Official Chevrolet Bolt Details: 200+ Miles, Starting Price Of $30,000 – Pics, Videos

2 years ago by Eric Loveday 161

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Volt EV Concept

Chevrolet Volt EV Concept

The game-changing electric car has arrived in the form of the Chevrolet Bolt concept.

According to General Motors, the Bolt EV concept signals the automakers electric vehicle strategy: affordable, long-range electric.

GM claims that the Bolt will “offer more than 200 miles” of electric range with a starting price of “around $30,000.”  If General Motors can deliver on those two claims, then the Bolt could well be a game-changer.

Most importantly, GM states that the Bolt is an electric car that will be sold nationwide:

“Bolt EV concept is designed to offer long-range performance in all 50 states and many global markets.”

General Motors CEO Mary Barra stated:

“The Bolt EV concept is a game-changing electric vehicle designed for attainability, not exclusivity.  Chevrolet believes electrification is a pillar of future transportation and needs to be affordable for a wider segment of customers.”

An obtainable, affordable, long-range electric car.  That’s precisely what we’ve all been demanding for years now. Props to GM for delivering the vehicle we desire.

Chevrolet Bolt Debuts In Detroit At The 2015 NAIAS

Chevrolet Bolt Debuts In Detroit At The 2015 NAIAS

Chevrolet Bolt EV

Chevrolet Bolt EV

Chevrolet Bolt EV

Chevrolet Bolt EV

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Look for the Bolt to debut in final production form in 2017.

Press release below:

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept Signals Brand’s EV Strategy
Affordable, long-range concept builds on brand’s electrification leadership

2015-01-12

DETROIT – Chevrolet today made a significant statement on its commitment to electrification with the introduction of the Bolt EV concept – a vision for an affordable, long-range all-electric vehicle designed to offer more than 200 miles of range starting around $30,000.

“The Bolt EV concept is a game-changing electric vehicle designed for attainability, not exclusivity,” said General Motors CEO Mary Barra. “Chevrolet believes electrification is a pillar of future transportation and needs to be affordable for a wider segment of customers.”

Leveraging the electrification prowess established by Volt and Spark EV, the Bolt EV concept is designed to offer long-range performance in all 50 states and many global markets.

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept - Live Image Credit: Tom Moloughney

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept – Live Image Credit: Tom Moloughney

Drivers will be able to select operating modes designed around preferred driving styles such as daily commuting and spirited weekend cruising, for uncompromising electric driving. The modes adjust accelerator pedal mapping, vehicle ride height and suspension tuning. The Bolt EV concept is also designed to support DC fast charging.

“We have made tremendous strides in technologies that make it easier and more affordable for Chevrolet customers to integrate an all-electric vehicle in their daily lives,” said Barra. “The Bolt EV concept demonstrates General Motors’ commitment to electrification and the capabilities of our advanced EV technology.”

The Bolt EV concept also pushes the envelope for crossover aesthetics. Its unique proportion, with practically no front or rear overhang, makes the most of interior space and was designed to create a roomy environment for four that feels expansive. Lightweight materials, including aluminum, magnesium, carbon fiber and even woven mesh, complement the design, while driving down the curb weight to help maximize range. Aero-optimizing features such as vented rear fenders also help contribute to range.

“Form and function have never meshed so well together,” said Ed Welburn, vice president, GM Global Design. “No compromises were made when it came to aesthetics and the elements that contribute to the Bolt EV concept’s range, resulting in a unique proportion that’s sleek, efficient and obviously a Chevrolet.”

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

The Bolt EV concept’s airy interior ambience is enhanced with bold use of glass all around – as well as a full-length, frosted glass roof with unique, faceted design elements. A high beltline sweeps upward with the D-pillar, culminating in an integrated roof spoiler, for a lean, athletic stance. An advanced nano-composite rear hatch and wraparound rear window give the Bolt EV concept a distinctive appearance and flood the interior with more natural light.

High-intensity, efficient light-emitting diode (LED) headlamp and taillamp elements are housed behind jewel-like faceted lenses in which translucent elements illuminate evenly to create the signature lighting effect.

Airy, intuitive interior

Inside, the Bolt EV concept has a large feel reinforced by generous headroom and legroom dimensions. A flat, flow-through floor adds to the roominess, while a contemporary, light color scheme adds to the feeling of an open, airy cabin and conveys warmth.

The cabin’s airy, high-tech environment is reinforced with lightweight, slim-architecture seats mounted on exposed aluminum pedestals that create a floating effect. The minimalist center console “floats,” too, suspended from the front seats.

“The Bolt EV concept’s interior is intended as a sanctuary, with materials and technologies that reinforce the airy ambience and help contribute to the vehicle’s overall efficiency,” said Welburn. “It also incorporates technology in a subtler and simpler manner, for a more soothing driving experience – particularly in busy, urban environments.”

Chevrolet’s signature dual-cockpit interior layout incorporates easy-to-use technology designed to make the driving experience easier and more enjoyable. It wraps into the door panels and features a frosted and translucent appearance – and a subtle glow at night.

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

The concept’s technological intuitiveness can be accessed via a smartphone with the concept Bolt EV Connect app, which is designed to:

Allow a smartphone to perform as the key fob
Allow ride-sharing management, including reservations, vehicle location, digital key and even payment processing via the smartphone
Incorporate the concept automatic park-and-retrieval technology, which enables the driver to exit the vehicle and tell the Bolt EV concept to park itself – and when errands are completed, the Bolt EV concept can be summoned to return to the owner’s location.

A large, color 10-inch-diagonal capacitive-touch screen, with interface features, complements the concept Bolt EV Connect app. It even allows the projection of all the application and other smartphone data onto the screen.

Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world’s largest car brands, doing business in more than 140 countries and selling more than 4.8 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature engaging performance, design that makes the heart beat, passive and active safety features and easy-to-use technology, all at a value. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept (Image: Tom Moloughney/InsideEVs)

Chevrolet Bolt EV Concept (Image: Tom Moloughney/InsideEVs)

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161 responses to "Official Chevrolet Bolt Details: 200+ Miles, Starting Price Of $30,000 – Pics, Videos"

  1. Draighven says:

    2017… so far away ;( Not sure I will get a 2016 volt now…

    1. Mike999 says:

      I know.
      It’s a great city car, if you live in or near a city.

      The volt looks better for highway cruising.
      Which has more room for hunting, camping & biking equipment.

      We still need a Volt Wagon, like the Toyota V.

      1. ClarksonCote says:

        Well, here’s another question for Jay: GM states that the Bolt will likely sell aside the Spark EV, as the Spark EV will continued to be offered.

        So the million dollar question is, does that mean the Spark EV will also go national?

        At $19k after tax credit, it could easily co-exist with the Bolt, if they chose to sell it outside of CA and OR.

        1. Tom says:

          It still leaves many questions. The Spark EV is $28k and the Bolt is $30k. Both qualify for the same incentives. Why buy the Spark EV?
          On a separate subject, some Spanish speakers use “b” and “v” interchangeably. I can’t wait for the confusion that’s gonna cause here in LA! (Bolt and Volt)

    2. jone says:

      This car is a joke not b/c of the design (which is ok) but b/c of the fact that there is NO 200mi battery pack that costs $30k! It doesn’t exist, so what’s the point! If there was a concept ICE car that got 60mpg and 700hp but the engine isn’t developed yet, people would laugh. Whats the point of this concept when the MAJOR factor is cheaper 200mi battery which hasn’t been created?

      1. Jim Whitehead, M.S. says:

        Absolutely correct: This car is vaporware without 1) a 200 mile battery and 2) a fast Supercharging system. So far its an empty shell that looks like it came out of a big plastic 3-D printer. Maybe it did. So far their marketing is: Bolts are for Dolts.

        1. jone says:

          Thank you!

  2. Bro1999 says:

    Looks great…except wtf with the charge port?? No SAE combo quick charge plug???

    1. Remi says:

      … The Bolt EV concept is also designed to support DC fast charging.

    2. Robert says:

      Bro1999, Exactly! The press release is quoted “The Bolt EV concept is also designed to support DC fast charging.”, but the plug shown is a simple J1772! Looks like more of P.O.C. (Proof Of Concept) vehicle that they rushed out to show!

      Maybe they will be a bit humble and give Tesla a call, and negotiate some Supercharger deal? (Not!)

      1. Mint says:

        High speed charging is going to be a big deal for sure if they want to take on Tesla, so let’s hope GM has a robust plan there.

        Otherwise, I think it looks pretty good. The front has some goofy elements from the i3, but overall I like the Bolt better.

  3. IDK says:

    Tesla has nothing to worry about. Looks like a Honda Fit EV….with a little Chevy Spark mixed in.

    1. peet365 says:

      For a city car I think it looks quite OK. Let Tesla first bring Model 3 by 2017 and then we can discuss if they have something to worry about.
      It would be interesting to see how Bolt will compare to Volt, because pricewise they will be quite close.

      1. James M says:

        Hats off to GM. They will be riding the coat tails of both Tesla and BMW excellently. And I mean that in a positive way. Now there’s another 200+ mile EV to watch for in 2017. Also, “Form and function have never meshed so well together,” do you spot the i3 ripoff, even including the same electric orange showcase color? But thank you, no need for a REX. To top it off, “designed for attainability not exclusivity”, which only Nissan can attest to. Great strategy GM. Tesla, BMW and Nissan will all have to step up there game.

    2. QCO says:

      Well you don’t know what a Model 3 looks like yet, so comparisons are hypothetical.

      To achieve the mass market price point with 200 miles means a small and light weight vehicle. The same design constraints apply to Tesla.

      1. IDK says:

        I wouldn’t bet against Tesla / Elon. For design, function and range…Tesla hasn’t disappointed.

        1. DonC says:

          AFAIK Tesla has never hit an announced price point or a release date. For example, the Model S was supposed to cost $45K and the Model X was supposed to be released in 2013.

          If you ignore all failures then yes, Elon has never disappointed.

          1. Omar Sultan says:

            Perhaps a bit of research is order – the announced target for the Model S was under $50K and the original S40 was $49,900. The initial delivery date for the Model X was early 2015 and had now slipped to Q3 2015.

          2. Get Real says:

            Don C has once again let his irrational dislike of Elon Musk cloud his judgement on things Tesla.

  4. Lou Grinzo says:

    If that’s $30K(-ish) pre-tax-break, then it’s definitely a game changer and the biggest plug-in car news since the Volt and Leaf hit the market. (And speaking of the Leaf, this GM announcement greatly increases the odds of Nissan doing something much more aggressive with the Leaf 2.0 than most of us, including me, expected.)

    The Bolt interior is not to my liking, to put it very mildly. I’m hoping this is yet another example of a concept car having a WTF-esque interior that magically transforms into something much more conventional by the time the car hits the market.

    Likewise, they have time to do something about that weird nose.

    But all nitpicking aside, 200 miles + $30K = big, fat win for everyone.

    1. SIvad says:

      The rumor is that the $30K is after tax credit. That is from an earlier article here in insideevs.

      To me this looks like a replacement for the i3 rather than something that will compete against the Model 3. It has similar proportions and 4 seats. I would hardly call it a crossover but more of a tall compact like the i3. From the video the cargo depth looks the same as the Volt but with more vertical volume. Might give it 18-20 cu. ft. which isn’t really crossover numbers but I’ll take it. But it will have 200 miles range and come in $10K less than the i3. It even is painted in that same burnt orange the i3 debuted with.

      1. Gregory Lemieux says:

        My thoughts exactly. The interior styling and seating for 4 makes this look more like an i3 competitor. It will probably compete well against the Leaf too, but by 2017 Nissan might have something better on offer especially given that the Tesla Model 3 targets are likely pushing them to up their game. Based on that I’m not sure I’d call this a “game-changer;” maybe if it came out next year, yeah, but in 2017? Not so much.

        1. scott franco says:

          Good answer. 2017 is late. But Tesla will be even later…

          1. kdawg says:

            And I didn’t see any other ~$30K 200 Mile BEV concepts at the show… (looking at you Nissan & Tesla)

  5. Josh says:

    “designed for attainability, not exclusivity”, hmm was that a shot a Tesla?

    “particularly in busy, urban environments”, I wonder if China (not US) is the primary target?

    1. Mike999 says:

      If the East Coast, and CA is “China”, then yes.

    2. ffbj says:

      A shot across the bow at Tesla? That is the way I took it too.

      1. TomArt says:

        That’s exactly what that statement was. It is frustrating and unreasonable, because it has been TMC’s goal from the very beginning (nearly 10 years ago now), to push the technology and cost down to mass appeal.

        These sorts of comments like that press release are sophomoric.

    3. Puzzlegal says:

      Doesn’t “electric” use more carbon than gas in China? I thought most of their electricity came from inefficient coal plants, and what with the loss of power moving from the plant to a home to a car, the carbon footprint of an electric car was actually worse than IC there, unlike North America.

      Of course, maybe they plan to sell it as a performance car, not a “green” car.

      1. PapaDock says:

        The “electricity from coal” argument has been disproved many times. Even Forbes says it’s an even tie with a 40 mpg internal combustion vehicle, after they plugged in pessimistic numbers for EV watts per mile.

        But China is putting major investment in renewable energy. China has committed to installing 1.3 GW of new renewable energy generation each week (or about 67 GW annually) for the next 15 years in order to meet its carbon reduction goals.

        One benefit of an electric vehicle is that it is the only type of vehicle that will get cleaner to drive the older it gets.

  6. Stuart22 says:

    Wow. Just wow.

  7. Robert says:

    No quick charge atm a waste of money. Looking forward to the Model III

    1. ClarksonCote says:

      The article clearly states it has a quick charge option available. Sounds like the same model as the Leaf, optional DC fast charging.

    2. DonC says:

      Only a masochist would take a car like this on long trips. It’s not designed for that. But it will support DC charging so, if you want to be uncomfortable you’ll have that opportunity.

      1. Get Real says:

        Once again Don C has allowed his personal experiences and emotions based on his Leaf to cloud his judgment on DCFC.

      2. Bill Howland says:

        Oh I don’t know DonC, maybe the real car as manufactured might not be as bad as you fear…

        Look what they did with the VOLT, and, its not necessarily exactly what I or others here want (but to me GM has listened to the broad cross section of owners):

        1). More Seats (5)
        2). Easier to operate controls.
        3). 50 miles all electric range.
        4). 41 mpg on regular (effectively 47 mpg compared to the 2011-15 premium fueled model)
        5). Still one of the safest cars ever.
        6). More acceleration.
        7). Over 400 miles overall.
        8). Pleasant styling, like several Japanese and Korean models.
        9). Even less noise and vibration.

        10). (Most owners of the volt charge using existing 110 volt facilities, so they made small improvements where the Majority will use it).. Some, including myself, would like a dual charger option, but, for me at least its a small deal. The added range means there is less and less of a time that I need to charge quickly.

        The actual in-product volt, with the assumed Sae – combo jack, may not be as bad as you think. And 200 miles of range lets you go places you don’t have to worry about anyway. I know that first hand from almost 4 years with my ROadster.

    3. TomArt says:

      Agreed, Robert – when you get to 150, 200 mile ranges and higher, anything less than Tesla’s superchargers is a joke.

  8. Greg says:

    Love it or hate it (I like it) this is great news for EVs. This shows that within the next 5 years EVs will become affordable for the masses and people will have the option of letting go of oil for commuting transportation. And for some people this car would suit all their needs.

    I’m a Tesla fan but bravo to GM for pushing the envelope. Now over to you Nissan and Tesla.

    1. Lou Grinzo says:

      Ding! Ding! Ding! We have a winnah!

      This is exactly the way we should be looking at all plug-in car announcements for at least the next 10 years: Not just what is it and at what price, but what response will it provoke from competitors.

      This announcement represents a step-change in the value proposition for EVs, and it puts a big honkin’ onus on other companies to respond. In particular, this sets up one heck of a street fight between Chevy and Nissan from now until the Bolt and the Leaf 2.0 ship.

      1. Greg says:

        Exciting times for EVs and the push to vastly reduce, or say farewell completely, to our dependance on oil.

    2. Josh says:

      +1

      Lets hope the VW/Audi 200 mile EV comes soon also. Four vehicles (including LEAF 2.0) competing on design/features/price is what we want to see.

    3. x says:

      +1 on all counts.

    4. scott franco says:

      I agree, its a big step forward. Now it is all about the charger. How much (power), what type (Chademo or Can’t Charge Somewhere).

  9. Bro1999 says:

    Looks like a 4 seater?

  10. shawn marshall says:

    why now? will scavenge their own sales. do they think this will slow down the
    leaf?

    look for a response.

    1. MTN Ranger says:

      The Volt and the 200 Miles BEV are two different markets. There are vehement Volt owners who will never settle for even a 300-400 mile BEV. There are BEV purists who will never look at the Volt.

  11. M Hovis says:

    Just noticed the flush handles in the video.

    1. Josh says:

      Ha, we are on the same page Mark. New standard handle for EVs?

  12. Josh says:

    Did anyone notice that the Bolt has door handles that eerily resemble Model S?

    1. Alaa says:

      I don’t think that Elon will mind! He gave the patent away. And here is what I think: GM will not be able to sell MANY of this car; simply because they do not have enough batteries! They have to gamble and make a large order say from LG etc. but even then Tesla will win since Tesla has ZERO cost for the energy in the Giga Factory. No body else has that. A big advantage.

      1. Greg says:

        Plus Tesla has their vast Supercharger network. Nobody even comes close to that. Tesla is the only company that understands and knows how to achieve mass acceptance of EVs.

      2. Josh says:

        I don’t agree. I think GM will get as many batteries as they need. The really important factor for GM is can LG hit the same $/kWh that Tesla is targeting with the GigaFactory?

        If Bolt isn’t at least as profitable as their other vehicles, they won’t be pushing to sell it.

        1. Alaa says:

          How will their battery be at the same level price wise if Tesla has free energy for its factory?

          1. Josh says:

            (stop me if that was intended to be sarcasm)

            “Free energy”. That just doesn’t exist. I am not sure if you are referring to solar/wind Tesla intends to use or the energy cost break in the Nevada incentive package.

            Either way, I am sure LG could pull off a similar offer on a Chinese manufacturing facility. I don’t the energy cost will be the deciding factor on $/kWh.

            1. Alaa says:

              Yes I was referring to the solar and wind. Now if you look at the map of the world you will see that Nevada is the best spot. It is also near the critical mass for labor. No one in the world has that. Not even China. As for water Tesla has it under its feet in Nevada.

              1. Josh says:

                Even though there is no fuel cost, there is still a cost for the energy from wind/solar. Capex and O&M need to get amortized out over the life of equipment.

                I can’t speak for solar, but current 20 year Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) for wind are in the $35 / MWh to $50 / MWh (3.5 c/kWh – 5.0 c/kWh).

                As far as location, west Texas has the lowest PPAs in the country, and is a pretty awesome solar resource as well.

          2. peet365 says:

            why do you think Tesla will have free energy in gigafactory?

            1. Billy Bob says:

              You know the $5 B free Gigafactory

          3. Mikael says:

            Power is just a small portion of the price. And surely GM has some tax breaks and stuff in some state too.

            1. Alaa says:

              Small or not it is a cost.

        2. Mark says:

          GM is one of the largest companies on the planet. I think that they’ll have little trouble getting batteries for something that they want.

        3. IDK says:

          @Josh …honest question here. Was / is the Volt profitable?

          1. Josh says:

            Its just my opinion, but I think Volt 1.0 was about break even on gross margin (forgetting about R&D). Or at least it was far less profitable than a Cruze.

            GM really faded on the Volt push after they didn’t hit their initial volume targets. Here is to hoping Volt 2.0 starts stomping all over Prius sales and GM really gets behind it.

            1. Mike999 says:

              You can get a Prius for $25,000 which really helps it’s sales. But, yes, I hope you’re right.

              1. Josh says:

                If Volt 2.0 starts at $30k, that is $22,500 after tax credits. If you can drive it off the lot for less than a Prius, I think it will put a major dent in Prius demand.

    2. Anthony says:

      This is a concept car, wouldn’t be surprised if those handles get ditched by bean counters on the production version.

  13. Mark C says:

    I wonder if ” designed for attainability, not exclusivity,” means they will sell it at all dealerships who sell the Volt {nationally}, or all dealerships who sell the Spark EV {CARB states}.

    Add DCFC and this could very well be my next car.

    1. ClarksonCote says:

      The article says DCFC is available. Though, to me, it would be nice to just make it standard on any long range BEV.

    2. TomArt says:

      That statement was a childish jab at Tesla.

  14. Alex says:

    Woah, that will be a game changer for 30.000 dollar before incentives? I like the design, clean, sporty much better than today electric cars.

    1. Steve says:

      Maybe they meant $30k after incentives? They didnt’ really say. Hopefully is is $30k before incentives — 22.5k!

  15. David Murray says:

    Well, I don’t care for the external look. Then again, not surprising being I’m not a big SUV or CUV fan anyway. Despite that, I’m thrilled at the news. I think we can assume this vehicle is being made because of the success of the Nissan Leaf and Tesla Model-S.

    Nissan will definitely have to up the range on the Leaf for the next generation. They have 2 years to get it done. Shouldn’t be a problem. In fact, with the new Volt coming out with 50 miles of range, I suspect the Leaf will definitely suffer in sales when the Volt hits the road.

  16. Warren says:

    Not a slippery two seater, but I could live with this. At least it isn’t big, or ostentatious.

  17. kdawg says:

    Nationwide sales… finally.
    I wonder what GM is going to do about Nationwide CCS charging? Really that is the only thing Tesla has on them at this point… # of chargers and charging rate. And before everyone goes “all Tesla” on me, GM has just shown a concept EV that will go 200 miles and cost $30K. Tesla has not. Until they do, all we can do, is speculate on what it will be.

    1. Josh says:

      I still think the Tesla software/infotainment system is a generation ahead of anything GM has shown.

      Nissan is really the bigger target with this vehicle. Everyone focuses on the Model 3, but LEAF will be the first “affordable” EV to market with 150+ mile range. It should be around a full year before Bolt hits the streets.

      Nissan usually holds their cards closer to their chest than GM. I will be excited to see their answer.

      1. kdawg says:

        I think the Leaf has more room than the Bolt, but maybe the longer range version will not? Until we see what kind of infotainment the Bolt has, it’s hard to speculate. I do like the looks of the Telsa graphics. The Gen2 Volt graphics look like an improvement as well.

      2. scott franco says:

        If that is so its because the makers are pushing each other. Competition wins again.

    2. QCO says:

      Yes, “nationwide” is an important statement that signals the end of compliance cars at GM.

      As for charging, the presence of just a J1772 in a small opening with a statement of QCDC support suggests there is something yet to be said on that topic. I’d like to believe co-operation with Tesla on both the plug and and the Supercharging network is still a possibility before this hits the street, but we’ll have to wait and see.

    3. x says:

      +1
      +1

      It is good that they’re pushing Tesla now to move on the Model3 front, hopefully Nissan, Ford will join the race, it would make a really interesting 2016.

    4. ffbj says:

      GM has shown a concept/prototype. I beg to differ when you say that all Tesla has over GM is their sc structure. Tesla is preeminent maker of ev’s in our time, the Leaf
      non-withstanding. They currently have no real challengers for the space in which they operate. What ev, competes with the Model D?

      1. kdawg says:

        The space that Tesla operates is cars that cost 6-figures. Like I said, GM just showed us a $30k 200 mile BEV. If/when Tesla responds, we can compare apples to apples. If Tesla matches GMs specs (or even exceeds them in some areas), and keeps the price the same, then I would give the edge to Tesla based on the SC network. I would still be a bit worried buying one due to them still going through learning/growing pains, but I’d prob still get a Model 3 if it was competitive.

    5. JakeY says:

      I think you have things backwards. GM may have unveiled a concept car (and one quite far from production, as if you examine the details, for example the DC charging claim, you will notice the port and cutout on the actual car doesn’t actually support DC Charging), but that’s far from a significant commitment.

      For one, they have no promised release date (while Tesla does), and they don’t have a multi-billion factory well under construction for this car (like Tesla does).

      1. MTN Ranger says:

        GM’s (LG’s) battery factory is already built and has excess capacity. Additional cells can be shipped from Korea and another new factory in China.

        1. JakeY says:

          While they can conceivably configure the factory building the Volt battery cells to build cells for the Bolt, the actual cell doesn’t exist yet. It’s still under development according to LG:
          http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=274204&dfpPParams=ind_184,industry_auto,aid_274204&dfpLayout=article

          And WSJ says GM’s factory when finished will have the capacity to build packs for 60k Volts or 20k Bolts per year, or a mixture of the two (but not both).

          However, that level of commitment is still quite far from Tesla’s as their plant will be able to supply 500k Tesla packs per year.

      2. kdawg says:

        A drive-able concept car is a long way from not even showing a line on a piece of paper. And we all know how Tesla is at meeting their dates.

        1. JakeY says:

          They are building a $5 billion battery factory, so I think that’s a lot more than just a line on a paper. And even though Tesla might not meet their dates, at least they have one, while GM doesn’t.

          1. kdawg says:

            But those batteries will be used for the Model S, X and grid power as well. We haven’t even seen a sketch of the Model 3. In fact, Tesla has gone quite silent on the matter. Maybe Elon will say something tomorrow at the Automotive News World Congress.

            1. JakeY says:

              Over at TMC there’s been discussion on Tesla’s unveiling strategy. Basically there’s some consensus that it might benefit Tesla more to follow an approach similar to Apple, which is to release details only very close to launch and avoid building false expectations too early on (there’s been plenty of complaints about this by reservation holders for previous announcements). And Tesla likely is following this strategy already.

              They have been relative quiet on the Model X, even though if they were to follow what they did with the Model S, they should be showing a lot more prototypes and hyping the car up by now. Elon already alluded to this by saying the current strategy is to sell whatever they can sell now, rather than hyping up something that they can’t offer for sale yet.

              Even back then, Tesla already have shown they won’t build “concept” cars that aren’t very close to what the final production version is like, while for major automakers, concept cars are a dime a dozen and mostly have no bearing on what they do on a production car.

  18. James says:

    So fun at this stage – to view this little CUV with an eye of reality. Remember when the fist Volt concept showed up? How Jetsons it was, and how the entire vehicle was redesigned for the realities of aero, safety, efficiency and affordability? This is a well-times shot across the bow to Tesla. Noted are the attainability vs. exclusivity shots.

    Basic overview – it’s i3-sized, but better looking, in my opinion. Regular doors fr and rear, a big plus. Looks like a T-pack battery – so easier for LG to build alongside it’s Volt packs ( see 4 seater vs. battery skateboard ). This fact is disappointing – but they have to build this on a Sonic platform, mind you.

    Envision a more standard GM plasticky interior with some plastic chrome to style things up a bit – they will have similar shapes and design concepts in the real deal. As for materials? Don’t expect composites except possibly the hood and rear hatch. The glass roof is bye-bye for $30,000…

    Just a couple observations on what, I’m sure, is a more developed half-way point to what the “Bolt” or whatever focus groups talk them into calling it – will become. I hope it keeps it’s alluring shapes front and rear – I pick up a tiny bit of Corvette ( check the headlights – vs. today’s Corvette taillights! ), some gen1 Volt ( front undergrille and blacked out lower hatch ) – and some modern themes ( love the door panels – wish Volt2 had those instead of those plain plastic ?s they chose! ).

    All-in, it’s a big segment to go after and it would sell well, esp. if they can offer seating for 5, instead of the 4 shown. 200 mile range gets you past many of the limitations of an 80 mile BEV. A big question is when that big charging or QC opportunity question looms it’s ugly head.

    This surely shows BMW what i3 could’ve been.

    1. MTN Ranger says:

      Photos show that the floor is flat, so most likely skateboard battery shape.

    2. tedfredrick says:

      Starting at 30K. Final cost after otions a differen story

      1. tedfredrick says:

        Sorry for the spelling. I will proof read next time.

  19. James says:

    Forgot to mention the nod to i3 is pret-ty strong. Down to the wheel design and the color they chose to show the concept in.

    Some here hate the front design and that’s understandable because we’re creatures of habit and have been raised seeing cars with gaping holes ( mouths ) up front to suck in cooling air. Tesla had to incorporate a faux grille to cool people’s jets. GM surely will embellish this little CUV with some sort of decoration to fill in that LED show they put up there. Remember too – that in many states and countries there shall be a license plate up there to fill things in a bit.

    1. Josephus says:

      I really like the in-your-face protest of the front grill. It’s subversive in a proud and cool way to me.

  20. James says:

    Sorry they had to pay a graphics team to come up with that Bolt logo, but that name’s got-ta go! A bolt brings visions of something that screws onto a nut! – Ha! Or what you do when your blind date ends up looking like Freddie Kruger!

    Any reference to lightning, I’m afraid, would be lost – I think a bolt is also a roll of cloth from which clothing is made?

    Anyway – GM, ditch that name before you proceed, pls.

    1. kdawg says:

      What would you name it?

      1. scott franco says:

        “only a nut drives a Bolt”?

      2. James says:

        I don’t want them to call it “Vapor”.

        Word from the NAIAS floor to Chelsea Sexton’s ears was it’s a kind-of, don’t-count-it-out, lots-of-these-get-built sort of message.

        I think they will feel they have to carry on development since the Gigafactory is going up as we speak, and this could be a thorn in Elon’s side.

        1. kdawg says:

          I like Bolt, or maybe Phase.. since we are in a transition phase between ICEs and EVs (and its an EE term).

    2. Josephus says:

      If the zero-sixty acceleration is exciting, it will earn its name. If not, the name will seem hollow.

  21. James says:

    Remember – GM first named the EV-1 the “Impact”! ( ! )

    What – where – they – thinking?! They got ribbed quite a bit in auto media, and it wasn’t too long that it’s name changed to EV-1.

    Doesn’t it make you wonder whose in charge of those things over at GM?

  22. James says:

    Sorry for the typos – it’s like “blank” O-Clock here on the Left Coast. I couldn’t stay away from the PC — I mean…just LOOK at this stuff!

    It is my passion.

  23. unbiased says:

    ugh- but why does it have to be ugly?

  24. x says:

    Looks really nice, has fast charging. The only piece missing would be an agreement with Tesla to use theri Superchargers and maybe build some (mathc tesla’s number?) of their own That would be really , really great! And while you’re at it join the good fight to dump the dealers cartel. I would GLADLY pay any automaker the 2-3000$ , the dealer’s cut, instead of a dealer for just for handing over the “keys” . At least an automker risks , bets, invests so much in making a vehicle , it deserves the money the customer is willing to pay.

    Even without this (Supercharger or CCS charger network) , it is indeed really a vehicle that I do consider .
    Nice one, GM, I just hope that no changes/delays will occur. Indeed a good news!

  25. Marshal G says:

    I like it a lot. I hope this lights a fire under both Nissan and Tesla to put something on display this year for us to compare with this.

  26. tom moloughney says:

    In person it looks like the child of a Honda Fit and an i3. I like it though.

    1. taser54 says:

      Thanks for the pictures.

    2. Best description I’ve read yet. Mixed kids are the cutest.

      Great work on the photos Tom. Major kudos!

    3. evnow says:

      In Terms of size – is it bigger or smaller than Leaf ? Is it 4 or 5 seater ?

  27. shrink says:

    No sun visors? Weird.

  28. Kaleb says:

    I’m glad they plan to make this car, but I was hoping it would be a little larger car. This one looks smaller than my LEAF.

  29. MDEV says:

    Way nicer than BMW i3, Tesla has the advantage of be perceived as a luxury brand and performance.I love this type of news, the hit is on.

  30. Steve says:

    I like it. I hope it is a little bit bigger than a Fit. Hopefully it’s a “compact” and not a “subcompact.”

    If it really has that starting price and 200 mile range, and half-decent acceleration — I think it’ll sell a lot. This is really news in the EV world.

  31. DonC says:

    By more than doubling the expected range for roughly the same money, the Bolt sets a new standard for a very usable electric car for local driving.

    Decent design given that it’s a subcompact. Spartan interior but at this price point you’re buying four seats and a steering wheel riding on a battery. LOL Nissan and BMW will have to seriously step up their game. (With its cost structure Tesla can’t play in this space).

    Competition is a wonderful thing.

    1. kdawg says:

      I wouldn’t put too much weight on the interior design. It’s just a concept. Expect a more traditional vehicle at production.

      1. DonC says:

        But they usually take things out when they move to production. Not much here to “take out”. LOL

        1. MTN Ranger says:

          What are you talking about? Compare the Volt concept to production; the same thing will happen.

      2. Taser54 says:

        When it reaches production, it will have an interior similar to the buick encore, imho.

    2. I love the minimalist interior. Sure hope they don’t muck with that, it’s perfect.

  32. Guy Gravel says:

    Weird that they show us a prototype with minimal Touch sensitive buttons when on the other hand they show us the new gen Volt that goes backwards with physical buttons… so what’s the message here?
    Other than that, i like it a lot, Go GM!
    On the other hand TSLA stock is taking another hit….

    1. Puzzlegal says:

      minimal touch-sensitive buttons look sexy, and make a good “concept”. But they are fussy to use — you have to look at them. Physical buttons you push are better in practice.

      Good for GM for adding them to the Volt II. The fussiness of the console is the major complaint of my friend who has a Volt.

  33. Chris says:

    I hope it fits tall people.

    Finally an all electric with a good range for a decent price!

  34. Rick Danger says:

    I would take its looks any day over the i3. PLEASE tell me it’s RWD.
    It’s no Model ≡ killer, but it doesn’t have to be to be a big seller for GM.
    It puts the ball squarely in Nissan’s court to up their game on LEAF v2.
    Maybe GM is serious after all… this certainly seems to be an impressive effort on their part.

    1. DonC says:

      It’s built on the Gamma II platform which is the platform for small front wheel drive vehicles. So I’m thinking it’s “probably” not RWD. LOL

      1. Taser54 says:

        I’ve read mixed messages. Some agree with you, others say it will be built on the forthcoming sonic platform.

        1. kdawg says:

          Rick “It’s no Model ≡ killer”
          ———-

          Until we actually see a Model 3, that is yet TBD.

      2. Josh says:

        The drivetrain specs are even more spartan than the interior. I was hoping to hear something like energy, power, efficiency targets, and drive configuration.

        I thought they usually offer up that type of info (even if it isn’t actually inside) on ICE concepts.

  35. FS says:

    I want battery specs. 200 miles demands at least 55 kWh.

  36. Ryan says:

    In 2017 I envision myself preferring a 4-yr old Model S with 60,000mi for $45k over this.

  37. Taser54 says:

    Looks like the quickcharger cut out was installed upside down (yes I know there is no QC plug installed). Oh well, concept car.

  38. scott franco says:

    Transparent roof? KerWow…

  39. wavelet says:

    Take note, everyone. This is JUST A CONCEPT.

    Sure, it’s nice to hear that GM is targeting a 200mi mid-priced global BEV in ~2 years’ time, but there are no real details here.

    As such, this is a huge letdown.

    In none of the InsideEVs articles, or the GM microsite, are there any specs whatsoever for dimensions, weights, battery capacity, drivetrain performance etc. The only number anywhere is that 200mi range (presumably expected EPA rating, but who knows. They don’t say)
    Who give’s a flying @#$% about how the dash looks or the glass roof in the absence of the actual important stuff?

    1. ClarksonCote says:

      Umm… Except that no other automaker even has a concept at this point for a 200+ mile BEV around $30k for 2017.

      So while you may be let down, GM is still in the lead here.

      1. wavelet says:

        You misunderstand me. I’m not criticizing GM here — they’ve made a very significant step in the sense of “we believe in the BEV as a valid global market segment” (the Spark EV on its own doesn’t quite make the same statement, as a single EV model can eb considered toe-dipping; having a long-range, purpose-designed 2nd model is a lot more).

        However, this is far from an actual product announcement — there are no actual details — and I was criticizing InsideEVs and other blogs for not pointing it out.

        1. taser54 says:

          Powertrain and electronics are production ready. Waiting for LG to provide the cells.

  40. Autumn says:

    That’s finally the mileage and price point that will get me to buy and stop leasing. And I get that it’s a concept car, but good grief, why to they always have to dork it up to make sure we all know it’s efficient (Tesla excluded)? That’s exactly why I’m in a Volt instead of a Leaf. That and my 60 mile commute. Why can’t I just have an orange Volt that gets 200 miles?

    1. ClarksonCote says:

      I think the problem is they can’t fit another 150% of batteries in the small space the engine occupies. Space for the batteries within the Volt is your limiting factor.

      1. Autumn says:

        Yeah, probably. Then I’d take a slightly larger Volt that got 200 electric miles in that case, even if it had to be orange. Nissan did the same thing, it kills me. Do I get a pretty new electric Altima? No. Its either a regular Altima or Mr. Magoo’s old car. I should email them.

  41. J. kanson says:

    Transparent roof? Black interior? That will be an oven!

  42. Lindsay Patten says:

    It will be interesting to see what effect the prospect of a 200 mile BEV in 2017 has on sales of the Leaf and i3 between now and then. It’s hard to picture buying an 80 mile range car in 2016 knowing you can get a 200 mile range car in 2017.

    As 2017 draws nearer, what sort of discount will they have to offer on 80 mile range cars to get people to buy them over waiting for the 200 mile range car?

  43. Pedro says:

    Looks like an Honda Fit, but less aerodynamic.

  44. Pedro says:

    Looks like a Honda Fit, but less aerodynamic.

  45. evnow says:

    Nice to see GM trying to make a non-compliance only BEV. As I’ve been saying 200 will become the new “100” mile BEV. All new BEVs in a couple of years will have “200” mile range.

    BUT, it is a mistake for GM to have shown this in Jan 2015, along with Volt 2. This might make people to wait 2 more years before getting a plugin.

    In 2 years time we’ll have a few more “200” mile BEVs (Leaf 2 etc).

  46. ampzilla says:

    all gm has to due is install dcfc at all there dealerships/ say bye bye to tesla

  47. Josephus says:

    = $42,670 and up MSRP is my guess.

    Math:
    $30,000 starting around

    +$9,500 It’s probably taking into account both Federal $7500 and CA $2500. I would if I were them.
    ——-
    $39,500

    +$1,170 DC charge option. Statements and pictures suggest that the demo/concept shown does not have this option. Nissan has their upgrade charging package for $1,170 as an option on their S trim.
    ——–
    $40,670

    I’d also give them +$2,000 leeway for the “around” language.

    Sooooooo…..

    = $42,670 and up MSRP is my guess.

    +??? trim levels, package options. This puts it very close to i3 price territory. I bet fully loaded will get up near $48K-$49K.

  48. James says:

    This introduction was strange, now that you mention it.

    Here it is, the Volt2’s big day – a car GM will actually sell in 50 states and nearly all dealerships…and they whisk by it, show a maelstrom of glitzy graphic mashups – and equally hype a concept of a car that just may or may not be a couple to a few years out that would be a preference to a good hunk of Volt buyers…

    Meanwhile, the light dims on Volt, and it sits on it’s turntable in the dark! The Bolt got far more “oohs” and “aahs”….

    Anybody else think that’s dumb?

    Hmmm… At some point you have to wonder if GM really wants Volt to succeed.

    1. Ziv says:

      The Volt has always been treated like a red headed step child. Always. And unveiling the Bolt on the same days as the Gen II Volt was no accident. GM is sandbagging their own car because they don’t make enough money on each Volt sold. They want the halo but they don’t want to have to forgo more profitable sales, also.

  49. Steve V says:

    Man, that thing is UGLY!
    Good thing by the time this comes out the Tesla 3 should be out. I don’t think they will sell more than 10 of these.

  50. Richard says:

    Häääh,with a type 1 charging socket???

  51. Frank says:

    It is neat to see what the designers can do but realistically I don’t see how they can do that roof – cost, heat and safety would be prohibitive for a car in the $30K range. The problem is that people see and droll over the design, then when it hits the showroom floor, it is so scaled back that the interest is no longer there. I think it does more harm than good to “futuristicize” a car far beyond what it could/will be…

    1. FFY says:

      Actually, I think the designers were really lazy on this one. It looks exactly like an i3 (proportions, waist line, wheels etc., even down to the double-U shaped headlights), just with GM branding and some Honda design cues. Very derivative.

      I’d be more interested to see where they plan to fit the large battery.

  52. arne-nl says:

    Charge port is still on the wrong side. Should be at the front.

    1. Ziv says:

      Sometimes the front is a better spot for plugging in and sometimes it is horrible. Having the plug on the drivers side is always ok, and never terrible. I say that because I have to back in to my garage spot and plugging in if the plug was in the front would be a nightmare. As it is it is merely an extra couple steps. Also, a minor front end collision has more expensive ramifications if the plug is up there.
      I can see that front end plugging can be good at times, but I like drivers side front quarter panel better.

  53. Priusmaniac says:

    They should have switched the battery between the Volt 2 and the Bolt, it would have made a greater Volt 2, with more ev range and more leg room in the center backseat place.

  54. reguest says:

    a 90k car is still a 30k car if you lose 60k on each one produced.

  55. Lou says:

    Now that we have seen this concept car, can we assume that GM really has found (or is finding out)how to reduce battery costs significantly? If so, I can see a Malibu EV that gets 150-175 miles. There’s your Volt Gen 3. Ditto for many of their other mid size vehicles, including smaller pickups abd SUV’s/CUV’s. Although we all proclaim to need a 300 mile range EV, in fact half of that range, if it represented true “winter driving” and higher speeed highway driving, would satisfy a large number of drivers. The option of some sort of QC, whether it be CCS or a Tesla SC buy in, bridges that gap between short range and medium range cars.

    Lou

  56. Rick says:

    Love the ‘bulby’, upright, no bumper design!

  57. P0litik@llyInkorrect.ru says:

    This is ripoff styling from the “Blue Car”.
    http://www.pininfarina.com/en/pininfarina_bluecar/

    Nice try GM.