Kia To Test Autonomous Soul EV In Nevada

2 years ago by Mark Kane 9

Kia Autonomous Driving Soul EV

Kia Autonomous Driving Soul EV

Robin Allender, Deputy Administrator of Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles, and (right) Dr. Tae-Won Lim, Vice President, Central Advanced Research and Engineering Institute of Hyundai Motor Group

Robin Allender, Deputy Administrator of Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles, and (right) Dr. Tae-Won Lim, Vice President, Central Advanced Research and Engineering Institute of Hyundai Motor Group

A lot is going on in Nevada these days.  Tesla, Faraday…now you can add Hyundai/Kia.

The state recently granted Kia permission to test autonomous driving technologies on public roads.

Kia announced earlier a road map to partially-autonomous cars by 2020 and fully-autonomous by 2030.

The all-electric Soul EV is used as the test bed for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems in Beatty, Nevada:

“Kia – together with sister company Hyundai – hopes to experiment with partially- and fully-autonomous driving technologies in real-world conditions, an important part of its roadmap for autonomous driving.

Kia plans to introduce a range of partially-autonomous driving technologies to its model line-up including eco-friendly vehicles by 2020, and is aiming to bring its first fully-autonomous car to market by 2030. The initial stage of investment by Kia and Hyundai – totalling US$2 billion by 2018 – will enable the companies to develop new Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) technologies and employ a greater number of engineers. The investment will lead to the introduction of next-generation smart vehicles in the coming years.”

Kia Autonomous Driving Soul EV

Kia Autonomous Driving Soul EV

Dr. Tae-Won Lim, Vice President, Central Advanced Research and Engineering Institute of Hyundai Motor Group, commented:

“A great deal of research and rigorous product testing is being undertaken in order to make the ‘self-driving car’ a reality. Thanks to this license we will be able to accelerate the testing of our new autonomous driving technologies that are currently in the early stages of development, with particular emphasis on our alternative powertrain vehicles. We are confident that our latest innovations – both for partially- and fully-autonomous driving – will ultimately make driving safer for all road users.”

More about the research topic:

Kia Advanced Driver Assistance System
Kia is planning to introduce a range of partially-autonomous ADAS technologies in the coming years, with an array of new functions anticipated for introduction to market by 2020. These include Traffic Jam Assist (TJA), Highway Autonomous Driving (HAD), Urban Autonomous Driving (UAD), Emergency Stop System (ESS), and Autonomous Valet Parking technologies.

At all times, the new range of ADAS technologies can be circumvented by direct driver control, enabling closer control of the car as desired.

These new technologies will join the suite of features already offered by Kia on its latest production vehicles, including the Sorento and the soon-to-be-launched all-new Optima and Sportage. These technologies are primarily designed to make driving safer and easier for Kia customers by identifying hazards at the earliest possible opportunity and allowing the driver – or the car – to take the appropriate reaction. Existing Kia technologies include Lane Departure Warning System (LDWS), Lane Keeping Assist System (LKAS), Blind Spot Detection (BSD), Auto Emergency Braking (AEB) and Advanced Smart Cruise Control (ASCC).

Kia plans to bring fully-autonomous cars to market within 15 years

Over the longer-term, Kia is targeting 2030 for the introduction of fully-autonomous vehicles. As a key part of Kia’s development of fully-autonomous driving technologies – the true ‘self-driving car’ – Kia is focusing R&D resources on vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) and vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication.

By enabling cars to effectively communicate directly and independently with their surroundings, Kia will be able to make ADAS-equipped vehicles as safe and efficient as possible.”

Kia Autonomous Driving Soul EV

Kia Autonomous Driving Soul EV

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9 responses to "Kia To Test Autonomous Soul EV In Nevada"

  1. Ambulator says:

    Well, sure. Given California’s ridiculous over regulation of self driving cars Nevada is a fine choice.

  2. Scott says:

    I’d be happy with Soul EV for sale in Arizona.

  3. Anon says:

    Since Tesla released Firmware Update 7.0, there now seems to be a mad rush of PR from other automakers developing / releasing / partenering up, for this sea-change in vehicular autonomy.

    The pebble was dropped, the ripples radiate outward…

    1. sven says:

      Or other automakers such as Toyota have been working on autonomous driving the last couple of years and haven’t been publicizing it.

      How else would you explain that “Toyota spent the last couple of years filing hundreds of patents related to autonomous driving.” “Toyota’s 1,400 patents outstripped any other automaker or tech company by a factor of two.”

      http://arstechnica.com/cars/2016/01/toyota-has-1400-self-driving-car-patentstwice-as-many-as-any-other-company/

      1. Djoni says:

        Right Sven!
        But we can’t see a trend in Toyota PR as they have use it much more than anyone else for their FCEV.
        So I guess, they sometime do lot of PR for not much of a product.

        My skepticism would add, for a product that will mostly never make it!

      2. jh says:

        Patents is for lockin and wars. Not actual products

  4. Pete Bauer says:

    Hello Kia

    BMW has made it big with the 2015-Dec sales of their i3, i8 and X5 Plugin.

    Can you please expand the sales of Soul-EV to all the 50 states and increase the sales.

    Having spent so much money on developing the manufacturing the product, it does not make sense to sell it only in 10 states and keeping it as compliance car.

  5. Video shows the different modes of the system:

    1. GasKilla says:

      Nice share. How long till this tech hits the roads? 4 years? Seems like a far way off when the are showing it works today, or does it actually work today?