Nissan & BMW Team Up To Deploy 120 Dual (CHAdeMO & CCS) Fast Chargers In U.S.

1 year ago by Eric Loveday 42

Nissan and BMW Join Forces On Fast Charging

Nissan and BMW Join Forces On Fast Charging

In a joint announcement released just moments ago, Nissan & BMW declared their intent to join forces to expand the fast charging infrastructure in the U.S. The deal involves Greenlots too.

Here are some of the major details:

  • Total of 120 dual port (CHAdeMO & CCS) 50 kW fast chargers installed in 19 U.S. states
  • Greenlots-networked stations
  • 19 states include California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, New York, North and South Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin.

Some quotage:

Cliff Fietzek, Manager Connected eMobility, BMW of North America:

“BMW continues to pursue new ways to support the development of a robust public charging infrastructure that will benefit current and future BMW i3 owners across the country. This BMW-Nissan project builds on BMW’s ongoing commitment to participate in joint partnerships designed to expand DC Fast charging options nationwide for all EV drivers. Together with Nissan, we are focused on facilitating longer distance travel so that even more drivers will choose to experience the convenience of e-mobility for themselves.”

Andrew Speaker, Nissan’s director of Electric Vehicle Sales and Marketing:

“Nissan takes a three-pronged approach to growing public EV charging options for LEAF drivers by installing quick chargers in the community, at corporate workplaces and at Nissan dealerships. By working with BMW to increase the number of available public quick-chargers, we are able to further enhance range confidence among EV drivers across the country.”

Dual Port Charger

Dual Port Charger

Full press release below:

BMW AND NISSAN PARTNER TO DEPLOY DUAL FAST CHARGERS ACROSS THE U.S. TO BENEFIT ELECTRIC VEHICLE DRIVERS

BMW and Nissan Partner on DC Fast Charging Network.

A total of 120 dual-port 50kW DC Fast-charging stations have been installed across 19 states to support longer distance electric vehicle travel for Nissan LEAF and BMW i3 drivers.
These publicly available Greenlots-networked charging stations include both CHAdeMO and CCS (Combo) connectors, suitable for all DC Fast charging-capable electric vehicles in the U.S.

WOODCLIFF LAKE, NJ and NASHVILLE, TN – December 21, 2015… BMW and Nissan are joining forces to offer public DC Fast charging at 120 locations across 19 states in an effort to support Nissan LEAF and BMW i3 customers and to promote increased adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) nationwide.

With this partnership between two of the top EV manufacturers, BMW and Nissan address the growing demand for additional public DC Fast-charging options in markets spanning the country, giving drivers the ability to easily extend the length of their electric travels. The breadth of Nissan and BMW’s fast-charger buildout is expansive, with fast chargers now available in California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, Nevada, New York, North and South Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin.

“BMW continues to pursue new ways to support the development of a robust public charging infrastructure that will benefit current and future BMW i3 owners across the country. This BMW-Nissan project builds on BMW’s ongoing commitment to participate in joint partnerships designed to expand DC Fast charging options nationwide for all EV drivers,” said Cliff Fietzek, Manager Connected eMobility, BMW of North America. “Together with Nissan, we are focused on facilitating longer distance travel so that even more drivers will choose to experience the convenience of e-mobility for themselves.”

“Nissan takes a three-pronged approach to growing public EV charging options for LEAF drivers by installing quick chargers in the community, at corporate workplaces and at Nissan dealerships,” said Andrew Speaker, Nissan’s director of Electric Vehicle Sales and Marketing. “By working with BMW to increase the number of available public quick-chargers, we are able to further enhance range confidence among EV drivers across the country.”

Each of these new locations will offer a dual 50 kW DC Fast-charging station with both CHAdeMO and CCS (Combo) connectors, serving owners of both Nissan LEAF and BMW i3 electric cars, as well as all EV drivers in the U.S. whose vehicles are equipped with quick-charge ports. These 50 kW stations can charge EVs from Nissan and BMW up to 80 percent in about 20-30 minutes, as compared to the longer time required to recharge at a Level 2 (240V) charger, currently the most commonly available public charging station.

Drivers can easily locate the chargers with ConnectedDrive in the BMW i3—either using the in-vehicle Navigation or by using the BMW i Remote App—or via the Nissan EZ-Charge smartphone app. Additionally, these chargers are compatible with the Nissan EZ-Charge cards.

Since the launch of Nissan LEAF – the world’s best-selling electric car – Nissan has reinforced its commitment to zero-emission mobility with investments in EV charging infrastructure to serve the needs of LEAF drivers in markets across the U.S. Nissan also recently introduced the new 2016 LEAF, which has available best-in-class range of 107 miles, making it the first affordable EV to get more than 100 miles on a single charge. Nissan LEAF gets 126 MPGe city and 101 MPGe highway on S models, and 124 MPGe city and 101 MPGe highway on SV and SL trim levels. All LEAF models feature an 80kW AC synchronous motor that generates 107 horsepower and 187 lb-ft of torque, providing a highly responsive, fun-to-drive experience.

BMW i is focused on the development of visionary vehicles and mobility services, inspiring design, and a new understanding of premium that is strongly defined by sustainability. The BMW i3, the first all-electric vehicle from the BMW Group and winner of the 2015 Green Car of the Year award, has been the standout in the electric vehicle field since its launch in 2013. With a 170 horsepower synchronous electric motor powered by a 22-kWh lithium-ion battery, the BMW i3 can travel emissions free for 80-100 miles. With a combined rating of 124 MPGe, the BMW i3 is the most efficient EV as rated by the U.S. EPA.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

42 responses to "Nissan & BMW Team Up To Deploy 120 Dual (CHAdeMO & CCS) Fast Chargers In U.S."

  1. David Murray says:

    Arg.. still no new chargers for Texas.

    1. John says:

      I feel your pain…when was the last time you read about Kansas in any news here…

      We’ll eventually catch up…maybe.

      1. Adam says:

        Yeah Oklahoma too..

  2. RexxSee says:

    120 medium power chargers! It takes two giant car makers to build only 120 chargers?!?
    Tiny Tesla has more than 1500 high powers in the USA alone!

    1. Steve says:

      That just goes to show how serious and innovative Tesla is.

      Look at how many battery size options Tesla has given its customers in the past 5 years. What has Nissan or BMW done with batter size options – next to nothing.

      1. RexxSee says:

        I can deduct from their illogical refusal to join the Tesla network that they all want Tesla to die.

        1. RexxSee says:

          If ICE carmakers were serious in the electric transition, they would agree on one standard and install a lot of 120 kW + chargers.
          But maintaining many standards is confusing, a bad seller and counterproductive for the public good.

          1. Nick says:

            Tesla requires would be partners to produce cars capable of accepting 120kW charge rates.

            Neither Nissan or BMW have such vehicles.

            1. Al S says:

              Considering the S60 only accepts up to 105 kW before tapering off, I don’t think Tesla Motors’s standards are quite that strict.

              If a major manufacturer produces a car with a 50 kWh battery that can charge at 100 kW and is willing to make a significant investment to promote the Supercharger and HPWC networks, do you think Tesla Motors would be interested in partnering?

    2. This is just one project BMW is involved. This brings the total number of DCQC stations in the US that BMW has committed to paying for to over 820. (600 in the EVgo DC Fast program, 104 with the ChargePoint Express Charging Corridors and now 120 with Greenlots)

      We’ll have a post up here tomorrow which further discusses BMW’s infrastructure plans.

  3. JakeY says:

    Key detail is if it is installed logicially or if it is dealer chargers. There’s a major difference between the two.

    1. Brian says:

      “Nissan takes a three-pronged approach to growing public EV charging options for LEAF drivers by installing quick chargers in the community, at corporate workplaces and at Nissan dealerships”

      Plus, I’d say that it’s pretty much a given that it won’t be in a dealer lot if it’s a joint effort between two separate automakers.

      I do wonder about the workplace charging. Is that a typo, or is Nissan really installing quick chargers at workplaces? Seems a total waste to do so.

      1. Loboc says:

        “I do wonder about the workplace charging. Is that a typo, or is Nissan really installing quick chargers at workplaces? ”

        I think they are talking about Nissan offices not other offices. Here in Irving, TX there are several Nissan offices with charging facilities.

        1. Brian says:

          Are those chargers QC or L2? Are they for employees or visitors? For function or for show?

          Installing QC for employees to use for their commute just doesn’t make sense. If these are locations with frequent visitors, maybe that’s ok? But still I question the logic here over just building L2 charge points.

        2. Chris C. says:

          Worry not, Nissan isn’t installing DCFC at workplaces. However they are supporting installation of Level 2 stations. Here in Georgia, the deal is that you get a $500 rebate PER PLUG from Nissan if you put in Level 2, as long as it’s a workplace with 50+ employees and you agree to let Nissan come and do a ride-and-drive event. That $500 matches the Georgia Power (local utility) rebate, so $1000 PER PLUG. If you are putting in dual-plug Chargepoint CP 4000 pedestals, that’s $2000 per pedestal. In Georgia, the Nissan program expires 21-Mar-2016, and the utility program continues to end of 2016.

          1. Dave K. says:

            I can verify that Nissan DOES install QCs in workplace, if you have enough cars (~200) and a committed employer it does make sense.

        3. martinwinlow says:

          Ah, well. Who knows? I have often tried to get InsideEVs to adopt a ‘standard’ nomenclature for the various rates/types of EV charging and ideally one which much of the rest of the EV scene already uses but to no avail. So, not only do we have non-standard standards, we have non-standard names for non-standard standards. Is this a conspiracy? No. It’s just stupidity.

          Can’t we just have ‘slow’ (from a household socket up to 3kW), ‘fast’ (dedicated AC supply, 3 to ~25kW) and ‘rapid’ (DC 25kW+)? MW

  4. John says:

    120 is a drop in the bucket, numerically, financially and in every other way. Even if they place all of them strategically on major highways (and my guess is that they won’t), it’s not enough. Say the installed cost is $50,000 each. That’s still only a total of $6 million invested. Truly a drop in the bucket for even one auto maker, and even less for two. Count me unimpressed.

    1. Totally not enough of an investment. At $50,000 per deployment for 120 locations, it amounts to ~$50 per i3/LEAF sold!
      (Nissan LEAF’s: 100,000 & BMW i3: ~20,000 vehicles in US)

      If investment was just ~$500 per BEV sold, number of Combo DC charge in US would be on par with the UK at ~1200. (much … much less than that deployed in Japan)

      Not complaining … just stating that BMW & Nissan need to declare an amount they are investing per BEV sold so as to set expects forfuture purchase decisions!

      FYI: Having 1 million BEV owners fight over just 1000 en-route extended range infrastructure points (in 2018/19) is not the best way to support the fastest growing vehicle market. ^\o.o/^

  5. So, if each one is installed as a stand alone at each site, and the installed cost is $100,000 per site, then 120 of them equals $12 Million.

    But if they put 2 per site for $150,000 each site and 60 sites, for a total of just $9 Million, saving tgem 3 Million.

    And since they are sharing this, if equal, woukd be just $6 Million to $4.5 Million each.

    There is no mention of freeway installs, from what I see here! So this is more a marketing exercise, than a real infrastructure build out!

    1. Brian says:

      “this is more a marketing exercise, than a real infrastructure build out”

      That seems to be the case for any QC infrastructure announcement not coming from Tesla. Sad that we’re still in this boat 5 years into having modern EVs on the road.

  6. Garrity says:

    Agreed DCFC charging at work place mostly a waste of resources. A bunch of 120 plugs would be more useful and cheaper,

    Still waiting for all the Bmw charge point , nrg and now green lots chargers to show up. Hopefully, they will actually put them along freeways Between cities and not in shopping malls

  7. I thought that BMW and VW were going to build ~1,000 CCS chargers? I wonder what is going on with that?

    Massachusetts is supposed to be building QC units at each of the service areas on the Mass Pike. I certainly hope those are combination CHAdeMO and CCS units.

    1. Brian says:

      Is MA talking about that? I hope they do. NYS has been talking about putting chargers on the Thruway. Together, that would allow me to drive any EV on the market (even today’s 80-mile BEVs, as tedious as that would be) from Syracuse straight to Boston. That would awesome!

    2. Elroy says:

      Maybe VW ran out of infrastructure investment income.

  8. Did they release a map of the intended locations for these chargers, or just 120 chargers “somewhere” in the 19 states? I really hope they focus on interstate rest stops and other exits that will facilitate longer distance travel in first gen EVs.

  9. Chris says:

    Can 2 cars charge at 50kw each or 50kw shared or 50kw one car at a time?

    1. Mike I says:

      One car at a time and the peak is not even 50kW. It’s probably 40-44kW peak and a Leaf will slow down after about 5 minutes. I don’t know what the charging curve looks like on an i3. I can get to 80% SOC at full power on my e-Golf. The e-Golf has a relatively low battery voltage so it only takes 36-38kW from these “50kW” fast chargers.

      http://www.myvwegolf.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=444

      1. Al S says:

        The 2016 LEAF takes 47 kW up to a least 80% of its capacity. The same is true for the Spark and Soul EVs.

        1. mustang_sallad says:

          Not if the battery is cold – ramp down happens much earlier if it’s cold, but yes, in normal conditions, you can definitely get a lot more than just 5 minutes at 40+ kW

  10. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

    So, what’s the number to call if a station isn’t working and will someone come to fix the station immediately? If they can’t fix it, will they flatbed your car to the next station?

    1. kubel says:

      Both BMW and Nissan independently offer free roadside assistance in the event of a dead battery.

  11. Pete Bauer says:

    This is a good joint effort. Since both the companies are not in Top-5, its better to pool their resources and put up Joint charging network.

    This way they can also advertise their products like Leaf, i3, i8 and so on.

  12. Ocean Railroader says:

    This is cool that Greenlots is going to get funding for 120 new quick charger locations. This makes me wounder will they use the list of location ideas I sent them for a cross county Route ideas along Interstates 70 and 40 along with and US Route 60 and US Route 66 and US Route 30.

  13. HVACman says:

    It will be interesting to see if GM partners up soon with this group or other mfgrs to further expand CCS FCDC charging infrastructure in anticipation of the Bolt’s market release.

  14. wavelet says:

    A lot of negative reactions in the comments here… Wasn’t expecting that.
    I think it’s still a positive development, in the sense of a cooperation between competing EV carmakers.
    Isn’t this the first such example, at least in the US?
    Re:
    1) Too few charging stations. Y’all realize that if the project is considered successful (positive PR and helps sell EVs), they’ll add more stations?

    2) Ditto re charging capacity. Once there are enough large-battery EVs on the roads, nothing’s stopping them from adding higher capacity new chargers or retrofitting existing ones.

    3) Once the principle has been established, it’ll be much more likely additional EV vendors will join the partnership (except Tesla); since the chargers are dual-standard, they are a good match both for CHAdeMO vendors (Kia, Hyundai, eventually other Japanese) as well as CCS ones (VW Group, Mercedes, Ford, GM).

    1. TP says:

      I agree, too many are complaining when they should be saying “thank you.”

      Reality Check: there aren’t enough EV’s on the roads to make a viable EV charging company. Nissan and BMW are trying to prop up multiple players, and hope that some can survive long enough for when the EV market is much bigger and healthier.

      If you all want to complain about something, consider asking why we almost never hear of GM, Ford, Chrysler/Fiat, and VW taking a lead role in getting EVSE infrastructure out?

      1. Elroy says:

        Exactly! GM especially. Instead of investing all the TV ad money for their own products, help out with at least dealership fast chargers.

        1. Dave K. says:

          Until the Bolt rolls out in large numbers GM’s main product is a PHEV, so they have no motivation to support DCQC infrastructure for a few cars sold only in CARB states. I’m guessing that will change is a couple of years.

  15. Brandon says:

    Here is something relevant that I have recently written up:

    Reliable Fast Charge Networks

    I see a weakness in some of today’s fast charge networks that I’m hoping operators will address in future planning and rolling out of fast charge stations.
    A network of fast chargers needs to be completely reliable if it is to be trusted by EV drivers now and in the future.
    This is particularly important for those charge stations that enable longer distance EV travel between cities.
    In the same way that a gas car driver visits a gas station with his gauge on E and is quite certain that he will be able to fill up, so an EV driver needs to be certain that a fast charge location will provide the charge he most certainly needs.
    Future EV drivers who travel on a main route that has a well spaced network of fast chargers may not have range anxiety, but if there exists a good possibility of encountering a fast charger being out of service, then we have charger anxiety.
    Some early adopters of electric vehicles may be willing to put up with this, but most mainstream drivers will not.
    So what are some things that could be done to help a network be reliable?
    Here are some thoughts I have:
    For the long distance main route fast charger locations between cities, I would recommend two chargers, one obviously being the 50 kW fast charger and the other a Level 2 j1772 charger at the very least. More than one charger per location is necessary for EV driver confidence. An EV driver is not going to be too keen to take a trip that requires him to rely on just one fast charger per location that has the potential to be out of order in some way.
    Having a Level 2 as a backup charger is a cheap way to accomplish this to a degree.
    Better yet would be to have another fast charger installed, as soon as possible considering the volume of usage the location gets. This could be a 25 kW charger to save on costs. A location would then have 2 fast chargers and one Level 2.
    This would help to eliminate the possibility of an individual or family being stranded on a trip if a fast charger has an issue or is temporarily out of service.
    I know for myself that I wouldn’t trust making that trip if there is just one charger that I and my family are depending upon.

    1. TP says:

      Agreed. In my opinion, the current “networks” should change their business model from selling equipment and network access to hosts, and instead become EVSE owner/operators.

      In my opinion, the lack of reliability is going to put some of these companies, such as Car Charging (Blink), out of business.

  16. SJC says:

    About time, car makers should have teamed up years ago.