Irizar Introduces Electric Bus With 376 kWh Sodium Nickel Battery Pack

3 years ago by Mark Kane 9

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus - i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus – i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus - i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus – i2e

Irizar recently presented the i2eEl autobús del futuro.

The 12-meter long bus has autonomy of 200-250 km (124-155 miles). The first three of these buses have already been deployed on Spanish roads.

To achieve such high range, the Spanish company built the bus with a 376 kWh battery pack (larger than even BYD uses in its buses), but these are not lithium-ion cells, just Sodium Nickel.

Energy storage system. Batteries
Type: So-Nick
– Nominal voltage: 600V/650V
– Total capacity: 376 kWh
– Super condensers 125 V

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus - i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus – i2e

We don’t know exactly how well such a battery will work in a bus over time.  However, it seems that Irizar has bold plan for e-mobility with €60 million in spending scheduled.

“Investment and forecasts

“The group estimates a total planned investment of €60 million for the development of the electric bus and its production facilities.”

“The new production plant will be finished in 2016, and the demand for units prior to this date will be handled by existing facilities.”

Here is video promoting this bus of the future:

“Nuevo irizar i2e.
Cero emisiones.
100% eléctrico.
El autobús del futuro”

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus - i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus – i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus - i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus – i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus - i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus – i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus - i2e

The Irizar Group presents its first 100% electric city bus – i2e

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9 responses to "Irizar Introduces Electric Bus With 376 kWh Sodium Nickel Battery Pack"

  1. Kalle says:

    Never herd about SO-Nick batteries, what are their properties?

    1. DaveMart says:

      Its a high temperature technology, and the bus probably needs to be kept plugged in when not in use to prevent the battery freezing.

      The only technical write up I could find was for the old zebra battery:
      http://www.meridian-int-res.com/Projects/Zebra_Pages.pdf

      Summary:
      Could be a contender for heavy vehicle use as here or for grid storage and so on.
      Lithium is better for light vehicles.

      1. GSP says:

        Here is a link to a NaNiCl battery supplier. This is the same plant that used to make the “zebra” batteries. New owners, new product name.

        http://www.fiammsonick.com

        GSP

  2. Cavaron says:

    I wonder about the energy consumption in standby. If I extrapolate the Th!nks 28 kWh high-temp battery, which used about 2 kWh a day when not driving – this bus must need more than 24 kWh a day to keep the battery at operating temperature…

    1. DaveMart says:

      Read the link I provided.

      The energy consumption when not in use is there.

      It isn’t excessive and should be fine in this application, although it is not something that you would want in your car, which typically is in use for far less of the day than a bus.

      1. Dan says:

        The batteries do not need the heater running while in use. The I2R loss is enough to keep them hot. So the loss of energy really is for when the bus is fully charged and sitting around waiting to go on the road. The batteries can keep themselves warm for days. But it is best to plug in for charge and allow the AC to keep the batteries warm.

  3. David Murray says:

    You know, for a bus that is in constant use, there are other battery types that can work. If you think about the usage pattern of a bus. For example, most busses in that run city routes literally go weeks or months without their engine being shut off. Once those things are shut off, they are difficult to get restarted. So if the plan is to be constantly charging and discharging, a battery that is required to remain hot isn’t so much of a problem.

    Consumer use is a different case since the cars will sit unused a lot for hours or days at a time.

    1. Ellison says:

      Modern transit buses are turned off at every opportunity for emission and noise pollution reasons in the Bay Area and most other major cities now.

      They get really horrible mileage idling and it causes increased wear as well.

      Electric buses are the way to go. The electric BYD buses Stanford is buying are amazing.

    2. Rob says:

      ” busses in that run city routes literally go weeks or months without their engine being shut off. Once those things are shut off, they are difficult to get restarted.”
      Stupid comment!