Hennessey Considers All-Electric 1,000-HP Venom GT

2 years ago by Mark Kane 10

Hennessey Venom F5

Hennessey Venom F5

Hennessey Venom F5

Hennessey Venom F5

Hennessey is considering an all-electric supercar Venom GT, while at the same time ruling out a hybrid.

John Hennessey said at the recent SEMA show that a 1,000bhp all-electric hypercar is possible and not far in the future.

“We’re considering doing something with electricity. We’ve looked at it and I’ve got friends in that field, I’m just waiting for the batteries to become lighter and have more capacity. But I don’t think that’s far away.”

“Ferrari, Porsche and McLaren have done a great job at proving that hybrid technology works, but I’m not interested in hybrids. I’d only do the Venom with an engine or as a straight electric.”

For now, Hennessey sees the problem in weight north of two tons for decent range, but most of us will agree that it’s just a matter of time when even Hennessey will switch Venom to electric.

The current version of Venom GT uses 7.0-litre twin-turbo GM-sourced V8. It puts out 1,451 hp and has a top speed of 270+mph.

Next generation ICE Venom F5 is to arrive in 2017.

Source Top Gear via ecomento

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10 responses to "Hennessey Considers All-Electric 1,000-HP Venom GT"

  1. Anon says:

    It’s weird that automakers think they can continue to ignore / postpone reacting to stricter emissions regulations.

    Clearly, they need tightened even more, so these companies are working on cleaner drivetrain technology NOW, not later…

  2. mustang_sallad says:

    i think it’s a bit of a stretch to refer to Hennessey as an “automaker”. Have these guys sold more than 1000 vehicles?

  3. Well, it would probably not make sense to have the Electric Slower than the gasser version! However, Today that would likey result in a lot less range, based on cells available!

    While A123 cells could be among the best for power density with their 30C rating, their energy density is about a third of Tesla’s cells, with just 1.1 AH per 18650 cell, where Tesla has 3.1 AH or maybe 3.4 AH per 18650 cell. Luckily, the A123 cell is about 39 grams versus about 45 for those Tesla uses, which helps to keep the cell weight down.

    1. SparkEV says:

      What is Tesla (panasonic?) power density? If it’s 10C while having 3 times more capacity, wouldn’t the power output be the same?

      For the weight, is that weight per cell or weight per kW or weight per kWh? If weight is per cell, wouldn’t Panasonic be better than A123?

      1. protomech says:

        P90DL is limited to about 400 kW for brief periods, so about 4.5C.

        If the battery has 3x the volumetric energy density as A123, then it has about half the volumetric power density.

  4. goodbyegascar says:

    The modern EV drivetrain is a natural choice, especially for super cars.

    The EV revolution is underway. Sparks are gonna fly!

    1. SparkEV says:

      Except for weight due to battery.

  5. Ted Wilson says:

    Please don’t consider. People are not going to invest $ 500,000 for a car like this which can seat only 2 people.

    Think of Cadillac ELR which was priced at $75,000 for a 35 mile range and it flopped miserably.

    Bugatti sold 0 units of their Veyron sport car in USA this year. Hennessey will end up like Bugatti.

  6. Roy LeMeur says:

    It will only be a short matter of time when energy and power density of batteries meets and exceeds the number necessary to leave fuel-burners in the dust in many areas of competition.

    If Hennessey goes electric at the right time, and Bugatti sticks to the ICE model, it is likely Hennessey will be a very successful -electric- hypercar.

    It won’t be long before power/energy density allows electrics to dominate many forms of motorsports.

  7. mr. M says:

    Why not go to 1000kW if you go electric 😉