Electric Cars Married To Solar Energy Is The Key To Curb Fossil Fuel Growth

4 months ago by EVANNEX 15

Model 3 being charged by Tesla's solar roof (Image: Tesla)

Model 3 being charged by Tesla’s solar roof (Image: Tesla)

TESLA LIFESTYLE: ELECTRIC CARS AND SOLAR POISED TO HALT FOSSIL FUEL GROWTH BY 2020

In 2006, Tesla Motors visionary Elon Musk boldly wrote in his Master Plan: “the overarching purpose of Tesla Motors (and the reason I am funding the company) is to help expedite the move from a mine-and-burn hydrocarbon economy towards a solar electric economy.” In addition to Tesla, Musk was also CEO of America’s largest solar provider, SolarCity. Fast forward a decade later and in Musk’s Master Plan Part Deux, he wrote that, “We can’t do this well if Tesla and SolarCity are different companies, which is why we need to combine… the time has come to bring them together.”

*This article comes to us courtesy of Evannex (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Matt Pressman.

As SolarCity and Tesla came together last fall, Matt Roberts, executive director of the Energy Storage Association, explained Musk’s rationale for the merger:

“There’s a clear business case here: Musk says he can expand the market for solar panels by offering them to people who are already considering buying an electric car, and vice versa… In other words, Tesla wants to offer the whole fossil fuel-free frittata.”

Could this Tesla Lifestyle — the alliance of electric cars and solar — actually have a real impact on the fossil fuel juggernaut?

Tesla “Solar Roof” House powering an upcoming Tesla Model 2

Apparently so. This week, the Guardian* reported that the, “falling costs of electric vehicles and solar panels could halt worldwide growth in demand for oil and coal by 2020, a new report has suggested. A scenario that takes into account the latest cost reduction projections for the green technologies, and countries’ pledges to cut emissions, finds that solar power and electric vehicles are ‘gamechangers’ that could leave fossil fuels stranded. Polluting fuels could lose 10% of market share to solar power and clean cars within a decade, the report by the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London and the Carbon Tracker Initiative found.”

Furthermore, it’s reported that, “The cost of solar has fallen 85% in seven years, and the report finds panels could supply 23% of global power generation by 2040 and 29% by 2050, entirely phasing coal out and leaving natural gas with just a 1% share. By 2035, electric vehicles could make up 35% of the road transport market, and two-thirds by 2050, when it could displace 25m barrels of oil per day.” If companies like Tesla continue to innovate at light speed, it could mean that these, “scenarios [might] look conservative in five years’ time.”

Some in the fossil fuel business have taken notice. Electrek reports that Shell Oil’s business director John Abbott announced, “We have a number of countries where we’re looking at having [electric vehicle] battery charging facilities” starting in Britain and the Netherlands. Russia has actually made it a law that gas stations need to offer electric vehicle charging. Recently, CleanTechnica reported that, “The France-based oil company Total will be adding [a planned 300] electric vehicle charging stations to its extant petrol/gasoline station network in France.” Looks like the energy transformation — at least the beginning — has already begun.

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*Source: The Guardian

*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX, Check out the site here.

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17 responses to "Electric Cars Married To Solar Energy Is The Key To Curb Fossil Fuel Growth"

  1. ffbj says:

    If they get divorced who gets the amps?

  2. Mister G says:

    Fossil fuel industry is not gonna go without a fight…join the resistance and drive an EV today.

  3. Ramon Cardona says:

    This combo is a reality in thousands & thousands of homes and businesses in the US and other nations. I am one happy homeowner with both. An array of 24 solar panels generate 6,800 k/W per year for home an electric car use.

    1. EndResult says:

      6800 k/W – what is that? Do you really have a system?

      1. JIMJFOX says:

        Should it read 6800 kW-hr?

  4. Bill Howland says:

    “could Shell be a Tesla Destination?”

    In Canada, Petro Canada already is -with many wallboxes installed across the country. They consider themselves ‘Canada’s Gas Station’ with 1500 retail and wholesale locations.

  5. Bill Howland says:

    The thing about these statements is – people in general will look at these 2-3 million dollar homes and think electric cars are just more play toys for the rich..

    Why not make something for the rest of us?

    1. EV4life says:

      Sorry Bill, thats how it works. The first color TVs where a rich plaything, along with first VCR, first DVD, first digital camera etc etc etc.
      All the technical advances arrive first to those that can afford it, so that the rest of us can get a chance in the future.
      Expecting it to be otherwise is pointless.

      1. Hart Ed says:

        Yep….and air travel, computers, cars, appliances, tractors….you name it…followed the same path. The early adopters make it possible for the rest of us, in time.

        1. Bill Howland says:

          That’s not necessarily ‘how it works’. I’m of meager means and I’ve had 4 ev’s to date.

          1. JIMJFOX says:

            “Meager” is a relative term, Bill!

            1. Bill Howland says:

              I get high value for my EV Dollar. Just negotiated with a third dealership for a new BOLT. First dealer changed our agreement slightly so I demanded my $5000 deposit back, which I got.

              This 3rd dealership admitted they were selling me the BOLT ev slightly below cost. They hope to make it up on Bonuses later from GM, and there are also other intangibles in their favor. But put it this way, the deal was roughly $600 better in the absolute, and, I didn’t get a single option I didn’t want (strictly a coincidence the dealership ordered the car precisely the way I wanted it – $400 metalic paint, and heated seats/steering wheel – no other options).

              The seats are uncanny – I thought that I would hate them. But after sitting in them for 40 minutes on the drive home, they actually got more comfortable, and, the cloth seating ‘feels’ more pleasant than the leather seated BOLT at the auto show.

              Its funny that GM changes the controls around so much. Even with my past volts and current ELR, I have no clue how to operate any controls in the dark.. I assume I’ll learn how to do simple things tomorrow in the daylight.

  6. Hart Ed says:

    I truly believe that those who have electric vehicle today have made a major investment to get the ball rolling…and I think they have the right to claim that since they are completing the journey for renewable energy, then ALL of the power for EVs comes from renewables. Hey…those electrons have to go somewhere!

  7. Brock Nanson says:

    I truly believe that the EV adoption rate will go sky high in the next few years. The Model 3 will lead that transition and before long it will no longer be socially-acceptable to drive an ICE. Keeping up with the Joneses etc…

    And solar panels will do the same (or the solar roofing tiles Tesla is planning to sell soon). Even in Canada, I can generate 30,000 km of Model S driving on an annual basis with 20 panels.

    There is a cost to being an early adopter, but I don’t know anyone who complains about that. Changing someones mind is priceless. A Mastercard commercial in there somewhere perhaps…? 😉

  8. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

    Affordable renewable generation is no longer a problem. But affordable _dispatchable_ renewable generation still is.

    So, hope for cheap electricity storage in lithium ion and other batteries, because that’s what’s needed to eliminate coal power and peaking natural gas. (The USA’s cheap, fracked natural gas will make CCGT hard to beat outside areas with outstanding renewable resources.)

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