First Opel Ampera-E Deliveries Get Underway In Norway

3 months ago by Mark Kane 33

First Opel Ampera-e deliveries in Norway

Opel has officially delivered the first three Ampera-e all-electric cars in Norway on the occasion of Norwegian Constitution Day.  Perhaps not surprisingly, and with the Holiday in mind,  the EVs were in the three national colors – red, white and blue.

First Opel Ampera-e deliveries in Norway…apparently flowers are to be gifted at such occasions

Norwegian customers are now awaiting the further arrival of more than 4,000 pre-ordered Ampera-es.

Not unexpectedly, Opel said that more deliveries will naturally follow in the coming days and weeks, but without further details about the depth of those numbers.

Of note: We have already learned it will take into 2018 for all the current pre-orders to be filled due to limited European production by GM out of America

“What better way to celebrate a national holiday than by being amongst the first customers in Europe to drive away in brand-new Opel Ampera-e. Three happy Norwegian customers marked Norwegian Constitution Day by doing exactly that after receiving their Ampera-e electric cars in front of the Oslo hall. More will naturally follow in the coming days and weeks.

The success of the Ampera-e in Norway, the most mature EV market in the world, is unrivaled. To date, Opel has already received more than 4,000 customer orders for the revolutionary electric car from Norwegian customers alone – some even placed reservations before it had even been revealed at the Paris Motor Show in October 2016. Now three customers have been able to collect their new electric cars. Matching the colors of the national flag, a red, a white and a blue Ampera-e were handed over to Turid Høiem, Bente Østreng and Helmer Teksdal.”

First Opel Ampera-e deliveries in Norway

Opel Vice President Sales & Aftersales Peter Christian Küspert. said:

“I am delighted that we have been able to present the first three proud Ampera-e owners with their cars. The Ampera-e makes everyday electro-mobility feasible and is presently the car to beat in its segment,”

Bente Østreng from Oslo, the proud owner of the blue Ampera-e, said:

“I’ve been looking forward to this for a long time, and I’m very excited. We are already looking forward to taking it for the first long journey to our cabin in Sweden.”

More about Opel Ampera-e:

“The Opel Ampera-e redefines electro-mobility with its electric range of 520 km (based on NEDC) – at least 100 km of additional range more than its nearest segment rival currently on the road. While the NEDC is important to create comparability, in the real world, factors such as road characteristics, weather conditions, driving style or additional load influence the range. Opel therefore also put the Ampera-e through tests similar to the speed profile defined in the WLTP driving cycle (shortened test procedure). The WLTP results are closer to real driving behavior. And the Opel Ampera-e also delivers here; based on these tests, the engineers estimate the combined WLTP range at 380 kilometers. Naturally, the range in everyday use will vary and depends on personal driving behavior and on external factors. However, the biggest obstacle to buying electric vehicles – range anxiety – is thus a thing of the past; and despite its future-potential, plus the advantages of pro-environmental electric mobility, the Ampera-e offers the acceleration of a powerful, traditional sports car.

Opel Ampera-e arrives in Norway!

With its fast running rivers and waterfalls Norway has the ability to generate clean energy based on electricity from hydropower. This makes the country a perfect habitat for electric cars. Combined with incentives like no sales tax, access to bus lanes and free parking, there is no country in the world where more electric cars have already been registered in relation to the population. More than 150,000 electrified cars are already on Norway’s roads – in a country with only five million inhabitants.

Opel is focusing on launching the Ampera-e first in the countries that already have some form of EV infrastructure in place or countries that have shown ambition to become EV leaders. It has been on sale in Norway since December 2016 and, as indicated then, deliveries to Norwegian customers are starting now. Germany and the Netherlands announced their prices recently and the first German and Dutch customers will get their cars before end of the year. Elsewhere, order books in Switzerland will open later this summer.”

Tags: , , , , ,

33 responses to "First Opel Ampera-E Deliveries Get Underway In Norway"

  1. Longvsshort says:

    My thinking is that since GM/Chevrolet has little to no ICE sales in Norway for the Bolt (Ampera-E) to take the spotlight from, then why not ship Bolts to the max to that country. Very wealthy country with subsidized EVs and 35% EVs/PHEVs sales at this point (highest percentage in the world by a long shot. Heck, BMW has to date sold slightly more i3s in Norway than in their home market Germany, which has a far far larger car market.

    1. Terawatt says:

      Exactly – is not rocket science. But clearly GM prefers to pile up inventory in the US rather than sell this vehicle in Europe, a market that unlike the US has very strong demand for compacts and subcompacts. Check out the bestseller lists for European markets and see for yourself: small cars absolutely dominate on this side of the pond.

      GM simply doesn’t want to sell to many. When they showed the prototype, and announced this car would not be production constrained (IIRC their choice of words were something like “GM will meet demand”) I actually believed they were not making a compliance car, but trying to undermine Model 3 and steal Tesla’s thunder.

      Perhaps it was Americans electing the Orangutan and getting Pruitt as head of the EPA that changed their mind. In any case it’s now clear GM just wanted to develop the technology and learn more about the EV market by getting involved at a trial scale. They are now better prepared when EVs become profitable and mainstream. But they don’t want to accelerate that development.

      It makes sense, kind of, if you consider their ICE products are more profitable and believe they can get away with it (many fact with incredulity to the claim someone makes something they don’t want to sell, thinking no further). But funnily enough it may still end up forcing GMs hand. They can’t keep production down for years without giving the game away even to the dim, and they’ll soon have to meet with managers from the EV division armed with data showing unprecedented customer satisfaction from Bolt buyers.

      Canada, South Korea and Europe will buy this car. Perhaps quite a lot of Chinese too (not the average buyer, but it’s a gigantic market after all). They aren’t allowed to in 2017, and it’s not clear if they will be in 2018 either. But I’m certain GM could easily make and sell more than double the number of cars they do in 2017. They choose not to. Why is speculative, but that this is their preference at the moment is indisputable.

  2. Jean-François Morissette says:

    According to this site, the delivery are well underway now: http://www.itanywhere.no/Stats.php

    1. Jay Cole says:

      Hence the “officially”, a lot of offerings see registrations logged (in a lot of countries) before actual retail launch, and some test/captured consumer cars also tend to turn up. So generally you see a quantity registered just before launch as testers/media cars, then a whack right around the officially release.

      Another example of this is there has already been more than few Audi “EV” e-trons registered in Germany, but we are still a ~year out from that offering. A few Chrysler Pacifica Hybrids where registered in January, despite the official Earth Day/April launch.

      The nutshell is, the Ampera-e has launched, and now you are seeing the public/retail roll-out happening/reported on by the actual masses.

      Sidenote: We did also report on the first technical registrations when they happened in early April (link here):

      1. Jean-François Morissette says:

        Thanks for the clarification. So if we keep track of those numbers, we will see that from now on, the registrations should increase rapidly, as most of the registrations are no more testers/media cars. Anyway, nice to see the roll out happening!

        Do you think the sales will finally take off in NA too?

        1. Jay Cole says:

          Yes, for sure…just over the past week there has been a lot of registrations. So giving the way production is batched it will continue to rise and fall, but should be much higher/consistent from here on out.

          Inventory isn’t terribly constrained in the US, and the order book is basically worked through. We don’t like to predict the future if we can help it, but it seems like a normalized level of ~1,500-2,000 a month seems like a fair guess once everything settles down/evens out.

  3. Warren says:

    The population of Norway is 5,323,741, with 4,000 sold.

    The population of the US is 326,214,773, with 4,000+ sold. Per capita, the US should have purchased almost a quarter million by now. You can’t fix stupid.

    1. Warren says:

      These folks make money selling North Sea oil, and heavily subsidize importing electric vehicles. We import oil, and don’t even promote our own electric vehicle industry in any meaningful way.

    2. Warren says:

      And you can’t put this on GM alone. There are over 4,000 available right now, in all the major US markets. There are even nineteen for sale, at three Chevy dealers, in Illinois today…two months ahead of schedule.

    3. ModernMarvelFan says:

      Well, apparently, those “tall/big” Norwegians don’t have the same big fat asses like American who complain about the seat!

    4. unlucky says:

      It’s due to a massive difference in the level of subsidy/taxation. Due to the taxation in Norway you can buy a Tesla Model S for the same price as a Golf GTI. A Bolt would probably be cheaper than the cheapest gas car.

      And that’s before the fringe benefits you get like bus lane access.

      The US doesn’t have the same priorities. That’s all it is. It’s nothing to do with stupid.

      1. Warren says:

        Yes, priorities. You just described stupid.

        1. Warren says:

          Norway is happiest, followed by
          Denmark, Iceland, Switzerland and Finland. The US is 14th and falling.

          http://www.bbc.com/news/world-39325206

          1. EndResult says:

            So when are you moving? Need any help packing?

  4. VS says:

    In Norwegian then, but happy new owners show their new Ampera-e’s on FB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1008646832545286/

  5. Pete says:

    This car is not available in Europe, joke!

    1. Someone out there says:

      Really? Then where did they move Norway to and when did they do it? I completely missed it.

  6. Adam says:

    Bjorn Nyland, please get yor hands of one of these in Norway and plug it into one of those 100kW Combo chargers and lets finally see if it can charge above 50kW on DC.

    1. mustang_sallad says:

      Seconded

  7. unlucky says:

    Bolt advertising update:

    A local Chevy dealer is advertising the Bolt on the radio. Their ad said “every car is priced to move” and I thought to myself I wonder if that included the Bolt.

    Well, their ad went on to mention the Cruze and the Bolt (calling it the Bolt EV so there was no mistake). They said you can drive (meaning lease) a Bolt EV for $225/month. No word on the down payment, it’s probably quite a bit.

    1. Tom says:

      Quite a bit? Unpossible. Car dealers on the radio NEVER exaggerate or leave out substantive cost information.

    2. SparkEV says:

      Not sure where you live, but ev-vin shows Fremont Chevy (NoCal) offering $149/mo + $3500 and Rydell (SoCal) offering $219/mo + $3300.

      http://ev-vin.blogspot.com/

      I am very tempted! Damn you Chevy, why couldn’t you allow towing with Bolt!

      1. unlucky says:

        I’m sure there are better deals around. What’s notable here is a car dealer was actually advertising the Bolt on radio. And it wasn’t a dealer in the EV-crazed South Bay (Santa Clara County, like Fremont) either. But it was in the SF Bay Area.

        Just because Chevy doesn’t say you can tow doesn’t mean you can’t tow. You can’t tow big stuff, but small stuff should be okay. I forget what it was but I was following some small Fit-sized car today that had a small tow receiver on it.

        1. WadeTyhon says:

          The dealer I’m buying from has been running ads on the Volt, Bolt, and Malibu Hybrid to tout their new electric sales center. No pricing, but its great to see a dealer taking EVs and PHEVs seriously in Texas:

          http://www.buzzsmith.us/?p=3893

        2. SparkEV says:

          ANY car can tow. Even VW beetle can tow. But without MFR blessing, you’re gambling with them denying warranty coverage for the drive train. I’m not going to risk 60 kWh battery. Considering I was quoted $35K for 18.4 kWh SparkEV battery by the dealer if out of warranty (yes, $10K more than the car just for the battery), 60 kWh out of warranty could cost almost $100K!

          It’s not 100% certainty that towing will break anything, but there are some cars with natural defect, and it will be tough to argue they were natural defect to be covered under warranty or towing induced problem.

          1. bro1999 says:

            Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.

            A manufacturer would have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that an accessory specifically caused a failure. They can’t just go “Oh, I see you have a hitch installed, so we’re gonna deny your failed powertrain claim because you obviously must have towed something”. They would have to prove that you actually towed anything. Sorta hard to do unless you admit it to the manufacturer, or if you recorded yourself towing a 2,500 pound boat and put it on Youtube.

            One could always go “I just use my hitch for my bike rack”.

      2. WadeTyhon says:

        When I was on the Bolt builder page last week there was an accessory carrier mount as a dealer option.

        The one on Chevrolet.com was intended for a Bike rack, so it has a very limited weight capacity.

        But I decided to look up the manufacturer of this carrier mount and came across 4 trailer hitches that are compatible with the Bolt EV and include PDF install instructions with photos:

        http://www.curtmfg.com/HitchLookup/find?year=2017&make=Chevrolet&model=Bolt+EV

        “This particular class 1 hitch is designed to be a custom hitch for certain years of the Chevy Bolt (to verify vehicle compatibility, see the CURT application guide at curtmfg.com). Tested in accordance with SAE J684 standards, it offers a weight carrying capacity of 1,000 lbs.”

        1. SparkEV says:

          I’d be afraid to even have a hitch on the car. See my response above.

          SparkEV bottom is smooth, and attaching a hitch require some cutting. For a lease, that might be a no-no (more wear and tear money at least turn-in). Per instructions in PDF, “Trim
          lower fascia using aviation shears”

          1. WadeTyhon says:

            I can see that, especially with a lease.

            My only suggestion is that if the dealer can install the light carrier mount from Curt mfg, then it’s worth asking the dealer if they would install one of the other available options from Curt mfg as well.

            I don’t think you would have to worry about your warranty if it is installed by the dealer and you keep within the 1,000 lbs towing capacity.

            But on a lease you may be right that it could cost you more on wear and tear at the end of your lease.

        2. bro1999 says:

          I got the Drawtite Bolt hitch. It doesn’t hang as low as the Curt hitch, and IMO is sturdier than the Curt hitch due to the way it mounts to the frame.

          I used it to carry my 70 pound Thule Cargo Hitch Box for a camping trip this past weekend…no issues at all!

          I don’t plan to tow, but just to use to carry my box and bike rack.

          If any Ampera-E owner could scrub their owner’s manual about towing capacity and report back what it says, it’d be much appreciated!

          1. bro1999 says:

            Drawtite hitch is also rated for 2,000 tow/200 tongue. Of course the Bolt is rated for 0# towing. 😉

  8. Tom W says:

    I am so very very happy for you my Viking brothers and sisters!! You will truly enjoy this car! It pure fun! As a Chevy Bolt owner only knows too well!

  9. John Doe says:

    GM is not able to meet demand, and they are not interested to do so.
    People have to wait to 2018 or longer, if they order the car now.
    There are many that is not on the waiting list any longer. The model 3 is probably coming before GM ramps up production.
    I understand that they may not make as much money on the EV as planned – but why not just raise the price a bit?

    I have seen the car at a dealer. One, and it was sold. The dealer had given the buyer a better price if they could keep the car in the showroom for an extra week.

    The car looks OK, and seems OK inside as well. I notice they have saved money on the interior (material type and quality, and the seat model), but it’s still a car they could sell many of. Even it they raised the price $5.000
    But that is probably as high as people are willing to go.
    The competitors will start to look better, even though their range is lower.
    Material quality in a e-Golf is higher, and it is super quiet.
    The Renault Zöe does also have a cheap interior, but they can deliver a car.
    The i3 from BMW has higher material quality, and not to mention a more advanced design/construction. Could do with a facelift to make it better looking though. The car is expensive, but they have a very good and cheap maintenance deal for that model.
    The new Nissan will sell a lot I think, and it will look better. Still waiting for a better e-NV 200, but not sure when that will happen. Nissan sold their battery business too. So now they are free to buy their batteries from NEC, Samsung and LG i guess.

    Too bad for Opel, that it not getting the cars they need. Especially when they have so many cars ordered.
    With no waiting list I think they could have sold 7500 in a year in Norway. At least..

Leave a Reply