Hundreds of Remaining Better Place Cars End As Scrap

3 years ago by Mark Kane 10

Now You Can Rent a Renault Fluence Z.E. in Copenhagen

Renault Fluence Z.E.

Cost?  Not $500,000!

Battery swap station

Globes received from its sources interesting news and published article on a new scrapage plan for Renault Fluence Z.E. orphaned by Better Place.

As it turns out, Carasso Motors, importers of Renault and Nissan cars in Israel, “is turning hundreds of remaining Better Place cars into scrap, following Better Place’s liquidation in May 2013

We thought that the importer would try to sell them, but it seems that the fleet was damaged in storage at Ashdod Port.

“The cars were stored in Ashdod Port, where they were apparently damaged by being kept there for so long, and it is therefore not economically feasible to sell them on the market. At the same time, the leasing companies and Carasso itself are trying to sell the usable cars through various bargain campaigns.

Carasso said in response, “We intend to scrap mainly Renault Fluence electric cars damaged during their prolonged storage in Ashdod Port.”

Poor Fluence Z.E.  At least some of their 23.4 kWh battery packs found some 2nd life usfulness in the US.

Globes

Tags:

10 responses to "Hundreds of Remaining Better Place Cars End As Scrap"

  1. sven says:

    It doesn’t sound to me like they’re going to a better place.

    “Damaged in storage”? It’s a shame that Carasso Motors is as mismanaged and incompetant as Better Place. 🙁

  2. MDEV says:

    That is so sad now to file claims to the insurance company……

    1. gsned57 says:

      There really isn’t any better explanation. That’s exactly what I thought when reading the article.

      At the same time I can’t believe that if you lowered the price enough folks wouldn’t buy them. Crazy

  3. Assaf says:

    Ashdod is notorious as a place to buy used cars from. Their bodies get corroded not just from the sea, but also from the poorly-regulated heavy industries near the port.

    One can only imagine what that chemical pollution does to human bodies living or working nearby (disclaimer: I worked near the Ashdod port for 2 years, our building was relatively modern with climate-control and filters but you never know).

    In related news, our friends here reported that their ex-Better-Place friend there finally decided to get rid of his Fluence ZE and sold it for some NIS $22k or so, which is the typical price for a 6-8 year old ICE Renault.

    OTOH my sister has friends who still cling to their ZE (they were not BP employees, just hapless customers). It is perfect for the woman’s daily commute of ~20km each way. But they dare not take it for any other excursion, b/c there’s no L2 infrastructure to speak of, and the ZE trickle cable unlike the US Leaf’s, is a bit too demanding for ordinary Israeli 220V outlets.

  4. Assaf says:

    Looking at actual online ads, Fluence ZE owners are trying to sell them for anywhere between NIS $40k and 69k.

    The higher-end prices don’t seem to sell very fast…

    1. Assaf says:

      At the risk of further boring the 3 readers of this post, I looked more carefully at the Israeli analogue to craigslist (yad2.co.il, and it’s for pay AFAIK).

      The NIS 40-42k prices are actually buy offers.

      Sales asking prices are 53-69k, with the lower end on vehicles with 50k km or more.

      So perhaps my friends’ report on their friend’s sales price was wrong…

      Regardless, same-year ICE Fluence are advertised for NIS 70-90k with some heavily used ones as low as 58k. Not as big a gap as I would have expected between the ZE and ICE; perhaps it’s because Renault in general is a cheap used car in Israel.

      1. Jay Cole says:

        Actually (as a sidenote), the interest on anything “Better Place” has always been surprisingly strong…just looking at the analytics ~ just over 250 views in first ~2 hours published for this one.

        1. Assaf says:

          yeah but 249 of these views were mine 🙂

  5. Put them on ebay. Many DIY fans will like to buy one.

  6. arne-nl says:

    “The cars were stored in Ashdod Port, where they were apparently damaged by being kept there for so long,”

    The first thing that comes to mind is that they stored the cars at a low charge level and then forgot about them, allowing the batteries to drain completely.