Complete In-Car Video From Faraday Future FF91 At Pikes Peak – Video

3 months ago by Eric Loveday 13

We reported on Faraday Future’s “production” electric vehicle record at Pikes Peak when it happened last weekend, but now there’s some nifty in-car footage of the entire run for your viewing pleasure.

Of note:

 “The FF 91, driven by FF Principal Engineer Robin Shute, finished with a time of 11:25:083, faster than the standing production-designed EV record by more than 20 seconds.”

The time would certainly have been a bit quicker (~30 seconds) were it not more a little hiccup along the route that forced the driver to reboot the entire car. Watch for it in the video at the 10-minute, 45-second mark.

Overall race winner at Pike Peak this year was Romain Dumas with a time of 9:05.332 in a revised version of the Norma MXX RD Limited.

In-Car Video From FF91 At Pikes Peak

Editor’s Note:  We should mention that the “production” class record seemingly has a fairly wide definition, as obviously the FF 91 is not yet in production, and the previous mark was set by a modified Tesla Model S (800 lbs was removed, and was “ice” cooled) – watch the Tesla’s run from last year here.  The mark before the Tesla was set by a Honda Fit EV in 12 minutes 55.591 second

Press release from Faraday Future:

Faraday Future Bests Pikes Peak Production EV Time by More Than 20 Seconds

Los Angeles, 26 June 2017 – Faraday Future successfully tested the limits of FF 91 (“nine one”) in its first attempt to challenge the 4,720-foot ascent of the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. The FF 91, driven by FF Principal Engineer Robin Shute, finished with a time of 11:25:083, faster than the standing production-designed EV record by more than 20 seconds.

The public engineering endeavor is dedicated to the development of FF 91’s propulsion system and high speed handling, with the powertrain and battery packs stressed to their limits.

“Our real-world testing program is designed to find problems that we would never find in a controlled environment.,” said Pete Savagian, Vice President of Powertrain & Battery Systems. “We’re proud of our time, but this is about the quality of our propulsion system more than just a one-time race. Our focus was on repeatability — to reach the peak without overheating the vehicle, and to be able to do so again and again.”

Running in the Pikes Peak Challenge – Exhibition Class, Faraday Future tested an FF 91 Beta development vehicle using production representative hardware, software, and aerodynamic modifications required to run the 12.42-mile track up the mountain.

“My goal was to push the FF 91 beyond what we thought she could do,” said Shute. “We were able to identify key battery pack relay and system seal issues that will directly result in improvements in the production process. That’s what makes this a successful event for Faraday Future.”

The testing effort at Pikes Peak plays part in Faraday Future’s “Testing the FF 91” video series which will chronicle the detailed testing efforts made by Faraday Future’s engineers to bring a new species of electric mobility to the market and push the limits of FF’s technology in a variety of demanding environments. A full Pikes Peak account will be produced in the coming weeks.

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13 responses to "Complete In-Car Video From Faraday Future FF91 At Pikes Peak – Video"

  1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    “…faster than the standing production-designed EV record by more than 20 seconds.”

    FF’s pretense that its stripped-down prototype is a “production-designed EV” clearly didn’t fool race officials, since FF’s prototype wasn’t allowed to compete as a production car or even a “production prototype” (or pre-production) car.

    Once again, Faraday Failure Future demonstrates that there is no reason to believe anything they claim.

    1. floydboy says:

      I guess the idea was to have MORE of everything than Tesla. Well, more of everything EXCEPT production!

      1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        Of all wannabe auto makers, FF certainly wins in the category of “most hype”, and quite possibly in “biggest vaporware claims” too. Otherwise… not so much.

      2. Timmy says:

        It’s got more length, width, height and weight (by 1000 lbs or more). i.e., it’s a ridiculous BEAST.

    2. DL says:

      Production class requires the vehicle to have a 17 digit VIN number.

  2. John M says:

    What’s the annoying alarm sound during the whole video, was this car stolen?

    1. alohart says:

      Because EV’s are so quiet and traveling so fast, people along the course might not hear them approaching which could be dangerous, so EV’s are required to produce a warning sound.

  3. SimonMTL says:

    At 10m48s the car had a failure, and the driver lost about 20 seconds trying to start the car again.

    Could’ve gotten a much better time.

  4. Seth says:

    Kind of amazed how fast something so large and heavy can be hustled up a mountain. The driving dynamics for something that doesn’t have race suspension is quite remarkable.

  5. Jason says:

    It would be interesting to know how much energy is used for this run. Then size the battery pack for that amount of energy use. The vehicle would be significantly light, I would think, and thus more agile around all these corners. Could be an interesting development.

    1. Timmy says:

      As will a pre-programmed/autonomous run. Look for it in a year or two.

  6. jim stack says:

    They missed the best part. As the Electrics go back down the hill they use REGEN and get part of their charge back. How could they not include that part?

  7. Will Davis says:

    “The time would certainly have been a bit quicker (~30 seconds) were it not more a little hiccup along the route that forced the driver to reboot the entire car. Watch for it in the video at the 10-minute, 45-second mark.”

    In racing, 30 seconds isn’t “a little quicker”. It’s IMMENSELY, GROUND BREAKINGLY quicker.

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