Diesel Car Selects Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV As 2014 “Best Alternative Fuel Vehicle”

3 years ago by Mark Kane 27

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Mitsubishi Motors in the UK happily announced that the Outlander PHEV was awarded Diesel Car’sBest Alternative Fuel Vehicle’ for 2014.

“Mitsubishi Motors’ new and exciting Outlander PHEV wowed the judges, impressed them most thanks to its advance plug-in hybrid technology, practicality and its affordable purchase price [starting at £28,249 (post plug-in car grant)].”

Diesel Car’s road test team, after evaluating more than 200 models, decided that the Japanese PHEV is ahead of:

  • the Vauxhall Ampera in the petrol hybrid category,
  • the BMW i3 from the electric car category,
  • and Mercedes E-Class from the diesel hybrid category.

Ian Robertston, Editor of Diesel Car, stated:

The Outlander PHEV is one of the most significant cars of 2014 thanks to its plug-in hybrid technology. There’s generous space for five people, including their luggage, and best of all, it costs the same as the regular diesel Outlander to buy.”

Lance Bradley, Managing Director of Mitsubishi Motors UK responded:

“The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is very different to other hybrids in the market and we are delighted that it has won an award by such a well-respected publication such as Diesel Car, just weeks after its UK launch.”

“Having one of the first plug-in hybrids in the UK market that boasts 4×4 capability with an EV range of 32.5 miles and emissions as low as 44 g/km puts Mitsubishi at the forefront of a new era in the automotive industry.”

Tags: ,

27 responses to "Diesel Car Selects Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV As 2014 “Best Alternative Fuel Vehicle”"

  1. MDEV says:

    Why aren’t they selling this car in US?

    1. Big Solar says:

      Is it 2016 now that they will sell them here?

      1. DaveMart says:

        Its 2016 Model year, and so hopefully will make it to the States late 2015.

      2. liberty says:

        Yes, not until the end of next year. They could sell the current car in most of the country, but California’s carb has regulations against the battery management system. The 2016 model will be CARb compliant, but HOV stickers in california likely will be gone by then for PHEVs and the tesla X will be higher end competition. I expect it will expand the market a little, but the outlander phev won’t be close to the number 2 it is in japan.

        1. DaveMart says:

          No one really cross shops a car and one twice its price.

          1. JRMW says:

            Dave:
            In general I agree with you, except the BEV and PHEV markets are so limited that it does force odd cross shopping.

            There are many upper middle class and affluent people who do not want to spend $80k-$100k+ on a car. I’m one of them. I can’t even imagine wasting so much money on a car. The most expensive car I’ve ever bought is a 3 year old Lexus Rh330 AWD. Prior to that a 3 year old used AWD Passat and a Toyota Tercel.

            But now I really really want a BEV all wheel drive car or SUV. And only Tesla is on the record as making one. So I’m looking and am still considering reserving one.

            the Outlander PHEV is nothing like Tesla X. There will be MAJOR sacrifices (especially E-range…urgh). BUT if I can get one for $45k to $50k then I’d salivate to sacrifice performance and luxury to save $50k-75k off the price of the X.

            There’s just no other game in town (for an AWD car, CUV or SUV). The BMW X5 PHEV and the Volvo X90 PHEV aren’t here yet, and will both have Tesla pricing (which will be a disaster for BMW/Volvo IMO).

            We need Nissan to make an AWD Qashquai, GM to make an AWD Volt CUV/SUV, and Ford to make an AWD Escape. Once those cars are out you won’t get people cross shopping cars that are double the price.

            1. Bonaire says:

              You do realize that the MX is sometimes considered too much car for some buyers. Same for MS. Same for when I didn’t buy a BMW 740iL back 10 years ago and instead bought something for $21K for myself. People really don’t need to buy or spend $70-100K for a car to be happy. The idea of buying a new expensive car to some, including rich people, is apparently a financial choice they choose to avoid. How did rich people get rich? By not spending their money. There is a book called “the millionaire next door.” good topics within.

              1. JRMW says:

                Not sure if your response to me, but I totally understand.

                As I said:
                “There are many upper middle class and affluent people who do not want to spend $80k-$100k+ on a car. I’m one of them. I can’t even imagine wasting so much money on a car.”

                The problem is that there are only 2 AWD options in the BEV and PHEV space, both of which are SEVERELY delayed… the Tesla X or the Outlander. That’s it.

                The only others that anybody even whispers about are the BMW X5 and Volvo XC90, both with nosebleed prices. *(and both will fail as they’re competing with Tesla X)

                Thus if you want AWD you gotta pony up $???,??? for the Tesla X and hope you get it next year or wait for Mitsubishi to get off their bums and sell the Outlander so you can pay $??,???, where the $??,??? is probably $20-50k cheaper than the $???,??? Tesla.

                We have enough teeny tiny FWD and RWD city runners in the PHEV and BEV space, especially since many of them perform about the same as the last set. Get some AWD options.

                And sell them in the snow zone
                I promise you they’ll sell like hotcakes.

                1. See Through says:

                  I think Porsche Cayman PHEV is already out there. Audi might also have a PHEV by 2015.
                  And if Subaru comes up with a BEV/PHEV, it will definitely be all wheel drive.

                  1. Josh says:

                    That will be the first plug-in AWD SUV on the market, but I think it is still a couple months away from being at the dealer in the US.

            2. DaveMart says:

              Yep, it did cross my mind that there could be a bit of one way cross shopping from people who could afford a Model X but would go for something cheaper if it did the job.

              Its for sure that for most though the budget stretches to and Outlander which is slap bang in the middle of new car prices, but not to the X, so it will be one way traffic.

              I was too lazy to type it out though, so thanks for doing that! 😉

            3. DaveMart says:

              I think you will also have another choice in the US late next year or early the following year, the Nissan Rogue PHEV.

              They are developing it as the Qashqai in the UK, but it makes sense for Nissan to go for that super hot selling segment in the US too, and they have capacity there to produce it, I believe.

              The more Outlander PHEVs Mitsubishi sells, the more Nissan is going to want the Rogue PHEV out.

              They have kept pretty quiet about it, but it is a done deal IMO:
              http://www.whatcar.com/car-news/nissan-qashqai-plug-in-hybrid-confirmed/1211420

          2. liberty says:

            Sure if there is a choice, but…

            Some may have bought the outlander phev if it was available sooner, but really wanted the model X.

            Some may have bought the outlander phev, but will choose the gen II volt. The delay definitely hurts outlander sales, and gne II volts and tesla MOdel S’s are not available in Japan 😉

    2. DaveMart says:

      They can’t make enough batteries, and so are going to release it in the new updated body in the US.

      I guess that they may also want to increase the accelerations a bit for the US market.

      1. Dr. Kenneth Noisewater says:

        Hopefully they’ll update the powertrain a bit as well, some more battery and more power, along with 30+A charging.

    3. Spec9 says:

      My theory is that they know they have a hit and so they are carefully refining it and debugging it before they finally launch it in the all-important USA market. They’ve already had a few problems with it and they’ve worked on fixing those. So it should be in good shape when it ships here.

      1. See Through says:

        There is also another theory I have. In Europe, the EV rebates are based on total EV cars sold, or end of tax year (Holland 2013). Mitsubishi is trying to capture all those rebates before they expire.

        In US, the big $7500 IRS tax credit is per manufacturer. So, Mitsubishi is in no big rush. If it arrives in US in 2019 , it still gets that rebate when some of its competitiors, like Nissan and G, may no longer get the same rebate.
        Of course, if it could produce more, it would ship some to US. But at this point, with the EV frenzy in UK and Norway, we don’t expect to see it in US before Fall 2015.

    4. Miggy says:

      Good link to what others are saying about the Outlander:
      http://www.mmnz.co.nz/plug-in-hybrid/reviews/

  2. JRMW says:

    If Mitsubishi would get off their bums and announce a release date to the US I would be customer #1.

    This is surprising (to me), because for the most part I don’t want a PHEV, I want a BEV. But the more I’ve researched, the more I’ve realized that AWD is a necessity for me.

    I’ve said this for a while, but the company that can get a relatively affordable all-wheel-drive SUV that is BEV or Range extended will make a killing, especially if it’s released in the snow zone.

    The Outlander PHEV is almost everything my family wants. if it were 60-100 mile electric range it would be exactly what my family wants. (I personally want an AWD BEV, but my family wants an AWD PHEV)

    I think the car manufacturers made a tactical error in only offering RWD and FWD options, and NO AWD options. (the RAV4 that Toyota refused to sell doesn’t count)

    Early adopters are willing to sacrifice. Thus people drive LEAFs without heat in winter! But there really is no reason why we need to sacrifice AWD.

    1. Josh says:

      Agreed, I would have bought an outlander PHEV for my wife this summer if it had been on the market. Her daily commute is under 20 miles so it would have been a perfect fit.

      1. Miggy says:

        Hi FangQ, just in case your wife wants to take a short cut over cross-country: see this post on InsideEVs, http://insideevs.com/mitsubishi-outlander-phev-places-first-asia-cross-country-rally-2014/

    2. FangQ says:

      then, I will be customer#2 when it hits the US market. I’ve spent a lot of hours researching, looking for my second car upgrade (got a Volt in June), this has been be the best option (balance between cost & performance) so far.

      It would be nice to have better AER (40 miles+ would be great), 7-seat option and improved styling.

    3. Not sure why you think AWD is necessary. I’ve driven both FWD and RWD vehicles in snowy conditions my whole life, and with just a little care and good tires, have had no serious problems (the little RWD iMiev with tiny tires, did quite well in this past Pennsylvania winter with lots of snow). Besides, you already have all wheel braking, which in my mind is much more important than accelerating.

      Anyway, you’re not alone in thinking AWD is a required feature, so I agree with your assessment that any manufacturer who can deliver a SUV form in a PHEV or BEV format within a reasonable price will do well. If it can meet expectations.

      But expectations are high (most people can’t grasp, if someone like me mentions it to them ;), or don’t care about the 500 hours of human labor equivalent in one gallon of gasoline). To reproduce the kind of range and performance of an ICE with less energy dense batteries in a big un-aerodynmic vehicle, with AWD, is daunting. I think even the Model X will struggle to meet range and performance measures of the Model S – while not being enough SUV-like for some customers to do hauling, towing, etc. The Outlander, even if executed well, will have a low EV only range (maybe 25 miles in good conditions, 15 in cold) and AWD use will drain that battery faster. It’s also a market segment not known for early adopters or those caring about sustainability/the environment.

      So, the niche will be relatively affluent SUV customers who care about the environment enough to pay a little extra but don’t want to (or can’t) spend $100k for the full BEV MX. Since most people shudder at making more drastic changes (smaller cars, bicycle riding, public transportation) – and in many cases “can’t” (though I believe “can’t” is often just “won’t”, though I admit I’m more eco and anti-consumer fanatical than most), that’s probably a growing market segment actually. So perhaps it will do well, but it is by no means a runaway hit. Mitsubishi will have to manage the expectations well.

  3. Jeff says:

    IMo, ther’s a different consumer for those with deep pockets. They will have the Tesla as an option.
    Mits may have to have a giga-factory of their own at some point.

    I think it is BS to wait to sell in the US just because of california.
    I can’t imagine if I buy a car elsewhere in the country, I can’t register it in california.
    I HOPE the new model has more room than the current Outlander.

  4. DaveMart says:

    I’ve seen a lot of negative comment by Americans on Mitsubishi.
    Maybe I haven’t been looking in the right place, but I have not seen the same negative perceptions from Europeans.

    Its a lot easier to run a small brand in Europe in some ways, as for a start the higher density of population mean that you can get reasonable coverage with relatively few dealers.

    Even in Australia around 90% of the population lives in a few big cities, so good coverage is not difficult.

    After the belly-flop of the iMiEv, I think Mitsubishi see themselves as needing a relaunch in the US with the Outlander PHEV, followed as quickly as they can with a full sized SUV.