Henrik Fisker Chimes In On Tesla Model 3

1 year ago by Eric Loveday 39

Tesla Model 3

Tesla Model 3

Henrik Fisker With Karma

Henrik Fisker With Karma

Former Fisker CEO Henrik Fisker was interviewed by BGR following the reveal of the Tesla Model 3.

Below we’ve highlighted a few quotes from Fisker. For the full interview, see the source link further down below:

“I believe good design is about finding beauty — an emotional connection with the consumer.”

“I love cars, I work on all types of cars, and I still think there’s something unique about jumping into a car, hearing the gear change, feeling the interaction with the mechanics.”

“As far as the pricing, I think it represents a good achievement,” Fisker said of the Model 3’s $35,000 price. “The car also looks like it will get you more for your money than from any other car that’s around $35,000. The way it sits and looks – I think it’s quite a good achievement. I also think they got right not making the car look strange. It’s a look that a lot of people feel is a good, acceptable look.

“From my point of view, it also looks like the consumer is not following the traditional buying pattern here. The traditional pattern is for consumers to almost pick a brand before they pick a car – based on things like familiarity and how established it is in the market. It’s clear from (the Model 3 unveiling) that consumers, when it comes to electric cars, they’re looking at maybe newer players that have more experience in new technology and are ‘cooler’ as a brand to be associated with and aren’t from the older car world.”

Full interview at source link below.

Source: BGR

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39 responses to "Henrik Fisker Chimes In On Tesla Model 3"

  1. Anon says:

    He would have put a “Joker” mouth, on the M3. 😉

  2. Clive says:

    Spot on !

    1. evcarnut says:

      Tesla doesn’t need Fisker’s 2 cents worth . He’s so F O S That his eyes balls are probably brown…He blew it it with Tesla long ago & nobody cares to hear his Bull Sh!t….

  3. scott franco (the evil EV owning republican) says:

    “From my point of view, it also looks like the consumer is not following the traditional buying pattern here. The traditional pattern is for consumers to almost pick a brand before they pick a car – based on things like familiarity and how established it is in the market. It’s clear from (the Model 3 unveiling) that consumers, when it comes to electric cars, they’re looking at maybe newer players that have more experience in new technology and are ‘cooler’ as a brand to be associated with and aren’t from the older car world.”

    How the heck is Tesla NOT a brand pick? The Tesla brand generates more interest than perhaps any brand outside of Apple. 100,000 people, including me, put $1000 down on their new car before they even showed it.

    1. Daniel says:

      Now Now, Don’t hurt yourself.Seems you are over reacting. Perhaps you should re-read the quote you posted from the article and tell me where it states that Tesla is “not a brand pick”. I’ll wait here.

      1. Yup says:

        Well no, he’s right. Here’s the quote you were waiting for…

        “From my point of view, it also looks like the consumer is not following the traditional buying pattern here. The traditional pattern is for consumers to almost pick a brand before they pick a car”

        In this case, since about 200,000 people put down $1000 on a car they had not even seen yet, that means that they were choosing the brand before the car.

        1. Mint says:

          The point is that they are not choosing the brand based on familiarity and history. They’re mostly first-time Tesla buyers.

          There’s really no argument that the way Tesla marketed and sold (well, kinda) the Model 3 is an entirely new paradigm for the auto industry.

          1. Yup says:

            “The point is that they are not choosing the brand based on familiarity and history. They’re mostly first-time Tesla buyers.”

            No, that’s wrong. They ARE choosing it because of familiarity and history. The Model S has been all over the news, beating up on gas powered cars left and right. They are familiar with the brand’s previous product and it’s successful history, which is why they’re choosing the Tesla brand, despite never having seen the Model 3. So anyways, the point remains that they are choosing the brand, not the car.

            I’m not even saying it’s a bad thing to do, and I’m a Tesla fan myself, but Scott’s point is still correct.

            1. Mint says:

              3 years hardly counts as “history”. By comparison, Toyota’s reputation took many decades to build, and Hyundai took ages to shed its junk label.

              The familiarity that Fisker is talking about is personal, i.e. brand loyalty due to previous ownership or experiences. That’s a big factor in car sales for the established players.

              Just hearing about a brand isn’t anything new, so clearly that’s not what Fisker is talking about. Yes, maybe he could have worded things differently, but the context made his point pretty clear, IMO.

        2. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

          And you removed the most important bit …

          ” – based on things like familiarity and how established it is in the market”.

          He’s just saying that with electric cars people are acting differently, going for new over old.

          1. Yup says:

            Tesla is very familiar, because it’s been in the news constantly for the past few years, and the Model S is the only established long range EV product on the market.

            Perhaps what he should have said is that people are breaking from their previous brand loyalties, and that would be true.

            1. mr. M says:

              Yes i think too “people are breaking with their former brand” is more correct.

      2. Will Davis says:

        Nowhere does the quote say Tesla isn’t a brand pick. Like most poor arguments he’s putting words in people’s mouths

    2. kdawg says:

      325,000 at least now.

    3. Speculawyer says:

      This is Tesla’s 4th car. This is NOT a new brand at this point. They are actually the most established brand when it comes to pure EVs! He has it completely backwards.

      It was brand that caused Tesla to get 115,000 orders before anyone had even seen the car!

      1. Durkle42 says:

        While they may be the most experienced with EV drivetrains, they are not the most experienced period. Assembly quality, things like air leaking through window seals, seat quality, door issues/handle issues have all been problems for Tesla. These issues don’t, or hardly ever, come out of most of the established auto makers. Now on the flip side, Tesla is pushing the boundaries, they’ve got the most advanced drive systems, some of the most advanced electrical systems (screens etc), fancy falcon wing doors etc. In many ways, you’re trading off reliability for cutting edge performance and technology. If that tradeoff is OK to you, do it! I’m still very much on the fence about ordering a M3, may wait until I can experience it firsthand before ordering, which probably means I’ll get one about when they refresh it sometime in 2020 or 2021… and likely pick something else up before then to tide me over!

        1. Julien says:

          What about airbags issues, entertainment system issues, pedals issues, diesel pollution … And I’m not talking about Tesla there but established automakers out there like GM, Honda, VW etc…
          Most of them are not advertised in the blogs/publications but read any automakers forums and you will see that Tesla isn’t the only one dealing with issues.

      2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        Tesla only started mass producing cars in 2012; only four years ago. I have to agree with Mr. Fisker; it is remarkable that so many are willing to put down “earnest money” on a car made by a company with so little track record.

        Car buyers are usually much more conservative; much more leery of buying something as expensive as an automobile from a company which hasn’t been around long… which, history shows, means it might not be around in a few years.

        Now, that’s not to say the Tesla bashers are right in claiming that Tesla Motors is going to go out of business, and soon. Tesla pretty clearly has a lot of potential for future growth. But people are right to be conservative with their money, and the very large number of Model ≡ reservations is surprising.

    4. Lou says:

      Evil One; I think what he meant to say was that consumers are not following the old pattern of choosing a “TRADITIONAL” car brand(GM, Ford, etc)and then sticking with that for life. I certainly recall that my Dad always bought Chevies, never had Fords. Today’s EV consumer is attracted to the car first, and Tesla right now has the hottest product(on the way). Not sure if I agree with him, but that was my take. If another really good EV comes along, we will look at it, regardless of brand.

    5. Sparkinator says:

      As if there were any other all electric 200 mile cars available. What a stupid comment. I am sure that we will hear the same kind of thing when Tesla comes out with their 300 mile range Pickup. “Oh, what a shocking response, who could have guessed that a non-4-door hatchback EV would ever sell?” I have to wonder if traditional car companies lack the imagination, or the courage to offer a compelling EV other than these little 4-door sedans? Probably they lack both.

  4. CDAVIS says:

    Henrik Fisker Quote: “…It’s clear from (the Model 3 unveiling) that consumers, when it comes to electric cars, they’re looking at maybe newer players that have more experience in new technology and are ‘cooler’ as a brand to be associated with and aren’t from the older car world.”
    ——-

    That’s a correct observation and perhaps will turn out to be the biggest challenge for traditional auto makers on EV cars.

  5. Speculawyer says:

    I don’t want to be rude but the views of spectacular failure are not very useful.

    1. TomArt says:

      I was thinking the same thing, but to me, as a layperson of marketing and statistics, he makes an interesting point.

      But I also agree with some of the above comments that, when you have 100k+ orders for a vehicle nobody has seen, then they have to be making their decisions based on the brand – specifically, the image of the brand and their history of existing products.

      Now, if Fisker is referring to brand loyalty, as “Lou” suggested above, then he may be right – if your preferred brand doesn’t make the car you want (such as a compelling EV like the Model 3), then you will hop brands, where that might not have been a reasonable expectation a mere generation ago (at least in the US).

    2. PNWFFE1 says:

      +1

  6. Bradley Goldman says:

    Asking Fisker who took millions from the tax payers in his ponzi scheme of a car about Tesla, is like asking Donald Trump… well…about anything. They don’t deserve the forum.

    1. Jacked Beanstalk says:

      His company didn’t succeed, that doesn’t make it a “ponzi scheme”. An important facet of capitalism is that some companies fail.

      Would you prefer that when the government offers subsidies to promote new technology they take measures to ensure every company that received a subsidy will never go out of business?

      1. evcarnut says:

        IN THIS CASE ,IT WAS A PONZI SCHEME

        1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          The Fisker Karma was an actual working car that was actually sold by Fisker. Contrariwise, Charles Ponzi was a fraud who was selling something that didn’t exist.

          So let us please not use the label “Ponzi scheme” to mean any startup business that ever failed. In fact, as I understand it, more than 50% of businesses fail in the first year of operation. That does not, repeat not, make all those failures “Ponzi schemes”!

  7. Paul Corsaro says:

    I put down my $1K based on Tesla Model S and Tesla’s specifications.

    All other manufactures with their 50-100 mile range is a joke.

    The Bolt looks like all the other ugly EVs. Their use of low resistant tires is another example of trading a few more miles of range and decreasing safety. Tesla would never do that.

    Tesla’s: look, range, price, super charge, stations and safety is a real EV product.

  8. future-evowner says:

    People want a great looking EV not an econobox like the bolt, a glorified spark ev.

    The Model 3 will be able to really use most of the charging stations available now (with adapter) plus the SC network.

    1. mxs says:

      Really??? That’s why Civics, Corollas etc. are the best selling vehicles in North America in the sort of econo class? Mind to call model 3 econo class gives me a chuckle … maybe econo for the rich.

      It’s the new/cool/geek effect …. people who were not car buffs, now are all of a sudden and proudly telling everyone they put their down payment for model 3.

      Which is fine, to each his own … but to call Bolt ugly, is perhaps your opinion, not shared by many others. It’s not cool, but decent looking and much more practical than the cool model 3.

      Would you mind telling us what are you driving now, and what was the last ICE car you were driving since you dismissed the Bolt so quickly?

      1. future-evowner says:

        Yes, an econo POS.
        Though econo may be incorrect since the fugly bolt will cost more than the Model 3.

  9. Djoni says:

    Something attracts my attention about what he said:
    I love cars, I work on all types of cars, and I still think there’s something unique about jumping into a car, hearing the gear change, feeling the interaction with the mechanics.”

    Hearing gear change might be his problem, because he never heard this one coming.

  10. Murrysville EV says:

    “I guess wrapping the Voltec drivetrain in a sports car body didn’t work as expected.”

    1. future-evowner says:

      The caddy version sucked so much they offloaded it to China to build to imort in the US.

      They’re probably relying on it to fail more so they can claim it’s not worth building anymore.

  11. ffbj says:

    There is something about getting on a horse the smell of the saddle leather going from a canter to a trot, controlling the animal, but that is history as a means of mass transportation, as the ice will be soon.

  12. Goodbyegascar says:

    I love that Fisker’s big flop was called “Karma.”

    Maybe Fisker should market a wine under the label “Sour Grapes.”

  13. Mike Morisseau says:

    Fisker is just being angry that people are now investing in simply the name ELON MUSK. And his radical ideas like the hyperloop and innovations unheard of since Steve Jobs.