Infographic: Chevy Spark EV 101: EV Etiquette

4 years ago by Inside EVs Staff 6

The question of “What’s proper plug-in vehicle etiquette?” always pops up and then gets answered in various ways.

Though there seems to be a general agreeance on what’s right and what’s wrong, some minute details are often argued upon.

General Motors thinks it has an firm understanding of “EV Etiquette,” so it felt inclined to release this infographic.

Here’s a condensed version of the description that GM provides with the graphic

“For many Spark EV owners, getting plugged-in to an all-electric, no-gas-required lifestyle will be a new experience.”

“Here are a few tips to ease the transition:”

SparkEVetiquette02

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6 responses to "Infographic: Chevy Spark EV 101: EV Etiquette"

  1. MTN Ranger says:

    Good ideas. But I still think FCFS (first come first served) for charging stations.

    1. Syrinx says:

      Spoken like a true PHEV driver 😉

      1. James says:

        Maybe, but I can charge up full in 2 hours and be gone… then you can sit there for as long as you want. Otherwise I’m waiting for you to fill the huge battery. We have one pole at work. We use FCFS, so the Volt gets in first, I go swap with him at lunch, when I’m done, I move to the garage and the iMiev has it the rest of the day.

        Using electric first, I never get a charge at all as by the time the iMiev is done, I’ve gone home. He works later (4x10s), so he doesn’t care to be first.

        My PHEV isn’t a second class charger. Are we then to go by who has the lowest charge %? Range to home or the next charge? First come first serve is most fair and easy. Otherwise we have a guide book so we all know who goes first, ok, you are full electric, but I’m low on gas, so I need to charge first but we both got ICE’d while arguing over the charger… 🙂

  2. Aaron says:

    I love the idea of a “pedestrian friendly alert function”. It’s almost like a “city horn” in some European and Asian vehicles.

    Even with the noise my i-MiEV makes at under 22 MPH, I still get people walking in front of my car. One of the other i-MiEV owners I know keeps a bicycle horn in the cup holder of his car for such situations.

    1. MTN Ranger says:

      The pedestrian alert on the Volt/Spark EV could be a little more subtle. When I use it, people are startled.