It Looks Like Tesla Motors Will Be Able To Sell Cars Directly In Texas Soon

1 year ago by Steven Loveday 39

Tesla Gallery In Houston, Texas(Image: Josh B/InsideEVs)

Tesla Gallery In Houston, Texas (Image Credit: Josh B/InsideEVs)

Texas is one of five states that do not currently allow citizens to purchase Tesla’s electric cars, due to the “direct sales”, “no middle man” approach. Tesla has been battling with Texas lawmakers since 2013 to try to rectify the situation. The automaker has finally won an endorsement from GOP convention delegates, a huge momentum swing for the company.

Newly Refreshed Model S

Newly Refreshed Tesla Model S

The current state law allows people to see Tesla’s vehicles in three area/galleries. They are located in Dallas/Fort Worth, Austin, and Houston.

However, interested buyers can only test drive by appointment, Thursday through Sunday with a previously approved permit. Vehicles cannot be bought on site, nor can the Tesla rep mention price, take orders, or inform the interested consumer of website information.

Once a buyer decides to follow through with a purchase, he/she must purchase online. The car will be delivered with California registration and have to be re-registered by the buyer. Service may be performed at one of Texas’ four service centers, but appointments and service-related issues must also proceed through California offices first.

GOP convention delegates have now agreed to allow Tesla to sell vehicles in Texas. Over 90% were in support of the new legislation. This came regardless of pleas from two top GOP members that have continued to work against such measures. U.S. Representative Roger Williams and Republican National Committee member Bill Crocker, both affiliated with car dealerships, made another attempt to steer the legislation in the other direction.

Major automakers have continually trumped Tesla on campaign contributions. Tesla has upped spending this year and it seems to have paid off. The small company put $1.3 million into lobbyists, compared to dealers only spending $1 million.

Tesla’s Texas spokesman, David White, spoke with thousands of delegates at the recent Dallas convention. He explained that most were shocked about the current laws in Texas and their impact on companies like Tesla. White said:

“If Texas is truly ‘wide open’ for business, our elected officials should take the appropriate steps to end these frivolous regulations in 2017.”

Source: The Dallas Morning News

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39 responses to "It Looks Like Tesla Motors Will Be Able To Sell Cars Directly In Texas Soon"

  1. Ziv says:

    Texas has been moving pretty aggressively to encourage wind generation, telling the car dealers to take a flying leap and allowing the Tesla vehicles to be sold more easily is a good move for them.

    1. evcarstugatso says:

      The Land of the Free ! BULL **** !! FREE ENTERPRIZE!!~….l m f a o ….Most would never believe what really goes on., In, “The Land of the free”., Which is Run “TOTALLY” by the Elite & the 5% Richest People of the world who own 95% of everything..
      ..BTW…..That is only a Meaningless Slogan!!!

      1. Lad says:

        Th whole country is run by paid off greedy politicians; Texas is but one example. Notice how quickly the Republicans changed the rules when Tesla put money on the hood…pretty damn disgusting.

        1. mo says:

          The problem is Texas will convene for another vote in 2years from I believe…The automakers will have plenty of time to bribe, bribe away until then.

      2. Texas FFE says:

        You guys make me sick, you know nothing about Texas but think you know everything. Texas may not be as progress as California but it follows close behind. Texas is so popular and growing so fast pretty soon we are going to have to put up fences on southern AND northern borders to keep people out.

        1. Texas FFE says:

          Actually I don’t mind people moving to Texas as long as they bring their electric cars or money to buy new ones.

        2. Steven says:

          And could you make that northern fence really tall, please.

          1. Rick Danger says:

            Make them all really tall.

        3. Epicurus says:

          Companies are flocking to Texas because of low or no taxes (no personal income tax), but of course there are downsides like one of the five highest poverty rates in the nation, the craziest members of the state board of education, some of the worst schools in the country, the worst air quality, etc.

    2. Tim says:

      Texas is an enigma on that topic. Amazing how “progressive” they are about wind considering the overall political leaning of the state. Just goes to show that stereotypes don’t always play out like one might imagine.

      1. Epicurus says:

        The only reason there is a wind industry in Texas is because there’s money in it. Aside from Austin, most Texans don’t care about air quality, and they think anthropogenic climate change is a worldwide socialist conspiracy.

  2. SparkEV says:

    Minor point, but I read “Nearly 90 percent of the more than 8,000 delegates”, but insideevs has it as over 90%. Either way, glad to see socialist republicans being beaten by such huge margin. Hopefully the few states that remain will be beaten by such wide margin as well.

    1. Rightofthepeople says:

      “socialist republicans”

      While there are certainly a few of those, it would seem there are far more socialist democrats than socialist republicans. Sorry, that’s just an odd insult for anyone on this site to throw at republicans. If you plan to vote D in the presidential election this year, you will either be voting for an open socialist or a closet socialist, depending on who finally wins the D primary.

      1. Tim says:

        Claiming Hilary Clinton as a closet socialist is just so utterly ridiculous. You can disagree with her policies or even dislike her, but facts are facts. No one who is as close to the financial services industry as Hilary can be factually labeled a socialist.

      2. scott franco (No M3 FAUX GRILL!) says:

        To SparkEV, an avowed socialist, it makes total sense. Socialists/democrats think in very simple terms, to wit:

        1. I am a socialist.
        2. I advocate socialist policies.
        3. Anyone who advocates what I do is a socialist.

        There was an excellent demonstration of this on PBS news with Gwen Ifill, who expressed surprise to learn that republicans had backed the civil rights bill of the 60’s under Johnson. That is, we are democrats, we are the party of civil rights, republicans cannot possibly be interested in civil rights (despite the fact that our party was in fact founded on fundamental civil rights).

        1. SparkEV says:

          “To SparkEV, an avowed socialist”

          Me a socialist? LOL. It’s too bad there isn’t a sarcasm font. I got out of GOP long ago, because of too many socialist policies they were pushing and closet socialist like Trump: government’s going to do this, government’s going to do that, all the while collecting even more taxes (read my lips!)

          Simple fact is, dealers preventing internet sales via government mandate is exactly the stuff socialists would do to “protect the workers”, never mind that those workers will find other jobs, probably better (no more oil change!)

          1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

            Dear Americans, socialism and statism are very different things.

        2. TomArt says:

          During most of the 20th century, the parties did a flip – the dems used to be the refuge of the racist and the dominant party of the south, now the reps are. There are similar trends with economic policy flips, etc.

          A result of that shift is that there was a substantial amount of overlap between the parties in the 50s-60s. There used to be “union republicans” and “pro-life democrats” and whatnot. Now, anyone with a political career at stake can’t openly admit to any “moderate” position on something – that’s as ugly as “compromise” these days…

          1. Nix says:

            In the 1940’s-1950’s, “Union Republicans” were just called “Republicans”. The majority position of the party was strongly pro-Union. Here is the official 1956 Republican Party Platform on Labor, bragging about advancements for Unions and support for Pro-Union demands:

            “…The record of performance of the Republican Administration on behalf of our working men and women goes still further. The Federal minimum wage has been raised for more than 2 million workers. Social Security has been extended to an additional 10 million workers and the benefits raised for 6 1/2 million. The protection of unemployment insurance has been brought to 4 million additional workers. There have been increased workmen’s compensation benefits for longshoremen and harbor workers, increased retirement benefits for railroad employees, and wage increases and improved welfare and pension plans for federal employees.

            In addition, the Eisenhower Administration has enforced more vigorously and effectively than ever before, the laws which protect the working standards of our people.

            Workers have benefited by the progress which has been made in carrying out the programs and principles set forth in the 1952 Republican platform. All workers have gained and unions have grown in strength and responsibility, and have increased their membership by 2 millions.

            Furthermore, the process of free collective bargaining has been strengthened by the insistence of this Administration that labor and management settle their differences at the bargaining table without the intervention of the Government. This policy has brought to our country an unprecedented period of labor-management peace and understanding.

            We applaud the effective, unhindered, collective bargaining which brought an early end to the 1956 steel strike, in contrast to the six months’ upheaval, Presidential seizure of the steel industry and ultimate Supreme Court intervention under the last Democrat Administration.

            The Eisenhower Administration will continue to fight for dynamic and progressive programs which, among other things, will:

            Stimulate improved job safety of our workers, through assistance to the States, employees and employers;

            Continue and further perfect its programs of assistance to the millions of workers with special employment problems, such as older workers, handicapped workers, members of minority groups, and migratory workers [Editor’s note: “Migratory Workers” was the correct term in the 1950’s, for people who are now called the derogatory term “illegals” (or worse) by the current party leaders.]

            Revise and improve the Taft-Hartley Act so as to protect more effectively the rights of labor unions, management, the individual worker, and the public. The protection of the right of workers to organize into unions and to bargain collectively is the firm and permanent policy of the Eisenhower Administration. In 1954, 1955 and again in 1956, President Eisenhower recommended constructive amendments to this Act. The Democrats in Congress have consistently blocked these needed changes by parliamentary maneuvers. The Republican Party pledges itself to overhaul and improve the Taft-Hartley Act along the lines of these recommendations.”

            Famous slogan of the 2016 Presidential candidate for the same party?

            “Your Fired!”

  3. scott franco (No M3 FAUX GRILL!) says:

    This issue with “dealer only” states would be solved in 5 minutes by disallowing the states from charging sales tax on cars bought out of state.

    1. Nix says:

      And how are you going to do that, when the power to levy state sales taxes is purely a power reserved to the states?

      Why is it that pro-state’s rights folks rarely understand how that term actually applies under the Constitution?

  4. kdawg says:

    There is also a new bill being put forth in Michigan in favor of Tesla.

    http://www.clickondetroit.com/automotive/michigans-anti-tesla-law-to-change

    1. Josh says:

      Wonder if that will be in time for Model 3?

  5. William says:

    So you can legislate fairness in the largest state in the nation. All it took was more grease for the wheels. Wind power and wide adoption of Tesla model 3 will make this state a leader in this particular energy transformation. Gunna take a spell of course.

    1. Stimpacker says:

      More grease?

      “The small company put $1.3 million into lobbyists, compared to dealers only spending $1 million”

      Sounds more like pay to play.

      Whatever happened to a government by the people, for the people?

      1. sven says:

        Well, the rank and file Texas GOP convention delegates said eff you GOP party bosses with “over 90%” of delegates voting in support of the new legislation. “This came regardless of pleas from two top GOP members [party bosses] that have continued to work against such measures.” This sounds more like a rebellion within the Texas GOP.

      2. Steven says:

        Government for, of, and by the people was bought and paid for by big corporations. They rallied their lobbyists, and paid off their representatives. Why else would projects like the F35 have components coming from forty-two different states, everyone wants a slice of that pie. Otherwise, it would have been built at one site, using the most cost efficient means.

      3. Epicurus says:

        “Whatever happened to a government by the people, for the people?”

        It never existed. This is one of many myths taught to us by ignorant, non-thinking teachers.

        At the gitgo, the majority of the people weren’t allowed to vote. Now the vote of many people is actively suppressed.

    2. alohart says:

      Did Alaska legislate fairness? Or was it the second largest state, Texas?

      1. TX NRG says:

        Neither. There won’t be any legislation until the next session and a straw poll of delegates at a convention does not equate to a sure thing for reforming the longstanding TX dealership laws.

  6. sven says:

    Well, the rank and file Texas GOP convention delegates said eff you GOP party bosses with “over 90%” of delegates voting in support of the new legislation. “This came regardless of pleas from two top GOP members [party bosses] that have continued to work against such measures.” This sounds more like a rebellion within the Texas GOP.

  7. Nix says:

    “U.S. Representative Roger Williams and Republican National Committee member Bill Crocker, both affiliated with car dealerships, made another attempt to steer the legislation in the other direction.”

    They should be recusing themselves from legislation that directly impacts their special interests.

    That is why Texas needs ethics reforms. Sadly, the same politicians who benefit personally from legislation that they vote for, rejected “An amendment requiring recusal when members could benefit financially from the bills they pass”

    https://www.texastribune.org/2015/04/20/ethics-bill-headed-senate-floor/

  8. Bacardi says:

    SpaceX has 9 facilities, 3 are located in TX which is more than any other state including Cali…1 of 3 launch sites is in TX and the state also house the companies only development facility…Musk broke ground with Gov Perry on them…It was only a matter of time…

  9. St John says:

    It’s humorous to hear how corrupt some Third World countries governments are, then you read how most of them studied in the United States. I guess they learn from the best

    1. Steven says:

      +1

  10. Loboc says:

    I don’t see how convention delegates translates into legislative action. Unless the thinking is that these are GOP reps and can influence the Texas House and Senate. Let’s wait and see how their influence is greater than lobbyists.

  11. TomArt says:

    [quote]
    He explained that most were shocked about the current laws in Texas and their impact on companies like Tesla.
    [end quote]

    That’s how it works. Ignorance is what gets too many of us (myself included) to click on a bait article anywhere in the media, only to find out that the law change, or proposed law change, isn’t that big of a deal. Or, in this case, people have no idea what’s going on.

    Keep people busy and distracted, whether it’s keeping food on the table with 2 part-time jobs, or burning out your kids on meaningless structure 7 days a week…no time nor energy to keep up with all the shenanigans at the top.

    It has little to do with intelligence, or even socioeconomic status (some genuine, lower-middle-class “redneck” neighbors of mine back home thought both Bushes were idiots and voted Dem in those elections).

    We’re all running around like chickens fresh off the chopping block, while the politicians keep going to the bank.

  12. Epicurus says:

    “GOP convention delegates have now agreed to allow Tesla to sell vehicles in Texas.”

    Convention delegates don’t make the law in Texas. I doubt they influence in the least the legislators who do.

    Get real.

    1. RobertM says:

      Convention delegates don’t make the law in Texas. — Epicurus

      Unless it is a Convention of the Texas legislators themselves then it can have a huge influence on what becomes law.