Massachusetts Considers Offering Plug-In Vehicle Purchase Incentives; HOV Lane Access for EVs

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 5

Boston in All its Beauty

Boston in All its Beauty

There will be meeting held in Massachusetts this September to ink out more details and by next year a plan should be finalized.

Nothing specific is on the books yet, but the general idea is to find a way to bring down the purchase cost of electric vehicles.  That sure sounds like some sort of purchase rebate, tax credit or other type of incentive to us.

It’s further believed that HOV-lane access may be part of the package in Massachusetts.

We hope to know more in September.

Source: North Andover

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5 responses to "Massachusetts Considers Offering Plug-In Vehicle Purchase Incentives; HOV Lane Access for EVs"

  1. pjwood says:

    Tesla’s are also selling well. Volt and Tesla sell about equal, as far as I can tell. The Prius blends in with the zillions of others. Any other state do this retro-actively, or am I out of luck?

  2. Spec says:

    Yeah, I’m fairly certain that access to the carpool lane is helping sell EVs and PHEVs in California. The carpool lane is filled with Volts, Leafs, and Model S cars these days.

  3. brainknow says:

    50,000 EV each keeps an average of $2,000 in local economy or about $100,000,000 each year instead of sending it overseas. Any incentive is a great policy of investing locally. GA does $5k for leasing or buying EV’s. Atlanta is no. 4 in the nation for EV due to that policy (and a $0.013 per KWH overnight electric rate)

    1. Spec says:

      Yeah, the fact that EVs create local jobs should be stressed more. People to run the power plants, people to drill for natural gas, people to run nuke plants, people to upgrade the grids, people to install solar PV, people to install wind turbines, people to install chargers, etc. All pretty much 100% domestic jobs.

      1. pjwood says:

        I know the Dpt of Pub Utility folks get this, in MA. State energy departments have a much different task than national policy. Without natural fossil resources, renewables can become a full court press. We paid some of the highest natural gas prices in the nation, last year. Up to a fairly sustainted $30 per mmbtu during Q1, while the rest of the country paid $4-5. Power was 20 cents, wholesale, per kwh to some of the power co’s who didn’t have contracts. While I’m mostly for the “press”, I also think it is insane not to build more NG pipes. They’re more focused on putting >1,000 windmills in the ocean.