General Public Stills Seems Clueless When it Comes to Electric Vehicle Charging

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 23

Highly Unlikely That You Sit and Wait for Your EV to Charge

Highly Unlikely That You Sit and Wait for Your EV to Charge

A Courier Post reader from Burlington County, New Jersey submitted the following to the daily newspaper.

Workplace Charging Goes Along Way To Driving Your EV With More Reckless Abandon

Workplace Charging Goes Along Way To Driving Your EV With More Reckless Abandon…These People Aren’t “Waiting”

Charged-Up from Burlington County:

“I see they opened up these charging stations for these all-electric cars. Who has time to sit and wait while your car charges up? It will never take off. It is not going to happen. You need a hybrid combination battery and gas engine. That’s the only way it is going to be feasible. That thing has to be charging as you’re driving. It’s never going to fly. I’m charged up all day long and I’m ticked off about the price of gas.”

Unfortunately, this is still the general perception of plug-in vehicles.  The “general public” comments similar to this all the time and what is shows us is a total lack of understanding.

Do electric vehicle owners sit and wait while the vehicle charges?  Most do not.

We don’t know where else to go with this without going off the deep end with some never-ending rant that proves “Charged-Up” wrong, so we’ll leave it at that and turn it over to you.

Source: Courier Post

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23 responses to "General Public Stills Seems Clueless When it Comes to Electric Vehicle Charging"

  1. David Murray says:

    I have encountered this attitude MANY times. What it stems from is people who are used to the paradigm of the gas station. The are used to taking time out of their schedule to go refuel their car and wait while this happens. For some reason it never occurs to them that most people will be charging at night while they sleep and that the public L2 stations are for convenience more than anything else.

    1. Tom A. says:

      Exactly…they just didn’t think that far. For many of these people, if you would point out that chargers are located where you go do something else (grocery store, restaurant, etc., places you were going to go to ANYWAY), it would clear things up. The rest, well…averages are made up of highs and lows…

  2. Chris says:

    Since driving an EV over 25,000 miles now in a year and a half I’ve noticed having one has actually made my daily life a little less stressful. I look forward to the down time while charging, I take that hour for lunch or sit down to enjoy my coffee instead of gulping it.

  3. Ocean Railroader says:

    What is funny about this is I felt temped to ask Tesla if they could put a supercharging station next to this large popular Susi place in Williamsburg which is half between Richmond and Virginia so that if I ever get one I could stop it plug it in and go into the Susi place and come out 40 minutes later. As for a Nissan Leaf I would do the same with it. Or if they had a level 2 charging station at Bush Gardens Williamsburg then you could drive the EV to the amusement park and come out and it will be ready for you.

  4. Thomas J. Thias says:

    Eric, thanks for brining this out into the open. What I have found is that 99 out of 100 people, when asked do not know that ALL EVs and Plug In cars carge on regular 110V AC Outlets. They think that they must pay for a charging station for their home or office.

    With north of 1.5 Billion 110V AC Outlets in North America, we have been EV Charging Ready for decades!

    TELL THEM.

    Granted, not all found outlets are suitable and some are over taxed and not usable, generally L1 opportunity charging, outside the home or office works great for me.

    Best-

    Thomas J. Thias

    1. Aaron says:

      What’s scarier to me is that number of people that don’t even know that full-electric vehicles exist. Yes, really.

      1. Ocean Railroader says:

        The number of EV myths I have heard are out right crazy.

  5. offib says:

    Ugh… The stupidity is too much! You’d see them all over the internet, YouTube especially. It’s like being thrown back to 2006.

  6. Carl says:

    I educate as often as I can.

    I always tell people that when I charge at work, I park it, plug it in, and go to my desk.
    Then, maybe 2 hours later, when the car is charged, it sends me a text message, and I go move it.

    They are usually amazed that many of the high-tech cars of today, are connected to the internet through cell services.

  7. vdiv says:

    To be perfectly fair I have indeed sat in my car listening to music or reading while waiting for it to charge. That happens rather rarely and strictly by choice.

    But to be fair as well I have sat and waited for my cell phone to charge too. Or waited infront of my computer hypnotized by different color squares moving on the screen while the hard disk drive is getting defragmented. Or stood infront of a laundry machine waiting for my load to finish.

    So I am not necessarily quite normal 😉

  8. Francis L says:

    An electric car is like a dishwasher. A dishwasher takes more time to wash your plates than doing it yourself. But do you sit in front of your dishwasher when it’s working?

    People needs to change theirs habits, but it won’t be easy for everybody. Tell them about L1 at home, L2 at work and L3 on the road.

    1. Vin says:

      Oh that’s a good analogy, I’ll have to remember that!

      I’ve been telling folks that owning an EV is like owning a cell phone, especially an Android… charge it every night and, if needed, when at work. I’m guessing that this Burlington County person doesn’t have a smartphone…

      He implies that he’s driving a hybrid… must have at least half of a brain!

      I must be lucky, everyone I’ve talked to re: my EV ask intelligent questions (usually centered around dealing with range anxiety and/or TCO), and I can see the wheels turning in their after we talk, probably trying to figure out if/how/when they can or should make the change.

  9. Pete D says:

    I dropped my Daughter off last week at ISU in Normal, IL. Plugged my new Volt into a free 240V charger in the parking garage (thank you city of Normal and ISU!), and it was fully charged by the time we moved her into the dorm and had dinner. No waiting, and it saved me a gallon of gas on the ride home!

    1. Glenn Marcucio says:

      I’m convinced that many people park in EV charging station spots because they have no clue as to what the charger actually is. They think it’s some big vacuum cleaner like at the car wash and figure I’ll park here but don’t need to vacuum my car now.

      1. David Murray says:

        I agree with that for the ones that have no signs. But it is sort of hard to excuse when there is clearly a sign that says “electric vehicle charging only” or something to that effect.

  10. Stevie J says:

    Whats alarming is the general public do not have a clue on these charging stations, along with the city and county employees who have charging stations on city streets. Our fire fighters do not have a clue on these units and would not know how to shut one down in the event of an accident or incident. These cities do not have a inspection program to inspect these devices over the course of 6 months or 1 yr and now there are reports of charging stations being vandalized and stolen. If a city tells you they have a safety plan in place they are lying in your face, If a firefighter tells you they have been trained …they are lying……
    People have a false sense of security that nothing can happen to these stations and they can not harm or kill anyone. Just wait…..its a matter of time before something does happen and the city or county gets the snot sued out of them for lack of education and training.
    I have done my research and found one company on the net who actually talks about these safety concerns….atleast they have the balls to take on the industry and tell the truth. If one of my family members gets injured or killed, you will see me own the city and all of the stations…….

    1. Spec says:

      The sky is falling!

    2. James says:

      Well for starters, there’s an app for that… and a widely available .pdf showing the disconnects for EV and PHEV vehicles. Won’t help much but I put a copy of my Fusion’s in the glove box and another in the truck in case somebody goes looking. I’m considering a decal or two to point emergency workers to those locations should I not be able to tell them.

  11. Thomas J. Thias says:

    Steve J,

    Nice try steve j. Where I come from this is called fact free fear mongering! WTH are you babbleing about?

    A 220 AC Outlet? Gawd help us if you have friends over to your home, someone walks by your running cloths dryer in your laundry room and freezes in terror.

    Go Home.

    Best-

    Thomas J. Thias

    1. Stevie J says:

      See thomas its boneheads people like you that will get someone killed….Im not trying to scare anyone nor am i trying to be a fear mongerer……

      I called our local fire department in NY and asked them if they were familiar with these devices. Of course they said NO
      Before you speak do some research about what the industry is even concerned about, I did not just make this up off the top of my head…..Maybe it might just be you that something happens too. I bet your family will be the first one to sue …… it never fails

      Educate yourself before you run your mouth …

  12. Stevie J says:

    I wanted to clarify more on what I said earlier.

    I am a EV owner and I support the EV and EVSE program. Since the purchase of my EV, I have noticed many poor installation on ev charging stations. I have never seen anything on a chargng station such as a “Warning label” “contact in the event of a emergency” or who to call if a charging station was vandalized or struck.
    I come from a background of fire fighters in the family and something I have always looked at was safety. EV safety, EVSE safety , CNG safety, Hybrid safety,etc.. I would like to see more education for our emergency responders on the EVSE side of things and more education on the Level III charging station. Safety experts have expressed their concern for this device of them all. If our emergency responders are not educated on these devices it becomes a serious hazard and then the dummies who say, ” Its not different than a light pole”…..cmon guys, we all know to install a light pole on any city street, there are major steps that one must complete before it even happens…..a charging station requires a permit and thats it……or people can purchase them at Home Depot or Lowes and not pull permit. .there are now reports in florida where people are not even pulling permits…..whos going to know?
    When I first began my research into this problem I found one website that has been talking about these issues for the last couple years and they are well respected in the EVSE Safety world.
    So before you bash me for fear mongering and scare tactics…..do your homework and know what your talking about. Just because you own an EV that doesnt mean you know whats going on across the country and what our fire fighters face on a daily basis. These are real life issues and concerns and I believe this company Greenstar Concepts has done a great job in working with first responders across the country.
    Vandalism has increased and now theft will follow and one drug addicts find out how much copper are in these 18ft cables they will begin to steal them. We need to educate the public on the safety side of this program.
    Best Wishes,
    Steve Johnson, HSR/ Fire 2311

    1. Brian Lathem says:

      Stevie J,

      I agree with you and I found it hard to believe that our fire fighters were not being trained on many safety concerns involving charging stations. I went ahead and done my own research and called several fire departments in my city and you were right, they are concerned about the safety of the general public and their firefighters. They are also concerned about the EV and Hybrid vehicles also, the NFPA received a $4.4 Million dollar grant to train our emergency responders on electric vehicles and they only conpleted a very low amount before the funding was depleted. Something does not sit right with me about this and I call BS when I hear they used up the funding.
      After I did a litte more probing and made some calls to our city departments, I was in hella shock to hear that safety was not a factor, nor were they prepared on any catastrophic events or accidents that may happen. They did not have a plan in place or never thought a plan was needed. An inspection program was not available for these devices and they did not have the personel or man power to create a inspection program.

      So needless to say, Stevie, you are very right and your concerns are valid. It did not take me no time to find out this information and if people would take the time to look into this matter maybe we would be in a better position. Sooner or later an accident will occur and the negative press will run rampant.
      Kudos to you Stevie

      Brian Lathem