Chevrolet Volt Sales Officially Surpass 100,000 in U.S.

7 months ago by Eric Loveday 65

Gen 1 Chevy Volt

Gen 1 Chevy Volt

Gen 2 Chevy Volt

Gen 2 Chevy Volt

As we predicted, Chevrolet Volt sales surpassed 100,000 units in late July.

Proud of the achievement, General Motors issued a statement on the event with this subtitle – “First Model to Reach Milestone for Plug-In Vehicles,” which is true, provided you limit the scope to U.S. sales only.

General Motors adds:

“How much of an impact do 100,000 Volts out on the road make? As it turns out, quite a bit. Since sales of the Chevrolet Volt began, owners have driven almost 1.5 billion miles in EV mode of a total 2.5 billion cumulative miles. Based on an average new car fuel economy of 25.3 miles per gallon, Volt drivers have saved nearly 58 million gallons of fuel. That is enough gasoline to fill more than 87 competition-size swimming pools.”

Steve Majoros, director of marketing, Chevrolet Cars and Crossovers, commented:

“The Chevrolet Volt delivers not just a fun driving experience behind the wheel, but has become the first vehicle with plug-in electrification technology to truly become mainstream. Not only is the Volt a class-creator, it serves as the foundation of a Chevrolet electric family that will soon add the first long-range, affordable EV available to customers across the U.S., the Chevrolet Bolt EV.”

And here’s an interesting tidbit of info we can add to the 100,000 Volt equation. Not even one Volt battery pack has required replacement due to “general battery degradation.” More on that soon, so stay tuned.

CHEVROLET VOLT ACHIEVES 100,000 SALES IN THE UNITED STATES

First Model to Reach Milestone for Plug-In Vehicles

DETROIT – Chevrolet is announcing the sale of 100,000 Volts, giving those owners a no-compromise electric driving experience with a plug-in vehicle offering an EPA-estimated 53 miles of electric vehicle range and a total range of 420 miles between gasoline fill-ups or full recharges*.

“The Chevrolet Volt delivers not just a fun driving experience behind the wheel, but has become the first vehicle with plug-in electrification technology to truly become mainstream,” said Steve Majoros, director of marketing, Chevrolet Cars and Crossovers. “Not only is the Volt a class-creator, it serves as the foundation of a Chevrolet electric family that will soon add the first long-range, affordable EV available to customers across the U.S., the Chevrolet Bolt EV.”

How much of an impact do 100,000 Volts out on the road make? As it turns out, quite a bit. Since sales of the Chevrolet Volt began, owners have driven almost 1.5 billion miles in EV mode of a total 2.5 billion cumulative miles. Based on an average new car fuel economy of 25.3 miles per gallon, Volt drivers have saved nearly 58 million gallons of fuel. That is enough gasoline to fill more than 87 competition-size swimming pools.

The second-generation Volt improves on the pioneering work of the original, adding additional electric-only range, improved fuel economy of 106 mpg-e and 42 mpg, and a chassis that is lighter than the original. The second-generation Volt is 220 pounds lighter than the first-generation and delivers 19 percent stronger 0-30 mph electric acceleration while providing 39 percent greater pure EV range. Based on Chevrolet data, Chevrolet expects the average 2017 Volt driver who fully charges the car regularly to travel more than 1,000 miles between gas fill ups.*

The Volt offers industry-leading smartphone integration, with support for Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, along with an onboard, available OnStar 4G LTE connection—features that will leave the next 100,000 owners of the Chevrolet Volt even more satisfied.

*EPA estimated 53-mile EV range based on 106 mpg-e combined city/highway (electric) and 42 mpg combined city/highway (gas). Actual range varies with conditions.

Tags: , , , ,

65 responses to "Chevrolet Volt Sales Officially Surpass 100,000 in U.S."

  1. Lee says:

    So, how many Volts are purchased in July 2016?

    1. bro1999 says:

      It HAS to be above 2k for July, especially with the 20% off deals that was offered on leftover ’16 Volts. That pretty much wiped out what was left of the ’16s, which still numbered 400-500 as of 1 July.

      1. Lee says:

        I figured out that to achieve 100k, the sales should exceed 1768, which makes your guess pretty reasonable. However, with Bolt coming up this October, would there not be any delay of purchase?

    2. Bonaire says:

      Will know at 10am

      1. Bonaire says:

        Actually, earlier.

        2406 sales in the USA in July. Up 83.2%.

  2. John says:

    I am one of those happy Volt owners.
    I’ve put over 50,000 completely trouble free miles on my 2013.

    I have a 35 mile round-trip commute, so I get the most out of my electric range almost every day.

    As far as GM’s estimate of 1,000 between fill-ups…I usually get about 4,000 =)

    In 56,640 miles, 46,610 have been electric. (82.3%)

    http://www.voltstats.net/Stats/Details/3988

    In the time I’ve had mine, we bought my wife one. My mother bought one. And I’ve had two co-workers buy Volts. They’re kind of contagious!

    1. ArkansasVolt says:

      your story sounds like mine. I bought mine 5 years ago, and within a year: my parents bought one, 2 coworkers bought one, and a family friend bought one.

      1. James says:

        Go you guys!

        People who actually drive a Volt are always surprised and often delighted.

        Converts to Volt from Prius are many. They could be more – but GM needs to pit Volt against Prius in some ads. That probably won’t happen.

        BMW, Audi and Mercedes types drive a Volt and are amazed at the luxury drive – electric drive is addictive. Some are really taken aback that it’s a (pedestrian) Chevrolet.

        I love the grass roots, word of mouth, social media surge that bolsters the Volt sales. It’s like an underground movement, and it seems to be gaining momentum EVEN in this time of record low gas prices.

        Begs the question: Will there be a 3rd generation Volt?

      2. ClarksonCote says:

        Haha! Same here. Since I’ve bought one, my wife has too, as has six co-workers. SIX! In a company of 300 people. 🙂

  3. Brian says:

    “1.5 billion miles in EV mode of a total 2.5 billion cumulative miles”

    So fleet-wide, Volts are only driving 60% of their miles in EV mode? To me, this implies that there are a large number of them that simply aren’t plugged in every night (maybe never!). Most people should be getting 80% or more of their miles in EV!

    1. Kdawg says:

      Or they take the Volt on a long trip, which is common. It only takes 1 or 2 long trips to destroy your Voltstats #’s.

    2. bro1999 says:

      Yeah, someone who typically drives 1,000 miles a month all EV for 3 months, then takes one 1,000 road trip, will only have a 75% EV mile ratio even though 98% of their overall trips are EV-only.

    3. M Hovis says:

      Partially true Brian. I know of at least one source locally that has sold over 30 used Volts from the same source of which all of them list a lifetime MPG of 35 or less. This is proof that there are fleets out there doing what you describe.

      On the other hand, you have to remember this spec. 3% of Volt trips make up 30% or more of their miles. I personally match the statistic. My lifetime MPG after 50,000 miles is 165. I drive 90% electric everyday 97% of the time. The there are those 5 hour trips to the beach in the summer which makes me fit into the 70/30% camp.

      The 200 mile BEVs may change this AND the new 53 mile Volts will move the percent some, but not as much as you would think as long as the long vacation trips are still there.

      The real story here though is the carrot that Eric threw out of not a “single” Volt battery replaced. THAT is an IEV story I can’t wait to read.

    4. Bacardi says:

      One story claims 70% of PHEVs do not plug in every night…
      http://www.vox.com/2016/5/24/11677684/wireless-charging-electric-vehicles

      This also brings up the less efficient wireless charging debate…Maybe 10% of energy is lost through wireless yet if you get more EV miles it seems like the lesser of all evils…

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        “old me one automaker has done an internal survey of its plug-in hybrid-electric vehicle (PHEV) owners and discovered that 70 percent of them never plug in. They use the vehicles as ordinary hybrids, sacrificing an enormous amount of fuel economy (which they paid extra for!) just because nightly plugging in is a hassle.

        (Gruzen can’t reveal which automaker, so I can’t confirm the survey, but this study and this one support the conclusion that PHEV owners plug in far less than would be optimal.)”

        I am going to call you on your repeated BS here.

        So, the story you linked is a survey from a single automaker from its own PHEV. I am guessing it is highly likely to be Prius Plugin. But someone you conclude that as “One story claims 70% of PHEVs do not plug in every night”

        So, how did you derive 1 survey from 1 automaker on a model to 70% of PHEVs?

        1. Bacardi says:

          It’s extremely easy to call something BS when you don’t provide any data yourself…If you’re calling 70% BS, what proof do you have that it’s not? Even if we determined that it’s 40% that do not, that’s still pretty low…

          1. ModernMarvelFan says:

            “It’s extremely easy to call something BS when you don’t provide any data yourself…If you’re calling 70% BS, what proof do you have that it’s not? Even if we determined that it’s 40% that do not, that’s still pretty low…”

            LOL. Really? Your own data shows that is simply not the case for cars like the Volt. Your own data shows that it is for Prius Plugin.

            Go and research on INL study and see what % they are for each of the cars in the study from Volt to Energi to PIP.

            We know at least that 70% number is BS for the Volt alone.

            I also own a Volt and know plenty of other PHEV owners. the only group that doesn’t plug it in is the PIP owners. Both Energi and Volt owners plug them in as much as they can.

            I still wait for you to show where your 70% of PHEV come from. Since your original claim and so called reference are debunked, it is your responsibility to show further proof as others have called you on it in the past.

            1. Kdawg says:

              Didn’t GM say that something like 80% of all Volt trips were gas free. And the Gen2 could raise that to 90%?

              1. Bacardi says:

                If you have a source please post…What was said was gen1/gen2 are within 80%/90% of drives…that’s under the assumption that they’re the car has a 100% charge…

                But apparently here someone claims to have the data of 100k+ Volt & knows the exact % of who plug in…

            2. Bacardi says:

              If you think its BS, it’s your responsibly to voice your opinion to the original author of article…Ah, the dismissive nature of EV advocates never gets old…

      2. ModernMarvelFan says:

        To counter more of your false claims (that has been posted by your repeatly in the past),

        In your own links of study where the numbers come from:

        “for the Prius population was 26% of the total VMT. Prius drivers use electricity for only about a quarter of
        the trip or about 10.6 miles per day, significantly lower than the Volt with an average of 28.9 electric
        miles per day,”

        So, it is clear that Vox article is referring to the Prius Plugin population where everyone know that majority of those in Califonria only bought the car for the HOV stickers.

        You are making generalization of entire population of PHEV based on a the data from the weakest PHEV model. That is dishonest.

  4. Ziv says:

    I have had my 2013 for 38 months and used 32 gallons of gasoline. I have replaced 3 tires and that is about it for maintenance. Nice car.

  5. Dave S. says:

    We love our 2013 volt. My wife drives for work and 100 mile days are not uncommon. We have over 53,000 miles and about 30,000 are electric. I would have preferred a Leaf, but the range wasn’t enough. We’re considering a Bolt to replace it next year.

  6. Fool Cells says:

    i have about 5300 miles on my 2017 and love it! Easily the best car i have ever owned. So smooth and so quiet. I did like my G35x, but this Volt is special. My house is my gas station. Still have over 1/2 the original tank.

  7. jmac says:

    The volt is Selling well in Canada. In the first 6 months of 2015 there were 425 Volts sold. For the first six months of 2016 there were 1292 sold.*

    How aboot that, eh?

    * Figures are from Good car-Bad car website

  8. Mike says:

    Image if GM actually tried marketing the Volt! I really like my 2013, but I still find it puzzling that GM puts essentially no effort into selling them.

    1. vdiv says:

      They do, in California, where they get ZEV credits, which is why half of all EV sales are there.

  9. Vik says:

    I was one of the people to buy a Volt in July and it’s truly an awesome car but some dealers make life difficult. The first dealer I walked into advertised 20% off current Volts even though the discount was only for 2016 volts which were never in my state of Georgia. When we agreed on the price and got ready to sign papers, the dealer changed the price claiming they made a “mistake” in reading their own advertisement. This particular dealer even had a 2017 sitting out front with a 20% off sticker on the side, which sat there for another 2 weeks even after they found out about their “mistake”. I ended up going to another dealer where I had a much better experience and got a better price, even though the original dealer claimed to give me special discounts for accidentally “mis-advertising”. Its really a hit or miss with all these dealerships

  10. Terawatt says:

    I’m surprised that EV mode doesn’t account for more than 60% of miles driven. I’ve long argued that the parallel hybrids with tiny battery packs aren’t anywhere near as green as their makers like to pretend, and when a hybrid like the Volt, which has a very respectable all-electric range, turns out to end up using the ICE engine for 40% of driving, I’d say I’m vindicated. Cars like BMW X5 and Volvo XC90 aren’t green, even with a plug.

    I also must say I find it incredibly disingenuous to parrot Chevrolets “calculated to impress” numbers of the impact of 100 000 Volts on the road. Humans are awful at intuiting these sorts of things, so it’s pretty easy to make something SEEM like it’s huge. Of course what actually matters is how large it is compared to another huge – the total fuel consumption. But if they were to inform us that the Volt has reduced total fuel consumption, compared to what it would be if those 100 000 cars were average-MPG cars, by much less than 0.1% it wouldn’t be as awesome.

    Sadly the truth is that even if all cars were replaced by Volts, it still isn’t enough with only 60% of miles driven in EV mode. Emissions have to come down by 90%, and so we need to have much more ambitious goals than halving consumption. (CO2 emissions are a direct consequence of consumption, exactly proportional, so it is really one and the same.)

    Of course it’s better than continuing ICE madness unchanged. But I really hope that plugin hybrids become utterly irrelevant, or a fringe phenomenon, by 2020. Only BEVs have the potential to deliver the sort of cuts required – and even they will do so only if we also manage to green electricity quite rapidly.

    1. ClarksonCote says:

      The 60% number is fleet-wide, biased by fleets who never plug in. Additionally, this is largely a statistic from the Gen 1 Volt, with 38 miles electric range. The Gen 2 has 53 miles, so this number should increase quite a bit.

      VoltStats.net is a great source of data that proves how well the Volt can really reduce gasoline usage. It’ll only get better with all the Gen 2 Volts on the road.

    2. jmac says:

      Agree with Terrawatt. Phev and Erev are at best just “training wheels”, while the all electric BEV are the real deal.

      Plug-in hybrids just moderate oil usage, they don’t eliminate it by any stretch of the imagination.

      Plug-in hybrids all use a gasoline fueled piston engine as the main power plant for the car.

      Cars like the original Prius PIP at 13 miles electric only range are simply nothing more than a compliance car joke. Now, people are suing Toyota claiming that in reality the PIP only got 8-9 miles in all-electric mode, not even the pathetic 13 miles Toyota advertised. People bought them for the HOV stickers and that’s about it.

      Even the extended range electrics like the Volt are fundamentally tied to the internal combustion engine and oil and are therefore not quite as “green” as people have made them out to be. They have limited use when it comes to actually reducing gasoline consumption.

      Nevertheless, hats off to the Volt for the 100K milestone. It’s probably the best of the plug-in hybrids.

      1. pvpwr says:

        Yet even the gen I Volt managed to average pretty much the same EV miles driven per year as the worlds top selling BEV (LEAF). I am not putting down the LEAF, just tired of you purists having to take a dump on every thread you see about the Volt.

      2. ClarksonCote says:

        “Agree with Terrawatt. Phev and Erev are at best just “training wheels”, while the all electric BEV are the real deal.”

        I call shenanigans. Yes, those 100% BEVs will not use any gasoline, but when longer trips are needed until we have a nationwide infrastructure, another vehicle will most certainly be used and burn gas.

        So it’s disingenuine to say a BEV will burn less gas. Effectively, it may burn more.

      3. ModernMarvelFan says:

        “While the all electric BEV are the real deal.”

        Are the BEVs real deal when their owners keep a separate ICE car such as Prius which is 100% gasoline powered for longer trips still real deal?

        Volt allows you to replace two cars with 1.

        Yes, Tesla or Bolt with great DCFC coverage can eventually replace cars like the Volt. But the fact remains that many (not all) BEV owners still have another gas car for the longer trips.

        Your bias against other forms of BEVs are just silly. The entire PEV sales are less than 1% of the market. Yet we need more inflightings that started by people like you! Short sighted!

    3. pvpwr says:

      Terawatt, I see what you did there..

      ” But if they were to inform us that the Volt has reduced total fuel consumption, compared to what it would be if those 100 000 cars were average-MPG cars, by much less than 0.1% it wouldn’t be as awesome.”

      You could say the exact same thing about any plug in on the market. So you have no point.

      Gen I Volt averaged the same kind of EV miles driven as gen I LEAF.

      Nice try though.

    4. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “Sadly the truth is that even if all cars were replaced by Volts, it still isn’t enough with only 60% of miles driven in EV mode. Emissions have to come down by 90%, and so we need to have much more ambitious goals than halving consumption. ”

      One thing you don’t understand is the fact that many Volt owners drive all EV miles daily but on weekend or for vacation, they put thousands of gas miles for those long trips. If they had a car like the LEAF, they might have switched to their other gas car or rent a gas car…

      Lastly, transportation only accounts for about 20% of global CO2 emission. If we cut 60% out, that is directly 12% of global emsission.

    5. Bill Howland says:

      Since most CO2 emissions this century will come from China, and India – and their emissions will increase more than the USA’s will ever decrease, perhaps you’d like to convince them they need to change by moving there and making your great persuasiveness more effective.

      Look at all the sick children in London and Paris that would be healthy if the powers-that-be hadn’t listened to BIG EXPERT nonsense about Diesels making less GHG, and therefore, the cars are ‘Clean Diesels’. They conveniently leave out the diesel particulate problem which has caused all the health problems.

  11. sven says:

    “Based on an average new car fuel economy of 25.3 miles per gallon, Volt drivers have saved nearly 58 million gallons of fuel.”

    Shouldn’t they be computing fuel saved by comparing it to an ICE Cruse, which gets 35 mpg Combined, or the average mpg rating for compact ICE cars?

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “Shouldn’t they be computing fuel saved by comparing it to an ICE Cruse, which gets 35 mpg Combined, or the average mpg rating for compact ICE cars?”

      Or depending on the use case and if it is city driving.

      Cruze has 4 different EPA mpg listed with auto transmission (combined/City/Hwy)

      35/30/42 Cruze 1.4 T with S/S
      31/26/39 Cruze Eco
      34/30/40 Cruze Premier with 1.4 T
      27/22/35 Cruze Limited with 1.8L

    2. ClarksonCote says:

      Some people trade in a Cruze. Others trade in a truck, a Prius, or a BMW 3 series. The only general metric that makes sense is the one that they used above.

  12. jmac says:

    The Volt power train set-up is similar to that of a diesel electric train. Like the train, it is basically a series hybrid. The genset in the Volt makes electricity for the electric traction motors just like the V-12 diesel generator does in a diesel-electric train. Electric traction motors propel the train down the tracks.

    No one in their right mind claims that a series hybrid diesel-electric train is an electric train. Yet, many claim that the Volt is an electric car, even GM does. It is not. It is a series hybrid.

    A few years ago the French decided to install lithium battery banks on their diesel trains that would allow trains at the station or in the switch yard to operate electrically. But, even with the new batteries, they are still just diesels.

    Even though the Volt has a 53 mile electric range, it’s still at heart a gas-electric hybrid. This fact gets lost in all the enthusiasm fans have for the car and the fact that GM originally advertised the Volt as an ‘electric’ car.

    If our goal is to ultimately get off gasoline altogether then PHEVs, even the magnificent Chevy Volt will not get us there.

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “The Volt power train set-up is similar to that of a diesel electric train. Like the train”

      The difference is that Trains are similar to Prius (non-plugin version).

      Can trains move without diesel at all?

      Volt can drive for months without a drop of gasoline if plugged in daily…

      That is the key difference.

      As far as terms or label goes, only a bunch of extremist would care to split hair at this point.

      Do you call electric bicycles hybrid? when in fact, they are hybrids (human and electric in parallel).

      1. Bill Howland says:

        Month and a half. In the summertime. Otherwise, it will use some gas. But not much.

        My Nephew who borrows my car alot initially tried plugging in anytime he’d exceed the electric range. Then, a former girlfriend accused him of plugging in at 110 at her house for an hour and causing a $150 electric bill. He tried explaining it cost only a quarter (if that), but it fell on deaf ears. So now he doesn’t plug in anywhere at all – It gets plugged in when he returns the car, by me, since he’s out of the habit of plugging it in..

  13. jmac says:

    Yes, the new French electro-diesels trains have enough battery power to operate in the switch yard and at the train station without firing up the diesel generator.

    If a car can go 5 miles on battery power alone, is it an electric car ? How about one that can go 18 miles before the generator kicks on ? Is that an electric car ? How about one that can go 36.5 miles before it starts using gas?

    Most people would say that none of the cars above are electric cars.

    If I remember right, the gasoline generator in the Volt also fires up under certain driving conditions such as Mountain Mode. In contrast the Model S doesn’t have a generator to help it get over the mountains.

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “If a car can go 5 miles on battery power alone, is it an electric car ? How about one that can go 18 miles before the generator kicks on ? Is that an electric car ? How about one that can go 36.5 miles before it starts using gas?”

      Don’t you dare to twist the topic. Is that battery charged with grid power or by the generator? If it isn’t grid power, it is just a fancy Prius synergy.

      “If I remember right, the gasoline generator in the Volt also fires up under certain driving conditions such as Mountain Mode. In contrast the Model S doesn’t have a generator to help it get over the mountains.”

      Yes, it does when it is out of juice and have to be towed on the back of the diesel trucks. Same with the LEAF.

      Yeah, you will make the claims that Tesla can be charged so it will go over the mountain on all electricity.

      So will the Volt. YOu probably don’t understand the Volt enough to know that Mountain mode is there to help the REx mode, NOT electric mode. Volt can be charged and make across any mountain in eV mode as long as it has battery charge. Same as Tesla. The difference is size of battery and on board REx which one has the other doesn’t.

      Yes, some others will whine about the direct link of engine to wheel in the REx mode. It doesn’t matter who REx mode operates since it is already gas burning mode. What it matters is its EV mode which is gas free.

      Yes, some others will further bring up stuff such as Engine running for low temperature or maintenance. But none of them are for propulsion which is the key here. Burning gas for heat is no different than using fuel burners.

      There are plenty of other areas to bash the Volt such as limited size and space. But bashing it for simple terms or labels are about 6 years old topic… Get over it.

    2. Nate says:

      You remembered wrong. Mountain or hold modes let you save electiric power. In the context of your sentence it looks like you think the opposite.

      Have fun on your trains buddy. The rest of us will enjoy driving thousands of EV miles while you split hairs at the train yard.

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        Yes, the usual Volt haters are often the ones that are completely clueless about how the Volt works..

  14. jmac says:

    If the Volt is a BEV then take the car back to the dealership and have them rip out the ICE components. You got cheated because they mistakenly put an internal combustion engine in your car.

    I don’t see plug-ins like the Volt ending oil dependence. The Bolt at 200 plus miles between charges WILL do something about oil use, since it does not use any oil at all.

    I’m tired of hearing that a gas electric hybrid like the Volt is an actually a true blue electric car.

    By the way, I am NOT bashing the Volt. I am just pointing out the fact that it is not a pure electric car which apparently some Volt owners secretly believe.

    Musk doesn’t build plug-in hybrids. Why not?

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “I don’t see plug-ins like the Volt ending oil dependence. The Bolt at 200 plus miles between charges WILL do something about oil use, since it does not use any oil at all.”

      BS. It is a big step into the right direction. If 80% of the oil are eliminated with Volt2.0 like range, then that is 80% eliminated.

      Gasoline was originally the byproduct of other oil refinery process. So, there will be some oil usage which will be reduced significantly with cars like Volt.

      “I’m tired of hearing that a gas electric hybrid like the Volt is an actually a true blue electric car.”

      Nobody is claiming that. You are making that stuff up. Everyone is saying that Volt is EREV or an EV or a PEV. Nobody called it BEV. I am tired of people like you who are bashing Volt for being an EV.

      “By the way, I am NOT bashing the Volt. I am just pointing out the fact that it is not a pure electric car which apparently some Volt owners secretly believe.”

      Completely BS. You are bashing it because you don’t even know how it works. Obviously you should get informed before you post some more stuff to prove that you are clueless on how Volt works.

      “Musk doesn’t build plug-in hybrids. Why not?”

      Because Musk doesn’t like transitional stuff. And he doesn’t like to make money until 2020. And please don’t turn this into another one of those Tesla against Volt thing. I am tired defending Volt against other EV supporters. The entire combined PEV market is less than 1%. Maybe you should spend energy trying to convert that 99% for once.

      And if you want to turn this into another Tesla worshiping thread, then you are doing it in the wrong thread.

      This thread is about celebrating the achievement of the Volt, don’t try to turn it into a bash fest and I certainly don’t have the time to educate you further.

      1. Kdawg says:

        Wasn’t Tesla going to do a PHEV first, then changed their minds?

    2. bro1999 says:

      Who ever said the Volt is a BEV?

  15. jmac says:

    Mountain Mode

    “At its root, Mountain Mode is meant to force the Volt to switch from 100% battery-powered mode to charge-sustaining mode (where the engine is burning gas to generate electricity, and sometimes even powering the wheels directly—basically acting as a hybrid) long before the battery is fully drained. GM engineers have said this is to preserve battery power to help get the car up steep slopes with an assist from the electric motors—hence the name “Mountain Mode.” In contrast, in both Normal and Sport modes, the car will use up every last drop of stored battery power it can before switching to charge-sustaining mode.”

    http://www.plugincars.com/chevy-volts-mountain-mode-vastly-underrated-yields-new-driving-strategies-107176.html

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      Instead of quoting some 3rd party, you should learn about the Volt first before you show more ignorance.

      Volt’s mountain mode doesn’t change the EV mode when the battery is full. It is only allocating more battery for the buffering in REx mode so it can sustain more power when climbing steep mountains.

      The mountain mode kicks in when the battery drains to about 3-4kWh left. So, it basically shrinks the battery to a smaller size.

      It doesn’t kick Volt out of EV mode unless the battery is smaller than the buffer requirement. And it does so because its REx operation is less sufficient than its EV mode thus, it gives more credibility to the fact that Volt is designed to be EV first.

      As far as your stupid comment about taking the engine out, it is there so you don’t need a tow truck when you are out of charge without charging available.

      Again, learn how Voltec works before you post more stuff to confirm my comments about you are completely clueless on how Volt works.

  16. jmac says:

    to Nate:

    Mountain Mode let’s you save electric power because you are supposed to hit the Mountain Mode button 10-15 minutes before steep climbing. That’s so the gasoline generator can top off the battery before you begin climbing that will severely drain the battery.

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “That’s so the gasoline generator can top off the battery before you begin climbing that will severely drain the battery.”

      It doesn’t top off in full. It recovers the 3-4kWh needed buffer if it doesn’t exist.

      If your battery is full, it doesn’t change any operation in EV mode whatsoever. It only shrinks available battery range.

    2. pvpwr says:

      jmac, you still seem a bit confused about how mountain mode works, but lets move on. You say the Model S doesn’t need it, so, do you have a Model S? If so, congrats that is a nice car as well but it isn’t meant to compete against the Volt, nor does it due to being twice the price.

      Either way, maybe stick to commenting on threads for the cars you own to limit the amount of misinformation you post.

  17. jmac says:

    The Volt has an internal combustion engine on board. That says it all, Fudsters……

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      Fudsters?

      You are the only one that has been spreading lies about how Volt works here.

      In fact, you are the only one that is trolling here with an article that celebrates Volt’s accomplishment.

    2. Nate says:

      “..That says it all”

      Really, it took you 7 posts where you got ripped apart to say just that. Pathetic.

    3. Bill Howland says:

      “…The Volt has an ICE”

      Many upscale TESLA owners live in middle upper class, or upper class homes with ICE emergency generators so that they charge their Teslas with ‘Fossil Fuel’ when the elctricity fails.

      Also, any supercharger use (of which Elon Musk admonished Tesla Owners to please not hog the local supercharger, but to charge at home, mainly to deaf ears) during the daytime is using a large amount of fossil fuel, at a time when EVERYONE else needs the juice – eliminating the intrinsic advantage EV’s have of charging out of hours.

      Its only an advantage if you do it. The ICE in a PHEV is very tiny, and is more efficiently used in a volt than the emergency generator the Tesla owners have.

  18. jmac says:

    “There are three ways to charge a Chevy Volt: plugging in via J1772 connector, using Mountain Mode, or reclaiming electricity via regenerative braking.”

    http://insideevs.com/far-can-chevrolet-volt-really-go-ev-mode-81-8-miles/

    1. bro1999 says:

      What is your point exactly? Besides giving further evidence you are a complete troll?

    2. ModernMarvelFan says:

      “Let’s discuss what one charge means. There are three ways to charge a Chevy Volt: plugging in via J1772 connector, using Mountain Mode, or reclaiming electricity via regenerative braking”

      Yes, it was written by a Volt owner who has a 2012 Volt which I have as well. The fact remains that you are trolling here by being completely clueless about how Mountain mode works by posting other people’s quote while exposing your stupidity on the issue.

      As I have educated you about the fact that Mountain mode will keep a buffer. So if you switch to Mountain mode when you are below the buffer, the car will charge it back to the 3-4kWh buffer level to keep it for REx mode. and it won’t charge more than than in Mountain mode.

      By keeping hash over the stuff you have no clue in, it will just make your look like a troll here , a stubborn one.

  19. Rick Bronson says:

    Great job GM.

    Hope they will produce more in each trim and sell more. Expecting the 200,000 Worldwide sales first and 200,000 USA sales immediately following it.

    Definitely Gen-2 is priced and engineered to sell much better. Had it not been for lower gas prices, this target should have been achieved last year itself.

  20. Bill Howland says:

    Some of the BEV purists here (I understand most of them don’t even own any kind of EV) have a religious objection to any internal combustion engine at anytime.

    Do you have any clothing with modern materials in it? Do you have any plastics in your home, such as in wiring insulation, plumbing, etc? These all come from, directly or indirectly, natural gas, a fossil fuel.

    Otherwise, If you use any of thes products, it seems hypocritical to me.

    The volt is very noteworthy in that, with proper use, it will convert millions of miles otherwise driven by gasoline, to miles driven by electricity – which is usually optained at the most ‘ecological’ time – that is, over the midnight hour.