New Nissan Leaf Coming In September, On Sale In 2017

1 month ago by Sebastian Blanco 144

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

nissan ids concept

Nissan IDS Concept

We’ve got a date. Sort of.

Tim Gallagher, the senior manager of Leaf and Electric Vehicles for Nissan, has confirmed to IEVs that the long-awaited all-new Leaf be revealed globally in September and finally go on sale later this year. We don’t have any details about the new EV just yet, but there has been a lot of speculation and putting two and two together to try and figure out what’s coming.

For example, we know it will have some sort of autonomous driving ability, specifically that it will be able to drive itself in a single lane on motorways. We can get some sort of feel for what the new Leaf will look like by imagining a production version of the IDS concept that was revealed at the Tokyo Motor Show in late 2015. Also, last summer, Nissan basically confirmed that the new Leaf will have a range of over 200 miles. By putting those things together, we can at least get a feel for the new Leaf, but we’ll have to wait until the fall to see for sure.

So, what do you do if you’re a Nissan fan and have a first-gen Leaf that’s about to run out of its lease? Well, Nissan has a proposal for you, too. “Select” Leaf customers will be getting an offer to extend their leases if they expire in 2017 and haven’t made other arrangements, to “potentially receive three months of waived payments on their extended leases, and be placed on a priority list for the all-new Leaf,” Gallagher told IEVs. ” We know we have plenty of loyal and passion customers and we want to keep them in the family. This gives them some options. We are pretty confident that the next generation Leaf – all together, range, technology, design and value – will exceed their expectations.  More details will be available in coming months, but for now – for those eligible – it is a way to stay in their car, get three months waived, and get on the priority list.”

Update:  Nissan has now made it official on its Twitter channel.  Update 2:  Nissan has since closed this Twitter channel for unknown reasons

Source: Nissan

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145 responses to "New Nissan Leaf Coming In September, On Sale In 2017"

  1. Mad says:

    Finally a date!

    1. ijonjack says:

      I hope this one has some Range with Optional Range choices…

      1. Jim Whitehead says:

        I hope they turned over a New Leaf. (pun intended) Did they use Tesla-like liquid cooled batteries? If they didn’t the range may drop in half in Arizona, like it did in earlier models.

        1. Knut Erik Ballestad says:

          That problem was solved already in the 2014 model Leaf’s…

    2. Carlos Ghosn says:

      Actually, NOT a real date.

      1. Mister G says:

        HOW MUCH?

      2. William says:

        True, it is not a date. But, possibly a “September to Remember” for the Leaf Lovers among us, that want a worthy Leaf 2.0 200+mi. Range and Design redo to rival the new kGM Bolt competitor

      3. Not Carlos Ghosn says:

        Hi Carlos!!! 🙂

  2. Anon says:

    But it won’t look as nice as the IDS Concept– just a bit less Fugly than the current design. 🙁

    1. CLIVE says:

      IF you say so.

      It will be awesome !!

      1. Jeffrey Songster says:

        I always love having other folks give us their OPINIONS as if they were fact. Why bother… Seems such a waste. I like my LEAFs… A white one and a blue one… Cant wait to see the new one and check the tech… Gonna be fun! So… Opiners… How about a useful statement about the cars or why bother. Not everyone loved VW beetles originally… But they sure sold a ton of them and saved tanker loads of fuel.

          1. Erik says:

            I honestly think this is just a test mule, clearly comprised of the current Leaf’s midsection with a new front and rear end. probably not the final design i.m.h.o.

            1. Anon says:

              I would guess you’re right about everything you said, except that– this -IS- , for better or worse, the final design.

              Enjoy.

        1. Dave M says:

          We have 2 Leafs also. A 2013 and a new 2017. I generally like the car(s). Range on the new one is significantly improved, so I’m pretty happy. And the deals a couple weeks ago were AMAZING! The car(s) work great for us and yeah, 2013 range is a little disappointing, but pack is at close to 50k miles on the 2013 with only 1 bar lost so far. I still get some pretty good range on it considering. The 2017, OMG…GOM showing 139 miles on a full charge! And then I drove it 22 miles and most of that on the freeway on a round trip and it lost exactly 22 miles on the GOM! I know the GOM isn’t scientific or anythng, but comparing my 2 cars, it is a nice improvement. Curious what the resale value will be of my current Leafs when they stop selling the current model and all you can buy is a new model for a lot more money! Might even go up in value somewhat!

          1. Sammy Stome says:

            The older LEAFs will plummet in price as more are traded in for the new 2018 longer range version

  3. KenZ says:

    Frickin’ September, just for the reveal???? Killing me.

    No, wait… killing themselves.

    1. Alonso Perez says:

      Probably the time between the reveal and availability will be very short, since the reveal will kill existing Leaf sales.

      1. John Ray says:

        Nissan has a history of revealing a car and putting it on sale immediately – see the Renault Zoe ZE 40 for reference. I don’t think you can underestimate how highly anticipated this car is. For all the Tesla hype, the new Leaf may well be the more important car.

        1. leafowner says:

          Don’t agree — the Model 3 is way more important.

          1. Joe says:

            WE don’t Leaf 2.0 pricing yet.
            If it’s supposed to be 20% cheaper than current model, it could find its way on the market without being a competitor to the model 3

        2. Bret says:

          New LEAF more important that the Model 3?

          Bwahahaha!!! 🙂

          I drive a Leaf and know that’s a joke.

          Honestly, I hope the new Leaf is a big success, but I plan on getting a Model 3 when my Leaf lease is up. There is plenty of room for the Bolt, Leaf 2 and Model 3 in the market. But, the Model 3 is car that will largely predict the future pace of global EV sales. Nissan forfeited their place as the EV market leader years ago.

          1. John Ray says:

            Glad to hear that you have it all figured out despite the the fact that neither car has driven the first mile in production form.

            How about this: I predict that the new Leaf will easily outsell the Model Three in 2018.

            1. evnow says:

              As someone driving a Leaf for 6+ years … and with 10k+ posts in MNL … I’m willing to take a bet on this.

              ps : US sales

              1. Karen says:

                Hello, so glad you have a lot of experience, I hope that you might have an answer for me. I have a 2011 Leaf with 25k miles and the most I can get on a charge now is 54 range. Actual driving about 40-48.
                Do you think the new 200mi range battery will be available to install in an older Leaf?
                God, I hope so I am so close to not being able to drive to/from work.

                1. Mister G says:

                  Karen,bite the bullet and garage your 11 Leaf it might be worth something in 20 years to a collector of early EVs. In September 2012,I leased 12 Leaf for 39 months returned it and now lease 2016 Leaf for 36 months, these cars are not engineered for long term use, maybe in a few years battery technology will be for long-term use. Today it is better to lease and return.

                  1. Samwise says:

                    I actually don’t think the battery technology is the problem, just the small capacity.
                    The bigger the battery the less cycles it does, the less range it loses, and less it matters when it does.
                    If your LEAF had started with twice the battery capacity it would have done half the number of cycles and lost half the amount of range all while starting with twice as much in the first place.

            2. M says:

              Glad you have it all figured out … Even though pricing is not yet published 😁

            3. Bret says:

              It’s easy to predict the Model 3 will far outsell the Leaf 2 John Ray.

              Tesla already has close to 400K paid reservations just waiting for the Model 3 to arrive. Meanwhile, Nissan is barely selling 1K Leafs per month. The Leaf 2 doesn’t seem to offer any ground-breaking new technology that would allow it to overtake the momentum of the Model 3, nor will the performance and styling be anywhere even close.

              Did I mention, dual-motors, multiple battery sizes, auto-pilot, ludicrous mode and the super-charger network? Nissan had better bring their A-game if they want to compete with Tesla.

              1. Boyelectric says:

                Sure… those wonderful options only double the price

              2. 100LL says:

                To outsell a competitor, the car must be available. In that way, Leaf 2.0 could be available at a larger number than model 3. High-five to the “winner”.

              3. Erik says:

                I don’t give a rat’s ass about dual motors, ludicrous “boys toys” mode and $10k extra for auto-pilot & advanced auto-pilot. A far denser fast charging network for ALL EV’s than the supercharger networlk exists in the Netherlands. (http://www.fastned.nl)

                So these things wouldn’t tip the scales for me.

              4. John Ray says:

                You are naive if you think those “close to 400k paid reservations” will translate into anywhere near 400k sales. The study that just came out that indicates most Model 3 reservation holders are Toyota drivers making $50-100k/year only reinforces that. When the rubber meets the road, and they see the final price, most of these folks will probably bail if they haven’t already.

                Nissan has two paths to victory. One is to produce a better car at a lower price which I predict they will. The second is to produce the car in the needed volume and with the needed availability which I also predict they will do.

                Leaf 1.0 was a great car that had battery issues for the first two model years. Beyond that, it’s hard to find fault. If Nissan does what I think they will do, they will produce a top notch, affordable world car. Neither GM or Tesla will be able to touch it.

                Mind you, Tesla has a chance. But the headwinds are far stronger than anything Nissan is facing.

                1. arne-nl says:

                  That’s the exact same thing they said about the 20k or so Model S reservations that Tesla held before launch. Now see how that story ended.

                2. Sammy Stome says:

                  Yeah !!! The $35K is $50K out the door with options, taxes,etc.

            4. Drucifera says:

              Zero chance. Tesla has sucked all the air out of the room with their 400k of reservations. Unless there are a whole ton of people that bail on that PLUS a whole ton of converts PLUS Nissan/Renault can come up with a lot more productive capacity for batteries, this just can’t happen

              1. Rik says:

                There’s plentiy of room in the car market for Tesla Model 3, Nissan Leaf 2 and Chevy Bolt.

                For the most part, these BEVs all compete with ICE.

                As Musk said, Tesla can’t build all of the EVs for the sustainable transport revolution.

                I hope that all of these 3 cars are hugely successful in accelerating the transition of global vehicle transport to BEVs.
                It can’t come tto soon for the planet.

        3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          Not to be unkind, but if Nissan really thinks the Leaf 2.0 will be a “more important” car than the Tesla Model 3 (or the Bolt EV, either), then they wouldn’t be essentially begging current Leaf owners not to buy or reserve a Bolt EV or a Model 3 by — if I read this right — giving them three months’ worth of lease for free.

          Looks very much like a sign of desperation to me.

          And if the Leaf 2.0, like the earlier versions, doesn’t have a liquid cooled battery pack, then it’s going to be perceived as increasingly obsolete as public EV chargers are given higher and higher power; power levels the Leaf 2.0 won’t be able to use because the battery would overheat with rapid charging.

          1. Foob says:

            Could be desperation. I’ll be interested to see if they offer the same deal in the UK (which has neither the Bolt nor the 3 in the same timescale), that would be an indication the other way.

          2. Brian says:

            Not really begging. Lol. Just giving great deals to loyal customers. Plus the dealers will negotiate on pricing.

          3. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

            Dude, are you serious? They know leaseholders have a decision to make and it won’t be to buy out their Leaf. These are already BEV drivers who’ve been Nissan customers and if they don’t do something they’ll lose them to a competitor just because their lease is ending a few months too early. Better to keep them in what is already a heavily depreciated car.

            Plus, this is fantastic. By the end of the year we should have 3 long-range BEVs (possible the Leaf won’t be of course), eachwith different characteristics and price points.

        4. Jeffrey Songster says:

          Definitely will be more versatile since likely a hot hatchback like the original. Mine have hauled 5 folks plenty of times… Large objects and people with the seats folded… Send are nicer looking usually… But even Model S is hatchback. Why Tesla didn’t make 3 one is beyond me.

          1. ricegf says:

            Yes, from 5 adults to 3 adults+2 car seats, the Leaf is very much a 5 person car. Here’s hoping they have another winner up their sleeves – more competition means we all win.

  4. David Murray says:

    I’m really surprised the reveal isn’t sooner. I mean, in theory there could be Tesla Model-3s already in customer hands by that point. I suspect there was some delay. For example they made some last minute change that delayed the car by a year or more. Well, I hope it is worth the wait.

    1. jhm614 says:

      I think the delay is due to CARB credit drop for MY2018 cars.

      1. bro1999 says:

        That makes no sense. CARB credits for a 200+ mile BEV goes from 4 in 2017 down to to 3 in 2018. There is 0 incentive for Nissan to delay the launch of Leaf 2.0 so it can debut as a 2018 model. They could have released it as a 2017 model and collected 4 ZEV credits per sale in CARB states.

        My WAG is that the Bolt’s 238 EPA range forced Nissan to offer a Leaf 2.0 that had at least that much range in the form of a higher-optioned version with a bigger battery. They may have been content releasing a ~160 mile Leaf 2.0 with a future option for 200+ miles, but the Bolt forced Nissan to offer a 200+ mile option out of the gate.

        1. Josh Bryant says:

          I agree with both you and Brian.

          I firmly believe the reveal was supposed to be CES/NAIAS in January.

          The only thing that could have surprised Nissan in late 2016 was Bolt far exceeding the 200 mile mark on EPA.

        2. realistic says:

          How badly does Nissan need to collect more ZEV Credits? Their balance remains pretty high amongst a foedl of players who are all generating more through the flood of new Plug-Ins, excepting Mazda perhaps. The cash value of credits is falling faster than the requirements are tightening, and in Nissan’s case their fleet mileage is also growing. Not sure it’s really that big of a deal.

          1. bro1999 says:

            CARB credits will be harder to earn in 2018, especially for manufacturers pushing fool cells. Fool cells go from a max of 9 CARB credits in 2017 to a max of 4 in 2018. Vehicles like the Bolt/Model S go from 4 credits in 2017 to 3 in 2018.

            CARB credits only get more valuable in 2018 and beyond, not less.

        3. jhm614 says:

          But Nissan doesn’t have a 200 mi EV, they have a 107 mi EV that currently gets — 3 CARB credits per sale. So you ride it all the way out, keep working on the 200 mi battery and launch at EOY with the 150 mile and the 200 mile option. Pricing will be interesting, though. The Iconic (sp?) has nailed down 125 mi at 29k and Chevy has nailed down 240 @ 37.5k, so the Leaf options will need to slot in between – 31k and 35k?

    2. realistic says:

      “I mean, in theory there could be Tesla Model-3s already in customer hands by that point.”

      The phrase “in theory” is very, very meaningful in this statement.

    3. Someone out there says:

      Yes, that’s what I think. They saw the Bolt EV concept and realized they have to aim higher to stay competitive and all these delays are because they redesigned the LEAF to take a bigger battery.

  5. Kris says:

    2017 is worldwide for Leaf, Model 3 with low options, that the car is at Leaf pricelevel, will not reach customers outside US even in 2018, more likely 2019.

    1. John Ray says:

      You are correct, sir. Thus, the Leaf is a more important car than the Bolt or the Model 3.

  6. Another (Euro) industrial point of view says:

    Great news ! Thanks IEVs !!

  7. DNAinaGoodWay says:

    Still a lot of questions but interesting. My Leaf lease expires mid August and I was hoping it’d be here by then, but if it’s good enough I might wait.

    1. mx says:

      But, a really CLASSY leaf extension offer. That’s really something special.

      1. CLIVE says:

        2 months off for a 1 year extension is a great deal IMO.

        1. CLIVE says:

          3 months 😉

        2. unlucky says:

          It’s a terrible deal.

          The cars have very little resale value. They’re worth less than half of their initial price.

          Paying 83% as much (10 months for 12) or 75% (9 of 12) of the amount you paid to lease a new LEAF to lease a 3 year old LEAF is a ripoff.

          1. CLIVE says:

            Oh it is better to have no car?

            It is just a monthly payment a stopgap until the next choice arrives.

            1. unlucky says:

              Moving the goalposts now?

              Better than having no car still doesn’t make it a good deal.

              1. CLIVE says:

                When I am basically renting a car in a newer segment, why care so much like you do.

  8. SparkEV says:

    All I’m hoping for is they don’t give out free charging with these new 200+ miles range Leaf. If they did, some Leaf could take upwards of 2 hours at the charger. Yes, it supposed to be 30 minutes free, but I have seen some who plug in for second 30 minute “free” with 24 kWh Leaf. Based on that, some will undoubtedly plug in for 5th or 6th “free” 30 minutes to try to get to 100%.

    1. CLIVE says:

      There is a 30 minute cap on Nissan paying for charging…

      Now maybe you can stop complaining about the same thing.

      1. DJ says:

        Over and over and over and over and over…

        Seriously though enough with the cars that can drive themselves. Sure make it an option if you want it I suppose but I don’t see the point in having to pay for something I wouldn’t use, at least not until it’s actually ready for prime time.

        This whole “let my car autonomously drive itself while I keep my hands 1 nano meter away from the wheel and pay full attention to the road incase I have to take control” offering that is currently available is dumb IMO. When I can get in, punch in an address and take a nap is when I’ll likely opt for it 😀

        1. CLIVE says:

          I still want the Facebook freak to have the car drive for them.

      2. SparkEV says:

        Maybe you should get with the program. You should read my comment before spouting nonsense.

        It’s not “30 minutes free” as in only 30 minutes the entire time you own the car, but 30 minutes at a time for free as many times as you want. There’s nothing preventing you from 30 minutes, disconnect then reconnect for second 30 minutes (or fifth or sixth with bigger battery). You can do that indefinitely.

        Why? Because if you’re on a longer trip, you will need to charge multiple times a day. That necessity (long trip) is a loophole for the local cheapskates to hog the charger.

        1. CLIVE says:

          Maybe you should move, instead of hanging out at chargers hating on the fact you have to pay for juice.

          You complain all the time about it.

          Nothing new from you.

          1. AlphaEdge says:

            I don’t know, but it seems like a valid complaint.

            It’s a stupid program that encourages cheap people not to charge at home, and inconveniences a lot of people.

            1. Jeffrey Songster says:

              If you charge a LEAF for 30 min it will be above 80% so… There is almost no point to going for more than another 10 to 15 minutes… Especially since the rate slows so much… Hit it for 30 mins… Then go to next one… As for all the substandard remarks about LEAF… It is far more versatile than the tiny, spunky, spark. 5 plus cargo in LEAF. Same range as spark… Relax… Get more folks to drive electric and quit picking on other valid choices.

              1. SparkEV says:

                Leaf needs to be picked on. Nissan did practically nothing for almost 7 years, and giving out free charging with crappy charge taper only made it worse for other EV. I wonder how many people just walked away from EV after encountering so much needless waiting thanks to Leaf and slow charging.

                As for SparkEV, sure, it’s smaller than Leaf, but it’s leaps and bounds better. You don’t sit at DCFC and have other people wait while it’s charging at 2 kW out of 50 kW charger. I don’t blame Leaf drivers; blame rest squarely on the idiots at Nissan for giving out free charging knowing the awful charge taper and failed to put TMS on Leaf battery making it even worse in warm weather.

          2. SparkEV says:

            @Clive,

            Believe me, I thought about chucking it (EV) several times. Then I looked at the alternatives to SparkEV, and I have to bear with Nissan’s idiocy. Had it been a lesser EV (like Leaf), I would’ve chucked EV long ago and complain how EVs are slow excuse of a car that can’t go anywhere due to excessive waiting thanks to local free chargers enabled by a company trying to sell sub-par product.

            I complain about it all the time, because it happens all the time. As I mentioned in the past, mentioned often, will mention again to discourage others from adopting free charging:

            Free charging SUCKS!

        2. unlucky says:

          I’ve seen plenty of Nissan drivers do exactly what you said.

          As you say, the program is a detriment. It actively discourages me from counting on DCFCs and that cuts their paying business.

    2. bro1999 says:

      And even though the Leaf uses a CHAdeMO plug, any dual-headed station with a CCS plug as well can’t be used if the CHAdeMO side is being used. Only one can be used at a time. =/

    3. Stimpacker says:

      It is a valid complain.

      The CHAdeMO L3 stations in my area mostly have 2 bays. They just installed one that has 4 bays.

      I usually avoid any driving that requires a L3 stop at any 2-bay station. They’re usually hogged by Leafs (and a few i3) due to the free charge cards.

      One time I tried the new 4-bay station, thinking it can’t be all full. WRONG. At 5pm, boom – a bunch of Leafs all showed up. I’m guessing they’re the cheapskates taking advantage of free charging.

      Sparky is right – any more freebies will outright jam these stations. I actually use a gas ICE for going from Bay Area to LA. The Tesla Supercharging experience with that corridor is just too painful.

  9. jhm614 says:

    Thanks for getting us for solid info. It isn’t as soon as I wanted but still great news!! Now just make it look good and give us a battery option or two!

  10. ijonjack says:

    If that’s gonna be the Case….FORGET IT !!!

  11. Another (Euro) industrial point of view says:

    2nd attempt..

    I just hope that the recent pictures we saw of a camouflaged Leaf were not the new Leaf
    but merely a old fugly leaf with a long nose able to contain the self driving equipment under test.
    Otherwise it may be yet another item to the list of “please don’t buy me EV’s”.

  12. Brian says:

    I’m disappointed to hear September. At the same time, I’m happy to have a date. No more of this “maybe at the next auto show” nonsense.

    I leased a Leaf in 2012. In 2015, they offered me $5k off the residual, so I purchased. I am very happy to sit in my current Leaf until this one comes around.

    I wonder when Tesla will be rolling out Model 3s to their stores. Is it possible that one could go test-drive a Model 3, Leaf 2.0, and Bolt all by the end of 2017? That would be incredible!

    1. Mister G says:

      How many bars on your 12 leaf?

      1. Brian says:

        11 showing, with ~40k miles on the clock. I don’t have LeafSpy, but I estimate about 80% of original capacity after 5 years. Which, interestingly enough, is what Nissan told me in 2012.

        1. Mister G says:

          Wow that’s good, my 12 leased Leaf lost 1 bar every 10k miles, at the end of lease it had 36k miles and lost 3 bars. My 16 leaf lost one bar at 12k miles so far.

          1. Brian says:

            Yeah. The biggest killer is heat, whether its from ambient heat, charging, or driving.

            I live in a cold climate. Even in the summer, if I let the battery cool off, it is usually down to 5 temp bars in the morning. So I try not to charge if it shows 6 bars or more. Only about 3 times in 5 years have I seen 7 temp bars. I think they were all after charging when the car already had 6.

            I also charge to 80% almost exclusively. I occasionally charge to 100% to balance the pack, but never let it sit at 100% for more than an hour.

            1. douglas white says:

              Hi. New leaf owner (2013 SL) how do i set the charger to only 80%?

              1. Brian says:

                You have to use the charge timer. I believe it’s the same as on the 2012. For my car, I set a charge timer from 12:10am to 12:00am (meaning it technically doesn’t charge for 10 minutes/day). Then I set the charge limit to 80% for that timer.

                Hope this helps!

        2. Djoni says:

          I do have LeafSpy and it’s showing 83% SOH for a MY2012 with 80 600 miles done.
          Do I need to say that I’m quite happy with that car.

          1. douglas white says:

            How do i get Leafspy?

    2. Josh Bryant says:

      I doubt 3 will be in inventory for test drives by year end, but Tesla did do test drive tours for reservation holders for S and X.

      As far as LEAF goes, not likely to get test drives in 2017 except maybe CA. On sale rarely means stocked in lots. More like early reservation holders starting to get cars.

      1. Brian says:

        You’re probably right. Maybe spring/summer of 2018 Tesla will do a test-drive tour like they did with the S. I caught them when they were in Syracuse, and test drove an S70. They guy encouraged me to floor it down Erie Boulevard. Boy did it move, and that was the lowest performing option at the time!

        Tesla would be smart to get people to test drive a Model 3 while they are still filling reservations. That would keep the pipe full, and continue to grow the brand.

    3. Murrysville EV says:

      My 12 Leaf lost 15% in 3 years (26k miles), and its winter range dropped as low as 36 miles (actual, not per the guess-o-meter).

      At the end of my lease, they wanted $13k to buy it (after the $5k Nissan discount). I offered $9k – which they refused – and it was sold at auction for about $7k if I had to guess. There was no way I was going to buy it.

      Nissan lost my EV business for a variety of reasons. If Leaf 2.0 resembles the concept car – double yuk.

  13. I hope we see the new Leaf at the New York auto show (in April?). Waiting all the way until September will make it very hard for me to consider the new Leaf to replace ours.

    The Bolt EV is here NOW, in Massachusetts. And we would have to SEE and DRIVE the new Leaf before we can decide to get one.

  14. georgeS says:

    cool.
    It should be interesting to see…..lots of questions like how the pack is cooled.

    1. ffbj` says:

      I thought it was going to be the same. Air cooled.

      To have an actively managed cooling system or not. Aye, that’s the question, whether ’tis nobler in the mind of man to save a few dollars, and have the battery pack degrade that much faster, or to take up liquid to manage that pack, and thereby extend it’s life.
      Aye, there’s the rub.

      1. georgeS says:

        ffbj,
        Yeh that:)

      2. Josh Bryant says:

        Just want to point out that active air cooling is a possibility too, unlike the passive air cooling in the current LEAF.

        http://insideevs.com/heres-nissan-employs-active-air-cooling-e-nv200-battery-pack/

      3. SparkEV says:

        I wouldn’t say current Leaf pack is air cooled. “Cooled” implies some sort of heat sink fins, like the air cooled gas engine. Leaf has nothing like that.

        What I’d like to see for “air cooling” is Soul EV that uses AC cooled air. It may not be as good as liquid cooling, but it’s much simpler and far better than no cooling of Leaf.

      4. MikeM says:

        That ffbj: Him talk funny`.

        1. MikeM says:

          Sorry ffbj`. That snark was directed at someone else, but hit you!

    2. Klaus says:

      Agreed. The leaf’s batteries have not held up well over time/miles, particularly for those in hot environments.

      I’m not sure I trust Nissan’s battery longevity enough to buy from them again tbh.

      1. Murrysville EV says:

        Agreed. My battery degradation occurred in a cool climate (Pittsburgh). The car seemed to like warmer weather, actually.

        1. Mike says:

          Our 2013 leaf in Cincinnati has over 42,000 miles and still has all 12 bars showing. It has definitely lost some range and I keep waiting for that first bar to drop but it hasn’t happened yet.

          1. William says:

            Your 12 bar 2013 Leaf is 2K miles ahead of mine and, I’m expecting a bar loss before summer an 48 months of use.

        2. MikeM says:

          I’ve read that Lithium batteries actually perform best around 80ºF give or take a few.

          I also see best mi/kWh in hottish weather if I can manage to hold off using the A/C.

      2. EV Livin' says:

        My 2011 Leaf lost 4th bar at 53k miles. Warranty replacement battery now has 30k miles on it (83k total on car) and I estimate about 2-5% loss in capacity. Lizardtech battery is tremendously better than first gen battery. All driving in SoCal.

  15. DNAinaGoodWay says:

    60 kWh? .2 cd? < 3 sec 0-60? 300 mile range? All for $30k? (After credit)

    Hey, I can dream can't I?

  16. LOL says:

    Nissan are beheaded right now, as Tesla released no tangible info on Model 3 range. They are quite aware that if they go with 300 mile Leaf it would mean axing their beloved diesel engines, which they cherish so dearly. Tesla made a smart smart move, not disclosing anything, so the followers’ pack (traditional lovers of diesels) is being kept in dark. I just hope Tesla is capable of reaching and exceeding 300 mile mark, in June 2017. So long Nissan.

    1. CLIVE says:

      LOL – YOU ARE TELLING BASELESS STORIES

  17. bro1999 says:

    Why such a compressed timeline between reveal and the start of sales? The production Bolt was unveiled about 11 months prior to it going on sale. Even the Model 3 was unveiled a year ago (be it in pre-production form), and it will be at least 18 months between initial unveil and the first sales.

    The production Model 3 may have not been unveiled yet, but I believe the exterior styling of the 3 is more or less known.

      1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        Exactly.

  18. David says:

    Interesting! My Leaf’s PCP runs out in June and I’ve already got a Hyundai Ioniq Electric on its way, so Nissan have missed the boat for getting my business … oh well, maybe in 2020 when the contract on the Ioniq expires!

    Still keen to see what they’ve come up with after all this radio silence and dropped-hints …

    1. Gilles says:

      Would you share the lease cost offer you got on the Ioniq? Thanks!

  19. Toni says:

    From the recent spy shots it was quite obvious that the new Leaf is just a big restyling of the current platform. Just a bigger battery and updated exterior won’t be enough if it is released after the M3. The 200 mile range will seem outdated once we get the M3 70D…

    1. Klaus says:

      Apples vs Oranges. The next leaf will likely cost much less than a model 3 with an upgraded battery and dual motor option.

    2. Another (Euro) industrial point of view says:

      Indeed but not sure as it seems this camouflaged Nissan Leaf is just a test car for the “Nissan Intelligent mobility” system (a Leaf with a long nose basically)and not the new 2018 Nissan Leaf (I hope at least).
      I got that impression by reading a January 7th article on Electrek that was showing this same “long nose” Nissan Leaf but without the camouflage this time.

  20. Pete says:

    September ? Come on Nissan I thought earlier.

  21. Someone out there says:

    September is a disappointment. Apparently they are OK with Tesla stealing their thunder. They really need to show the car before Tesla does or it will just be a “meh” event, unless they will come up with something really spectacular which I doubt. But at least we have something now.

    1. Someone out there says:

      Having said that, on the other hand Nissan might have a couple of aces up their sleeve. If the car has a 60 kWh battery, better aerodynamics, better interior, cost about the same as the Bolt EV and had a better charger (120+ kW) they could still have a pretty good and competitive car despite the 3.

      1. Assaf says:

        Market-wise, there’s plenty of room for everyone to go for the mainstream customer with a 200-mile BEV, rather than quibble amongst themselves on the much smaller pool of already-convinced.
        That should be their #1 goal.

        However, in the process they’ve once again screwed their original Leaf customer base. Waiting till September to know anything at all, will be too late for most people leasing a 24 kWh Leaf, esp. when the Bolt is already available in most Leaf hotspot locations, and the Model 3 already being a better-known quantity than the still-mysterious Gen 2 Leaf.

        1. William says:

          The much anticipated Tesla model 3 will be difficult to obtain in 2018, if you didn’t preorder last year and, your holding out for an inexpensive base model, without all the cool, must have, extras. The Leaf 2.0 , 2018 Bolt and the other 200+ EVs that pop up, should be able to be driven right off all of the 50 states Stealership lots, once payment has been arranged.

          The Tesla growing pains are going to be tough to watch, with the ramp up to the Model 3 pre order fulfillment. I hope the non reservation Tesla drive and buy public will be able to hold out until the end of next summer. There might be a few Nissan Leaf 2.0 and Bolt 30 month leases that will be too tempting for the masses to resist, until The Model 3 no longer becomes supply constrained some time probably in 2019.

  22. Unfortunately the new LEAF will not look anything like that cool IDS concept car. Nissan is way too conservative for that. Not sure if it was good or bad for Carlos Ghosn to vacate the CEO seat.

    1. William says:

      Cool concept EV cars rarely make it into production, especially the IDS Leaf and, the early GM Bolt concept with the Clear roof.

      1. Toni says:

        BMW i8, BMW i3, Tesla S, Tesla X, Tesla 3….

        1. William says:

          BMW I 3 is a Luke Warm Cool offering, but I 8 and anything Tesla are the rare exceptions to everything else being pretty bland. I 8 is not an 100% EV

  23. Tim Miser says:

    Too little too late for me. I got the 12 month extension on my leaf last year but that expired last month and I had to give the car back. I’ll be getting a Bolt next month when they come to Washington in April. Too bad for Nissan. They squandered another loyal customer by dragging their feet on releasing Leaf 2.0.

  24. Alan says:

    Most likely too late for me now, gutted.

    It wouldn’t surprise me if the delay is to allow LG Chem time to ramp up and supply Nissan with the battery ?

  25. Assaf says:

    If we know nothing about it till September, how can we decide whether to extend a lease that expires before September, rather than go get a Bolt, or even an Ioniq or eGolf?

    That’s actually our situation. Our already-extended lease expires July. Given it’s our only car, I *really* feel like having a car that can go camping far from home this summer, without needing to rent one.

    In short, Nissan’s Leaf-upgrade rollout planning and timing continues to suck. The last time they got it right was with the 2013.

  26. Jon arne says:

    Norwegian leaf 2011 one first owners in Norway. 95000 km drives god cars driving

  27. Dean Dey says:

    Ironically, I just returned my leased 2013 Leaf today. No news except some spy shots a couple of weeks ago (Those usually happen more than a year before availability)
    I got tired of waiting, and no information from Nissan. Now what do we know? A tentative date, and what a IDS concept looks like, which (based on the spy shots) is NOT what the Leaf2 looks like.

    1. William says:

      Those spy shots are hopefully not the production 2018 Leaf 2.0. There may be a few more teases that might indicate differently before this September to Remember.

  28. Dudamus says:

    Great news. Looking forward to seeing millions of LEAFs, Bolts, and Tesla 3s on the road. The future is slowly creeping up on us. I just hope people re not waiting years for a Tesla or New Leaf, there are plenty of EV options available today.

  29. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    Well, I don’t follow Nissan nearly as closely as I follow Tesla Inc., but based on articles posted here at InsideEVs, it seems the Leaf 2.0 has been delayed quite a bit longer than industry watchers expected.

    My guess is that Nissan has decided to make significant changes to the Leaf 2.0 to better compete with the Model 3 and the Bolt EV.

    Here’s hoping that those changes include putting in a liquid cooling system for the battery pack. Last I read, Nissan was still stubbornly sticking with passive cooling. Going forward, that’s just not going to be able to compete with other, better engineered plug-in EVs.

    It’s not just that relying on passive cooling leads to premature battery aging, it’s also that it puts sharp limits on how fast the battery pack can be charged en route. The latter, alone, is going to make the Leaf seem increasingly obsolete if Nissan doesn’t switch to an active cooling system.

  30. Iletric says:

    Nissan is taking the Osborne effect to extremes.

  31. Nicholas says:

    Nissan is kinda desperate with the lease extension, rightfully so.

    Behind the scenes, they don’t seem like a good company. I went to the Leaf factory and talked with workers and salespeople. They are paid very little.

  32. Get Real says:

    Range, price, engineering (liquid cooling) and looks all matter here.

    For instance, IF Nissan delivers a 200 mile range IDS styled Leaf at a 30k price point for the basic trim (it would GREATLY help if it has active cooling/good battery warranty), then they won’t be able to make enough of them.

    However, really the only that Nissan has delivered so far with their now wilted Leaf Gen 1 is on a relatively low price.

    In order to compete with the Bolt and Model 3 they are really going to have to up their game tremendously.

  33. Vexar says:

    I will be so very disappointed if a design like this doesn’t break the sound barrier and rip holes in the air like a jet aircraft at speeds over 175MPH.

  34. Dave M says:

    I have a 2013 with 47k miles, and just picked up a 2017 a few days ago. TO me, the 2017 is a HUGE increase in range. Sure, the 2018 with 200+ mile range capability is awesome, but at what price? My 2017 Leaf post rebate in CA…was $20k less that what you can buy a new Chevy Bolt for. Not in the same price class. Doesn’t make sense to compare the prev Leaf to anything coming out…not now at least.

    Looking forward to seeing what they come up with tho, and glad I got in on the 2017. Yes, I would LOVE a 2018, but not for the price.

  35. DonaldTob says:

    Как быть в такой ситуации
    надо быть

    1. MikeM says:

      Que será, será.

  36. silversod says:

    I think I’ll be better off waiting for the new model to come out before I get a Leaf, there should be a lot of used 2014/15 Leafs at cheaper prices than there is now.

  37. Pete says:

    Update, they delete the twitter channel. The employee was fired :-).

  38. Accent says:

    Even uglier than the older Leaf. Do these designers spend their time watching kid’s cartoon shows? Looks as if that is where the inspiration comes from

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