Forbes Presents 3 Reasons to Love Electric Vehicles; Saving the World Isn’t One of Them

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 20

Yes...This Electric is Surely Fun!!!

Yes…This Electric is Surely Fun!!!

We absolutely love it when the mainstream media gets wind of what’s been discussed here for ages.

None of the 3 reasons listed below will shock any of us, but still to see them appear in Forbes means that we’re having an impact on the public at large.

As Forbes tries to say, saving the world doesn’t even have to be on your list of priorities when purchasing an electric vehicle.  In fact, there are at least 3 other reasons that might sway your decision even more.

And here they are, as presented by Forbes:

NYC is Often Stinky...So Says Its Residents

NYC is Often Stinky…So Says Its Residents

  • “People are moving to cities and cities stink. Whenever I get a whiff of the nasty blue cloud coming from the tailpipe of a diesel truck I think, “Ah, Paris.” I lived in Paris briefly once and gas has always been expensive over there so everybody drives diesels that stink. Or they drive motos, scooters, or motorcycles that stink even worse. By 2050, 7 out of 10 people will live in urban areas. Urban transportation already accounts for 40% of CO2 emissions and 70% of emissions of other road-transportation pollutants. Nothing comes out of an electric vehicle tailpipe; indeed, tailpipes are purely ornamental. Regardless of whether you care about saving the rest of the earth or not, at some point people are going to want to remember Paris for the Louvre rather than for the stinky air.”
  • “Electric vehicles are more fun. After driving electric vehicles for a few months, participants in a recent SAP research pilot praised the electric vehicles’ engines for their lack of noise and instant acceleration power. Almost half of the pilot participants expressed interest in purchasing an electric car in the next five years if electric vehicle prices dropped, and approximately one fourth of the pilot drivers would consider buying an electric vehicle in the next two years even with prices at their current levels.”
  • “Electric vehicles could let us stick it to the man. Ever want to thumb your nose at the power company? Or if you’re more mature than me, maybe you’d settle for simply saving money on your bill? Researchers are experimenting with two-way batteries that would let electric vehicle owners release stored energy back to the grid when power companies most need it (and are most willing to pay for it). As electric vehicles become more popular, they could also become useful tools for utilities trying to manage demand from the grid. Most things that demand energy – everything from office buildings to refrigerators – are either on or off; they demand a full dose of energy or none at all. Electric vehicle batteries are much less demanding: they can charge quickly or slowly.”

More fun!!!  That one should be highlighted.  As green-inclined automotive enthusiasts, fun-to-drive is still in our blood.  If it ain’t fun, don’t buy it.  There’s a fun factor associated with almost every electric vehicle out there.  The same cannot be said of all those ICErs.

Electric vehicles are more fun…spread the word.

Source: Forbes

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20 responses to "Forbes Presents 3 Reasons to Love Electric Vehicles; Saving the World Isn’t One of Them"

  1. Rick Danger says:

    Number 3 should be “stick it to the oil companies.”
    Unless you can put up solar panels, with an EV, you’re more dependent on the power company than ever.

    1. kdawg says:

      Yeah, I laughed at that one. Apparently “the Man” is the electric company to Forbes. To me big oil is The Man. And the oil sheikhs they get it from aren’t high on my list either.

      1. Ocean Railroader says:

        The Man is the local gas station and I have a local gas station that I hate and rather then blow it up I would find it much more entertaining to watch the Nissan Leafs and Teslas start creeping in around it and strangle it to death.

    2. Chris says:

      Most utilities are considered public and as such cannot raise prices without some kind of justification to a regulatory body. Not perfect but somewhat better then liquid fuels currently available.

      1. pjwood says:

        But doesn’t Exxon competing with Mobil stations mean even cheaper energy prices? Oh, wait…

        Forbes, the once “Capitalist Tool” it was, could’ve made one of the three “Capitalism”, because when you buy an EV you let energy fuels compete.

  2. kdawg says:

    “We absolutely love it when the mainstream media gets wind of what’s been discussed here for ages.”
    ————–

    What is is they say? You need to tell someone something 3 times before they get it. Maybe they are finally getting it.

  3. scott moore says:

    Release power back to the grid? That may actually be the stupidest idea I have heard all year (against considerable competition).

    1. Aaron says:

      This would be for super-high power draw times. This would help prevent the need for rolling blackouts.

      In Japan, the LEAF and i-MiEV both have adapters that allow CHAdeMO-equipped vehicles to power their homes in the case of a power failure. That makes more sense to me.

      1. scott moore says:

        Yes, and use for portable power makes sense.

        Paying $35,000 to $70,000 for a large battery to sell the power companies power back to them at a discount = mass stupidity (IMHO).

        1. Dan Hue says:

          Think about it another way… Granted, you would not buy a large battery for the purpose of providing storage to the power company, but if(for whatever reason) you happen to own a large battery, why not get some money out of it while you don’t need it? Fill it up when it’s cheap and sell the power back when it’s expensive. Does not strike me as stupid.

          1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

            Unfortunately, since it’s in a car that could be anywhere at times of peak demand, including being driven or parked at work and not at home connected to a high-powered socket V2G just doesn’t really work that well. Night-time V2G on the other hand, could work given that people program their cars to be charged by a given time rather than from a given time.

            Besides, if there are lots of BEVs, it would imply cheap batteries, which the utility have built to their own spec and not according to the spec of a car manufacturer whose warranty will likely preclude use for V2G, other than in emergencies.

    2. Ocean Railroader says:

      Based off of us owning this giant six kilowatt space heater that has a 220 volt 30 amp feed to it and when we turn it on it really can drink down the power. I think this is what having hundreds of thousands of EV’s will really do in that after all they need a lot of power to drive around and something like a EV will take in far more power then it could ever sell back to the grid in that it would be like taking gas out of your gas tank and selling it back to the gas station.

      The good news out of all of this is that EV’s will help bring a need for new upgrades to power poles in the forms of extra rows of cross arms and wires and employment for tens of thousands of new insulators and transformers along with hundreds of miles of new local distribution circuits. And tons of jobs for the local Linemen.

    3. Spec says:

      Well most of these articles get the concept wrong. In most cases it is not about supplying substantial power to the grid, it is about frequency regulation. Sometimes if you add a little power to the grid at the right place it will save them from having to crank up big generation system. They’ll pay a good premium if you have the power at the right time and the right place and they won’t need huge amounts.

  4. MDEV says:

    Stick to the politicians

  5. Aaron says:

    “Nothing comes out of an electric vehicle tailpipe; indeed, tailpipes are purely ornamental.”

    Who the crap puts an “ornamental” exhaust pipe on their car? I mean, yes, there was that one joke marketing campaign with Mitsubishi in Canada, but that was a JOKE! C’mon Forbes. No 100% electric car has a tailpipe.

    1. David Stone says:

      There is a small possibility that he knows what he is writing about and is refering to the volt and how it is driven.

      Some people use so little gas that the ice part is rarely used.
      Since the tailpipe is visible, it could be described exaggeratingly as ornamental.

  6. Spec says:

    There is this weird psychology of some people wherein they just can’t be seen doing anything that might actually be viewed as less harmful to the environment.

    1. Brian says:

      Yeah, what’s up with that? You don’t have to be some hard-core left-wing extremist to care about the earth on which we live.

      1. David Stone says:

        I agree completely with both of you.

        It would be enough to use and avoid wasting resources.

  7. Operating costs for EV’s is *much lower* 2-4¢ / mile for energy vs 7-16¢ / mile PLUS regular scheduled maintenance is about 3.5¢ / mile at typical dealer prices. This adds up quickly, and driving an EV will save $8-20K every 100K miles you drive.

    I think when you can put a solar PV system on your roof, you get a Perfect Match. Your costs drop significantly lower even that when you pay for all your electricity – and you can really “stick it to the man”.

    All the money you spend on electricity *stays* in your local economy. Instead of contributing to the $1 Billion PER DAY that the US exports out of our economy to buy foreign oil, you will be boosting your local economy instead. Add to this the non-trivial military efforts and foreign policy gets a little tortured – all to try and protect our supply of oil.

    Neil