Newsflash: California Approves Additional $1 Million In Funds For Install Of Fast Chargers

3 years ago by Eric Loveday 13

California Energy Commission Logo

California Energy Commission Logo

NRG eVgo Unveils CHAdeMO/CCS Fast Charger At Raley's Supermarket In Northern California

NRG eVgo Unveils CHAdeMO/CCS Fast Charger At Raley’s Supermarket In Northern California

“California Approves $12 Million for Energy Efficiency and Alternative Fuel Programs”

Reads the headline, but since we’re only interested in the spending specific to electric vehicles, here are those details:

  • Sacramento Area Council of Governments: Received nearly $500,000 to install electric vehicle fast chargers in three grocery store parking lots. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District will own, operate and maintain the charging stations.
  • South Coast Air Quality Management District: Received approval of an amendment providing $420,000 to an existing $300,000 grant the district received in 2013 to install electric vehicle direct current fast charging stations. The additional funds will be used to install more versatile stations that can charge a wider variety of electric vehicles.

Full press release below:

SACRAMENTO – The California Energy Commission approved more than $6.7 million in no-interest loans for the Tulare City School District, Kern Community College District, and Yuba Community College District to install energy-efficient upgrades at their facilities.

During its monthly business meeting, the five-member Commission also approved more than $5.1 million in grants to Community Fuels, the Sacramento Area Council of Governments, and the South Coast Air Quality Management District to support their alternative fuels programs.

Loans
Loans were provided through the Energy Conservation Assistance Act-Education (ECAA-Ed) program, which provides no-interest loans to community colleges and K-12 schools. The loans are funded by the California Clean Energy Jobs Act (Proposition 39). Funds must be used for energy projects and are paid back within 20 years of the loan date using energy cost savings.

Tulare City School District: Received a $3 million loan to install solar panels at its eight schools. The loan will be paid back in about 18 years and will save about $160,000 annually in utility costs.
Kern Community College District: Received a $3 million loan to install solar panels in its Porterville College parking lot. The loan will be paid back in about 19 years and will save about $150,000 annually in utility costs.
Yuba Community College District: Received $710,000 loan to install energy management systems for a well pump. The loan will be paid back in about nine years and will save about $75,000 annually in energy costs.

Grants
Grants were provided through the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program (ARFVTP), which supports the development and use of alternative and renewable fuel projects and advanced transportation technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on petroleum-based fuels.

Community Fuels: Received more than $4 million to increase the efficiency and production rate at its biodiesel facility in Stockton. The plant converts waste grease, agricultural waste, and other low-grade feedstock into biodiesel fuel.
Sacramento Area Council of Governments: Received nearly $500,000 to install electric vehicle fast chargers in three grocery store parking lots. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District will own, operate and maintain the charging stations.
South Coast Air Quality Management District: Received approval of an amendment providing $420,000 to an existing $300,000 grant the district received in 2013 to install electric vehicle direct current fast charging stations. The additional funds will be used to install more versatile stations that can charge a wider variety of electric vehicles.

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13 responses to "Newsflash: California Approves Additional $1 Million In Funds For Install Of Fast Chargers"

  1. scottf200 says:

    Presumably combo CHAdeMO/CCS Fast Chargers?

    1. Spec9 says:

      I would assume so. They required such chargers in their settlement with NRG.

  2. Tech01x says:

    Insane waste of government money. They need to spend time looking at BEV infrastructure over 10-20 years, not 1-2 years. That’s L2 charging at places where people park for a long time or where it is hard to make money on it – parks for instance.

    $500,000 for 3 grocery store parking lots? Complete insanity.

    1. Nick says:

      Doesn’t seem too bad.

      The traffic control lighting at an intersection costs 500k.

      That won’t even charge your car. 🙂

      1. sven says:

        Charging at an intersection sounds like a bad idea. 😀

    2. Ocean Railroader says:

      What’s strange is that I remember the fast charging electric car charging company EVgo3 saying that they where going to spend $50,000 on each new duel standard charging station.

      Personally I think spending $120,000 on a charging station that is only going to charge one to two cars at a time is a major rip off. In that the costs for these stations should be a lot less based off of them not being that electrically complex or that big.

      Honestly I would love to put charging stations at the bases of power poles in the city along city streets to avoid wiring stuff underground or across parking lots.

  3. scott franco says:

    So California continues to dump chargers in the large cities while I-5 routes north of LA have nothing. Sac already has 2-3 FCers.

    1. Ocean Railroader says:

      What’s really starting to bug me lately is that they keep putting more and more DC fast chargers in the same 50 mile across area in California where in theory you could be less then 20 miles from your house. They are also doing this in Washington where the same three mile across gets more and more chargers. But over all the territory that you could drive in a electric car remains the same like driving in a giant fish tank in that you can’t go any farther once you hit the glass wall of range of it.

      Personally I think that we should let electric car charging companies build new chargers to make existing fast chargers more dense in areas. We should instead use public funds to build chargers in new areas like between cities or in far other suburbs to expand the range of electric cars.

      1. Tech01x says:

        This is what I’m saying. These DCFC stations using government money are complete wastes of money when the next generation of BEVs that are not Tesla’s arrive in the showrooms. In 2017-2019, the “normal” range of a low end BEV is likely 120-150 miles. We hopefully will have access to many more BEvs with 200+ miles of range. Further, we will have many more BEVs and therefore destination charging 5-10 or 10-20 is far more important than charging 1-2 quickly.

        Charging at a grocery store does not make sense with the next generation of BEVs. The next generation hopefully not going to require charging outside the home on normal driving for most people. Therefore, where charging should go is very different than today’s Leaf or MIEV. The demand for charging is going to increase, but not where these stations are going to be constructed.

        It would be better to offer incentives for workplace charging, especially with solar. Parks/recreation/malls are the next logical places.

  4. Phr3d says:

    Dear (fill in blank of major retailer) Starbucks,
    Please consider installing charging stations where they are Needed, complete with advertising on the hardware and ads on the control screen.

    Sincerely,
    everyone

  5. Ash09 says:

    So do these charging stations only charge 1 or 2 cars at a time? Would it make more sense in the long run to install a strip of them, so that say 20 parking section of cars all have chargers on them?

    And if you put them on the other side as well, you can easily double that amount.

    I’d imagine it would be costly to build something like this. But if you scale it up enough, that might bring the cost down too, since you’d be installing thousands of these all over the place, rather than one or two at a time.

  6. Bill Howland says:

    You would think they’d also buy some battery modules to trim the demand charges that these things are sure to accrue.