European Market For Plug-In Electric Cars Doubled In 2015 to 186,000

6 months ago by Mark Kane 14

Plug-in electric car registrations in Europe in Q4 2015 (source: ACEA)

Plug-in electric car registrations in Europe in Q4 2015 (source: ACEA)

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - 30,873 sold in 2015 in Europe

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV – 30,873 sold in 2015 in Europe

*According to registration data released by the ACEA, the European plug-in electric car market doubled in 2015 to a record high of 186,170 (compared to 92,455 in 2014). And that’s only new passenger cars, without at least several thousand commercial EVs.

The total result concerns 22 countries in the European Union and Norway with Switzerlands (EFTA). In the fourth quarter, sales nearly hit 70,000, which was more than conventional hybrids (full hybrids + mild hybrids)!

Total hybrid registrations stood at 234,170 in 2015, which means that in 2016 even relatively moderate growth could enable plug-ins to overtake hybrids.

“In the fourth quarter of 2015, total alternative fuel vehicle registrations in the EU continued the positive momentum (+21.1%), totalling 164,718 units. Of these, electric vehicle (EV) registrations showed a substantial increase (+160.5%), more than doubling. EV registrations rose from 22,531 units in Q4 2014 to 58,689 units in Q4 2015. Demand for new hybrid vehicles (HEV) also grew significantly (+28.8%), reaching 60,911 units. On the other hand, new registrations of cars powered by propane or natural gas showed a double-digit dip (-31.8%) similarly to the previous quarter, totalling 45,118 – more than 20,000 units less than in Q4 2014.

Among the EU’s major markets, the Netherlands saw the largest increase of AFVs registered over the last quarter (+258.1%), followed by France (+43.7%), Germany (+27.8%) and the UK (+17.4%). Growth in these countries was fully driven by electric and hybrid electric car markets, especially in the Netherlands where the largest number of new electric cars was totalled. Italy performed less well compared to Q4 2014 (-23.6%), mainly due to the decline observed in the gas-fuelled car registrations, which represent more than 80% of total AFVs.

In 2015, more than half a million AFVs were registered in the EU, up 20% compared to 2014. This represents 4.2% of total passenger car registrations. The uplift was fully sustained by the electric (+108.8%) and hybrid electric (+23.1%) markets, while the other alternative fuels declined (-8.4%).”

ACEA put in the Electric Vehicle category various types of drivetrains from all-electric, to plug-in hybrids and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (those are rare).

Netherlands (in part due to the rush to avoid higher taxes of plug-in hybrids) took #1 with 43,441! That’s more than Norway (33,721). Top 5 is closed out by three countries – UK (28,715), Germany (23,481) and France (22,867).

Those five countries hold nearly 82% (152,225) of the plug-in passenger car registrations in Europe.

Plug-in electric car registrations in Europe in 2015 (source: ACEA)

Plug-in electric car registrations in Europe in 2015 (source: ACEA)

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14 responses to "European Market For Plug-In Electric Cars Doubled In 2015 to 186,000"

  1. RexxSee says:

    So why didn’t the market soar here? Because this is the land where BIG OIL rules…
    The sales curve should go exponential by now, but anti-EV propaganda, intense lobbying, weak CO² rules and bad will from car companies did have their nasty effect.

    1. Skryll says:

      The land of the free lol

    2. Jernej says:

      Europe has very high gasoline/diesel taxes. Decline in price of oil barrel does not translate into significant gasoline price decrease.

      1. Jernej says:

        In short, it’s got nothing to do with “big oil”, “anti ev propaganda” etc. It’s related to economics and tax subsidies (somebody already mentioned NL Q4 huge sales numbers due to tax expiry).

        1. RexxSee says:

          In short, its the ongoing pressures from Big Oil on politics, rules and laws, along with the millions they spend each year for elaborate P.R. (conditioning) campaigns to make us believe that we NEED energy (their hydrocarbon S**t that is). Add the compliance only and extinguishing guidelines followed by the automobile cartel (Big Oils, right hand) And it has ALL to do with Big Oil and the unbounded destructive powers of corporations on this side of the ocean.

          1. Jernej says:

            It seems you are angry and it clouds your judgment. There is no “big oil” in Germany and EV sales are very poor. Why? Low subsidies.

            1. RexxSee says:

              It seems that you have to rely on personal attacks to make your point.

            2. RexxSee says:

              Jernej : “There is no “big oil” in Germany”

              Lol! Big Oil is every where on this planet, but his stronghold is here.

              http://www.conservation.org/nature-is-speaking/Pages/Harrison-Ford-Is-the-Ocean.aspx

      2. RexxSee says:

        Why don’t we have such taxes yet?!? We’re all aware of the unprecedented destruction induced by the hydrocarbons burning on our health, the living creatures and the climate.
        Where lies the real power?

  2. jmac says:

    The following cars are AWOL from the U.S.A

    Outlander Phev – 31,340
    Renault Zoe – 18,670
    VW Golf GTE – 17,282
    VW Passat GTE – 4,823
    Ren.Kangoo van – 4,328
    e-NV200 van – 3,049
    VW e-UP – 2,769
    Twizy – 1,917
    Boll. Blue Car – 1,166
    ————————
    Total – 85,344

    That’s 85,344 vehicles that are MIAs, potential EV sales missing in action. Some models would of course do better in the States than others.

    1. R.S says:

      But there is no Volt in the EU wich should be a 20k+ car in Europe, too.

  3. miggy says:

    At this rate of increase they should be about 300,000 for the 2016 year.

  4. NL says:

    As far as I know the huge amount of plug-in hybrids sold in the Netherlands during Q4 is because the huge tax incentives for company car drivers was not carried on into 2016. The numbers for Q4 seem a bit inflated in that regard but then again more and more vehicles become available so that might keep demand up across Europe.