assaf says:

    Will it be a Bolt clone, or a different design?

    1. Someone out there says:

      It’s a rebranded Bolt EV

    2. wavelet says:

      Yes, only badge and some minor trim details are different. It’s also going to be produced in the US AFAIK, which means it’ll get hit with a 10% (IIRC) import duty in the EU (this is why Tesla does final assembly on EU-destined cars in the Netherlands).

      1. ClarksonCote says:

        Does the US hit foreign auto-makers like BMW with import duties too? If not, seems like we should start considering it.

        1. Jonas says:

          On cars the duty is 2,5%. On other products, like tobacco and peanuts, the US import duty is much higher than when shipping goods into the EU.
          I don’t see this like a good argument for raising the US import duties, however. But it is a good argument for agreeing on TTIP.

          1. Priusmaniac says:

            Agreeing on TTIP will be very hard but it would be good to agree on a mutual zero percent duty on pure electric vehicles.

  9. Pete says:

    Yeah should be around 530 km NEDC.

  10. Jay Dubbya says:

    All of this news about what the Bolt / Amerpa-e can do has got me stoked!!

  11. Hauer says:

    No word about (quick) charging?

  12. filip bjurling says:

    Nedc will probably be around 530km!! this is a wierd statement from opel probably coming from their sales division who doesn’t have a clue..

    1. Terawatt says:

      I think 550km – although I don’t know enough about the differences between the cycles to tell whether the Bolt should win by less or more than on EPA, if you assume it should beat it by exactly as much you get 556 km.

      Opel’s choice to advertise it as “more than 400km” is probably just an attempt to create the same effect in the EU as they did for the Bolt by speaking of 200 miles – only to reveal it was much more.

      1. Terawatt says:

        Perhaps their logic, or psychology, is that they thing people will think “the Bolt beat it’s estimate by nearly 20%, so I expect Ampera-e to get 480km”. If people/journalists speculate this way, they will get the “wow” experience we got for Bolt when it is revealed to be 550km.

  13. Priusmaniac says:

    0 to 50 Km/h instead of the normally given 0 to 100 Km/h, why is that for? Is it an attempt to make it sound like the car is making Tesla like performance?

  14. Priusmaniac says:

    Since this one is going to be sold in Europe, it would be really useful to give the range at 120 Km/h and at 130 Km/h since that is the standard speed on most European freeways. Driving far is usually done by using the freeway, so that is an important information, since NEDC range is completely out of touch with real life range. At 130 Km/h that would be more around 250 Km than 500 Km, which is half as much. 250 Km is not bad but it should be stated clearly not kind of hidden.

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