Nissan Presents The Future Of Piloted Driving In The LEAF, Coming Soon – Video

1 year ago by Mark Kane 12

Autonomous Nissan LEAF prototype

Autonomous Nissan LEAF prototype

Nissan for several years now has been developing autonomous driving technologies, with a goal to introduce truly autonomous driving by 2020.

While assisted driving (that requires driver attention), is soon to be introduced on more and more models, full autonomous transportation would free up the driver to do something else while behind the wheel – like “help the kids with homework” on the way to school.

The most common test mule for Nissan, in both the U.S. and Japan, is the all-electric LEAF.

Introducing Nissan Intelligent Driving with Piloted Drive

Nissan Intelligent Driving with Piloted Drive helps you drive smarter, safer, and with more confidence.  Without the stress and inefficiency of driving as you know it, Piloted Drive makes it easy and fun to get around.

At Nissan, our mission is to make driving more enjoyable and safer. Not just for a few, but for everyone. By 2020 you’ll find multiple models with Piloted Drive in major mass production in the US, Japan, China, and Europe.”

Autonomous Nissan LEAF at 2014 Geneva Motor Show

Autonomous Nissan LEAF at 2014 Geneva Motor Show

Hat tip to Adrian W!

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12 responses to "Nissan Presents The Future Of Piloted Driving In The LEAF, Coming Soon – Video"

  1. Doggydogworld says:

    Piloted Drive? What a dumb term. We’ve had that for over a century…..

    1. Anon says:

      Shhhh. My horse suspects he’s being replaced…

  2. David Murray says:

    I still don’t understand how these systems would work if there were millions of these on the road all using the same lasers and radar, etc. I would think with all of those active scanning systems, they would interfere with each other.

    1. AlphaEdge says:

      They use a combination of systems. I know Nissan is using a number of camera’s and interference is not an issue there. Also any laser based system (Google using that) can’t suffer from interference. Radar using radio waves can be an issue, but that usually used for close up collision detection.

      All these systems are taking readings from 60 to hundreds of times a second at the very least, so all that feedback helps override false readings. It more a case of the interpretation of the data. The AI and data used to understand what the sensors are seeing.

    2. Because every car will know precisely what every other car around it wants to do or is planning to do and they’ll all be jolly tolerant and considerate towards each other with no other goal than to simply get their car and occupants (assuming there are any) to their destination safely and efficiently… UNLIKE most human pilots of motorcars on the roads today!

      Ergo, accidents will almost disappear and roads will become safer and more efficient for everyone, insurance costs will plummet along with the cost to the taxpayer of accident-related hold-ups and accident-related injuries.

      No more need for traffic lights, traffic police or street signs…

      Public transport will be free (driver and fuel makes up about 70% of the cost of running a bus) and taxis will become so cheap, safe and efficient that half the poputlation that currently own a car will cease to bother with the cost and hassle of doing so. Instead, when they need to go somewhere, they’ll just get their smartphone out and dial up an autonomous taxi that’ll be outside their door in 2 minutes ready to go wherever they choose – from one mile to one thousand.

      Golly, brave new world here we come!

  3. Boukman says:

    I’m not sure if semi-autonomous driving should be made widely available. People being people, some will stop monitoring the road as soon as they enable it and this will lead to accidents. We should wait for fully autonomous cars. Hopefully I’m wrong on this and the technology is advanced enough that it’s a non-issue. Otherwise, I hope there is some safety built in, like one hand on the steering wheel at all times or it gets deactivated.

    1. zzzzzzzzzz says:

      That is what e.g. Mercedes cars were doing for many years before Musk invented it all over again.
      10 seconds after you remove hands off wheel, you get a beep, and 5 seconds later autosteering/cruise control deactivates.

      Allowing driving without hands when the system can’t cope with emergencies by itself is asking for trouble. Driver can’t cope with emergencies either if he is snoozing and distracted, and don’t even have hands on the wheel. By the time he will focus it will be too late.

  4. Anon says:

    Fugtinomous Driving? ™

  5. shawn marshall says:

    fatal accidents will go way down
    insurance rates will decline
    a few computers with 3-4 times redundancy will have more technology than a computer controlled moon flight

    twelve hour drives to Chicago will become a snap

    What’s not to like?

  6. DNAinaGoodWay says:

    My back up camera is marginal at best in rain, ice, or snow, even a little dust. How will multiple sensors handle that?

    Given Nissan’s record with NissanConnect and the nav system’s deficiencies, I won’t be first in line for AD.

    2020 seems ambitious, I’ll be happy if they even have multiple models of EVs by then.

  7. Joe says:

    At minute 1:31 you can see a nice (not current Leaf generation) interior.
    Is that maybe signalling what will come in the Leaf 2?
    Looks pretty good, IMHO.

  8. Ian says:

    No one cares… Just put out a 60kwh battery already and announce upgradable battery packs for your older models… It’s all we want.