Detailed EPA Ratings For Mini Countryman PHEV Reveal Electric Range Of Just 12 Miles

3 days ago by Eric Loveday 62

MINI Cooper S E Countryman ALL4

The Mini Cooper S E Countryman ALL4 plug-in hybrid harkens back to an era when plug-ins returned just over 10 miles of all-electric range. Disappointment? Absolutely.

With its near-SUV shape, we didn’t expect the Countryman ALL4 to be efficient, but even we were shocked by how poorly Mini’s first PHEV performed on EPA tests.

First up is MPG. The Countryman ALL4 does okay in this regard with the following numbers:

  • 28 MPG City
  • 27 MPG Highway
  • 27 MPG Combined

Here’s the detailed info from the EPA’s database:

Upon further examination you’ll notice that other versions of the Countryman fare slightly better in the highway MPG category:

Countryman All4 PHEV Compared To Some Other Countryman Models

Note the 65 MPGe rating. That too is much lower than anticipated. In fact, the high-powered BMW i8 fares far better all around than does the chunky Mini.  How “bad” is it?  The EPA says it will actually cost you more to drive a Countryman PHV over the average car (~$250 more over 5 years).

BMW i8 Compared To Mini Countryman ALL4

It all falls apart for the Countryman ALL4 PHEV when examining electric-only range. With its 7.6 kWh battery, this Mini is simply under equipped in the kWh category:

  • 12.64 miles city
  • 12.08 miles highway
  • 12 miles combined

Hello last decade!

One last comparo for your consideration:

BMW Brand PHEVs Compared

Your eyes are not deceiving you. The Mini Countryman ALL4 is outdone in every efficiency category by all three of the BMWs listed above. To boot, the Mini’s tiny gas tank of only 9.5 gallons limits its total range to under 300 miles (270 miles to be exact).

US pricing for the Mini Countryman ALL4 PHEV starts from $36,800. For that coin, there are far more efficient plug-ins available, but us Mini fans might not cross shop. For many of us, it’s Mini for the win, regardless of what the sensible choice might be.

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62 responses to "Detailed EPA Ratings For Mini Countryman PHEV Reveal Electric Range Of Just 12 Miles"

  1. unlucky says:

    The EPA makes a distinction between 12 miles AER and 0-12. This car gets 0-12 on electricity, 12 on “elec + gas”.

    And 2mi/kWh efficiency? Wow that’s bad.

  2. bro1999 says:

    My God, what’s the point.

    1. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

      It is tweaked for performance, so not surprising that it suffers somewhat but pretty bad. Won’t even get HOV-lane stickers.

      I wouldn’t be surprised if a similar effect of EPA and CARB realities are why we still don’t have the Outlander PHEV in the USA.

      This PHEV has an NEDC CO2 49g/km.
      Outlander PHEV is 42g/km. Outlander has a larger battery (12kWh) as well.
      For reference Opel Ampera (Gen 1 Volt) was 27g/km NEDC.

      1. Bacardi says:

        How do we know it won’t qualify for a HOV sticker in CA? CA DMV only lists two 2018 vehicles currently…

        1. Lawrence says:

          It won’t matter because it’s not likely that the green sticker will get renewed at expiration on Jan 1, 2019

        2. ItsNotAboutTheMoney says:

          Never mind.

          I was mixing up the CA rebate requirement with the TZEV requirements. TZEV only needs 10 miles range. The rebate needs 20 miles range.

        3. Benjamin says:

          It won’t. It rated “3” of out 10 in EPA smog rating. The gas engine is too dirty. It’s not a TZEV.

      2. mx says:

        The BMW i3 will blow it away.
        The soon BMW i3S will blow it away more.

        People should look at the available leases on an i3.
        Start with a buying service like TrueCar.com, and get your lease details.

        1. Mark.ca says:

          Better to start here if one is looking for leases…
          http://ev-vin.blogspot.com/

          1. William says:

            Most definitely. Lease deals pop up like whack a mole, on a weekly basis. Get the best deals on them, while dealers are trying to pick up and deliver month end, and quarter end, sales quotas / allotments.

    2. pjwood1 says:

      What do ya’ mean? The MINI Cooper S E Countryman All…. Oh wait, I gotta recharge.

      1. Nix says:

        LOL’z!!!

    3. Viking79 says:

      ZEV crefits, If it has AER 10+ miles it gets credits differently than less than 10 starting 2018.

      Eric

  3. Dr. Miguelito Loveless says:

    Jeebus, my RAV4 EV manages 78mpge and it weights over two tons.

    This is an utter waste of time and material. Anyone who buys this is completely clueless.

    1. CLIVE says:

      Jesus on a Hippy Bus?

  4. Taylor S Marks says:

    Tesla announces that the first production Model 3 will be built today, and the first 30 will be delivered in 3 weeks. Their stock falls by 20%.

    BMW announces the car that’s supposed to save the company is complete garbage. Stock doesn’t budge.

    1. bro1999 says:

      The IIHS fiasco and soft Model S/X sales were the main drivers of the stock nosedive.

      1. Vexar says:

        As well as a few nasty-grams from market analysts doubtful of the production figures. This Thursday was a perfect storm of bad news lining up. It will level out, probably bounce big when October rolls around. That Australia battery contract was no small spuds!

      2. speculawyer says:

        It can also just be the “buy on the rumor, sell on the news” phenomenon.

    2. unlucky says:

      There is no reason to think this is the car that is supposed to save BMW. Problems with this car won’t affect BMW much at all.

    3. Tom says:

      ‘Save the company’? Ummm…BMW has record sales I believe and is extremely profitable. The company made a net profit of over $7 billion in 2016. They are however experiencing a margin squeeze due to large investments in electric vehicles.

    4. Nix says:

      Actually it is pretty typical for stocks to go up on anticipation of good news, and then drop on the good news. This happens when more people bet on the news being good than actually want to hold the stock after they hear the news is good.

      It is a classic symptom of stock speculators getting in before the news because they are betting the news will be good, believing the stock will go up on good news. Their plan is to exit when the good news becomes public, in belief that the stock will be more valuable after the good news.

      The problem is that when too many people get the exact same idea, their buying drives the stock up past what the good news should do, and then when the good news happens and the stock doesn’t jump the speculators bail. Meanwhile, a bunch of computers are buying on the rise, and selling on the fall with no rea thought going on. This amplifies the effect.

      Keep in mind that over the last year, TSLA is still up quite substantially from the $178 it was at before.

      This doesn’t really reflect on Tesla itself, as it reflects on the incredible volatility of TSLA stocks.

  5. Mark C says:

    Well, at least it uses Premium fuel. That way you can still feel superior, while everyone that knows what it is will know better.

  6. DJ says:

    Here’s to hoping cities like London don’t let cars like this get away from paying congestion charges.

    This is just F’ing sad…

  7. William L. says:

    Wonder how much perineum BMW is going to charger over regular Mini Cooper S

  8. Indeed, that must be one of the most pointless vehicles ever. Whoever is actually buying this, suffers one’s own fault.

  9. Alan says:

    There can’t be many cars on the market that has a longer name than it has all electric miles !

  10. hpver says:

    Geez. Horrendous. Looks an awful lot like they weren’t really trying — something that seems to happen too often with EVs and plug-ins.

    Tesla, by contrast, clearly cares. Nissan seems to care somewhat but not enough. And say what you want about the Bolt or about Chevy’s management, it’s clear at least that the engineers who designed the Bolt cared and were trying.

    1. unlucky says:

      Now I wish we could get GM marketing to try more.

      I get all kinds of Bolt ads in my browser. But that’s just GM preaching to the converted. I’d love to see them get out there more and win some customers who didn’t know they were already well suited to a Bolt/Volt.

  11. Gazz says:

    Or for slightly less you can have a Model 3 and never buy petrol again.

  12. CDAVIS says:

    non·sen·si·cal
    ˌnänˈsensək(ə)l/
    adjective

    1. having no meaning; making no sense.

    2. ridiculously impractical or ill-advised.

    3. Mini Cooper SE Countryman All4 PHEV with an electric range of just 12 miles

    synonyms: foolish, insane, stupid, idiotic, illogical, irrational, senseless, absurd

    1. Gazz says:

      So getting that framed

  13. David Murray says:

    The only possible appeal this could have would be if I was already determined that I wanted a Mini Countryman.. I guess this is slightly better than the gas-only version. Other than that, it seems a disappointment on all levels.

    1. Tom says:

      I think you just described every Mini purchaser. In their defense, the Mini has an extremely cramped package already. Putting in a meaningful electric motor and battery pack added to the already crammed motor and AWD system was probably very challenging without a complete re-design. It probably works in BEV form where it’s a swap out but ADDING hardware probably quite difficult to pull off.

    2. wavelet says:

      The entire Mini range is for wannabees who want the retro cred without dealing with actual old cars.

      This is no different from the Fiat 500 & New VW Bug. All impractical space-inefficient cars with big profit margins.

  14. Asak says:

    The whole BMW line-up with the exception of the i3 actually looks pretty crappy. These gas guzzlers get such pathetic fuel economy that the Tesla P100 actually has almost the same range. And it’s also more efficient.

    I know people don’t generally buy these for the fuel economy, but I think that’s kind of sad when a full BEV has equal range to a gas mobile. Sure, you can refuel faster than you can recharge, but still…

    With the super charger system if I were in the market for a $100K+ car, which I’m not, I’d be hard pressed to choose the i8 over the Tesla.

  15. TimE says:

    If it can’t go at least 30 miles on electricity, it shouldn’t count as a PHEV.

    Maybe we should call these pathetic things “Mild PHEV’s”

    1. David Murray says:

      Well, in all fairness, I tend to refer to PHEVs as being either weak-PHEV or strong-PHEV. The vast majority of PHEVs on the market right now fall into the weak category. Only the Volt, ELR, CT6, and BMW i3 Rex can really count as a strong PHEV. The Prius Prime is close. If it had another 5 miles of range, I could maybe lump it in as a strong PHEV.

      1. Nix says:

        Karma Revero…. (yea, I know…)

      2. unlucky says:

        I don’t know what your criteria are, but if it is not using gas until it’s out of electricity then the ELR (after the first year) and the CT6 don’t count I don’t think. They operate more like a Ford Fusion Energi (2nd generation).

        There’s already a name for a car that operates like a Volt. You can call it an EREV.

        If you weaken the definition just a bit to include the ELR and CT6 then the Ford Energis go in there. And the Prius Prime does too, handily.

    2. Gazz says:

      Won’t be able to register one in London as Taxi from new years. Needs to have 30+ miles.
      So behind current technology.

    3. Nix says:

      30 miles for a small car, 20 miles for an SUV.

      When you do the math, the savings of replacing an ICE SUV with a 20 mile PHEV SUV, is about the same as replacing an ICE small car with a 30+ mile small PHEV.

      It is somewhat counter-intuitive, but after you do the math it all makes sense.

  16. Mister G says:

    What a joke.

  17. speculawyer says:

    Trying to cram two powertrains into a tiny car seems like an obviously stupid idea.

    Yet they went ahead and did it. :-/ Ugh.

    C’mon automakers, put a PHEV drivetrain INTO BIG VEHICLES like SUVs, minivans, pick-ups, etc.

  18. Koenigsegg says:

    Complete trash.

    Volt triumphs over all and Tesla is Daddy

  19. BillT says:

    Surely those numbers are for the scenario where one is towing a 3 ton trailer? Yeesh.

  20. ModernMarvelFan says:

    It is for Mini fans who wants to brag about “being green”. Also, it is an European Major City “compliance car” so it can be driven in the city centers.

    1. Nix says:

      Exactly what I was thinking. They should come stamped with a big “EU ONLY” sticker on the EPA window sticker.

  21. brendan says:

    What a let down! For a PHEV i would expect a minimum range of at least 50km…make it real life practical. 12km doesn’t justifies the hassle

  22. Nix says:

    The premium gas keeps it more expensive to run than the typical car. If the drop the premium gas requirement, they could get under, but they really need more battery range to suit the typical US household.

    Right now, this is really limited to just people who really need AWD, and who can charge at work to maybe squeeze 24 miles of electric range out of it. That might be good for around 7,000 miles of EV driving. Short of the typical Leaf driver who gets close to 10K/yr on electricity, but better than nothing. Or for people who drive substantially less than the yearly average.

    They would be better off adding AWD to the i3.

  23. Nix says:

    MiniE test fleet drivers must be banging their head into a wall at this point. The original MiniE’s had 100+ miles of range nearly a decade ago.

    Lots of folks expected Mini to follow up their test fleet with actual MiniE sales right away. Still no pure electric Mini years later.

  24. Rick Bronson says:

    Looks like the Mini Division is headed by an oilman who wants it to be as inefficient as possible. And the price of $36,800 is outrageously expensive. And why premium gas, this is not a luxury vehicle.

    Just wait for few more months, Ioniq Plugin is coming to the market and its a very spacious vehicle. Soon it will be followed by Niro Plugin which has the height of a Crossover.

    Ioniq Plugin is priced nearly Pounds 4,200 below Prius Prime in UK market.

  25. Benedictus says:

    Cars like this are the reason PHEV no longer get incentivised as much as they did in the Netherlands. Almost no electric range and worse gasoline use add up to hardly any net gain in efficiency or CO2 savings (if not worse).

  26. Courtney Vegan says:

    First,get rid of those fugly roof rails. Then put a engine that does not require premium,then hold a press conference saying, because this thing has garbage range,we have to cancel and go back to the drawing board.

  27. jakaracman says:

    I’ve driven the Mini PHEV and it does (with a short motorway part) almost 20 miles, a little bit more than BMW 225xe with which it shares drivetrain (except battery). If my wife would be using it, it would drive her gas cost down to almost zero (instead of about 55 she gets form her hybrid) …
    So it’s OK for what it’s meant to be. I’d take it any day over S D version.

  28. WARREN says:

    I drove the car too. Very torquey and smooth acceleration. So this car may appeal to those that appreciate the sure footed awd, sporty driving experience. The interior quality and fit were also level above a Bolt or Tesla.

  29. cab says:

    Good feedback from Warren and Jakaracman. This car is EXCLUSIVELY for buyers who are already going to purchase a mini regardless.

    I am still, however, not quite convinced this car is as compelling even within the Mini line-up as say the new BMW 530e is in the BMW 5 series line-up (the latter is nearly identical to the 530i in performance and price and likely ends up a no-brainer option over the 530i there).

    At least with a ZERO to twelve mile EV range, the average buyer shouldn’t be too disappointed it doesn’t get the EV range promised (i.e. anything more than zero ends up being gravy).

    1. Warren says:

      Yup, they are not exactly my cup of tea, but when I sat in one at the LA autoshow I was pleasantly surprised. And when I drove one , I found it to be quick and refined with the AWAD.You can see the interior detail is pretty unique and caters to their following:

      (google link)

    2. jakaracman says:

      Dont’ compare it to 530e. Diffrenet size, different powertrain. Mini shares platform and most of PHEV tech with BMW 225xe PHEV, but has bigger battery and more place – and has same price to comparable diesel Mini Countryman S D ALL4 (in countores with subsidies for PHEVs it’s cheaper). So it makes perfect sense: you get a car that has same or better fuel economy (depends on how much you charge and drive EV, but 20 miles range is enough for daily EV driving for a lot of people), but don’t need to get diesel.

      Also in meny countries with subisdies S E has more or less same price than S.

      Same goes for BMW 225xe.

      There are many people that ar OK to pay same price for PHEV as for a diesel. Most of them would not buy it if it cost more than diesel. So it will probably be successful (as BMW 225xe). And it will keep people away from disesls, which is good. There are too may in Europe. So this PHEV makes perfect sense for some markets. Maybe not US as fuel is really cheap, but in EU is different matter.

  30. Bob Nan says:

    Sales of Mini took a 10% hit in 2017 YTD.
    The retro active design is not very fuel efficient. But just those who love that brand are buying it.

    They can use the plugin technology in the entire line up to show that its really a premium car and sell. But BMW choose to ignore it.

    How many customers will buy this produce for nearly 37 K when many more plugins are available at 30 K range.

  31. Doug Bostrom says:

    Leaving aside the 12 mile range, it’s a shame to see yet another PHEV with the charging port on the side of the car, particularly on what is normally the street side. This makes charging on street impossible in many circumstances.

    Nissan and others with a “neutrally” mounted port make a more sensible choice.

  32. Benjamin says:

    It’s the only PHEV where you will be actually spending more time at a gas station because of inefficiency and a paltry 9.5 gallon gas tank!!!

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