Chevrolet Bolt Owners Have Driven 4.5 Million Miles And Counting

2 months ago by Eric Loveday 45

Chevrolet Bolt

Over 4.5 million miles driven by the 3,492 Chevrolet Bolt owners in the U.S. works out to an average of 1,309 miles per Bolt.

General Motors has just released some nifty stats on the 3,492 Chevrolet Bolts on U.S. roads.

According to GM:

“Chevrolet reported today that 3,492 Bolt EV owners in the United States have driven a cumulative 4,570,300 miles as of April 2, 2017 since the vehicle went on sale in December 2016. These all-electric miles have resulted in more than 175,000 gallons of fuel saved based on the average EPA-estimated 26 mpg for 2017 vehicles in the U.S.”

Perhaps even more impressive is that Chevrolet has been able to confirm that at least one Bolt owner drove more than 300 miles on a single charge:

“The Bolt EV offers an impressive EPA-estimated 238 miles of range; however, one Bolt EV owner set a new range record by traveling 310 miles on a single charge and on a continuous trip*.”

You’re probably wondering what the asterisk means. Well, it’s nothing shady. Here’s what GM states:

“*Your actual range may vary based on several factors including temperature, terrain and driving technique.”

Here’s some video on a 300-plus mile drive in a Bolt:

Steve Majoros, director of marketing, Chevrolet cars and crossovers, commented on the 4.5-million mile achievement:

“Our early Bolt EV customers are proving the crossover’s functionality, flexibility and long-range capabilities on a daily basis. Chevrolet committed to delivering a game-changing vehicle and we’ve done just that. As we continue our national rollout of the Bolt EV, we’re making electric driving accessible to even more drivers.”

There’s one last bit of info in the press release from GM. It’s on availability and rollout, which remains unchanged since we last reported on the topic.

“Factory deliveries of Bolt EV are currently available in California, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Washington and Virginia. The Bolt EV will be available nationwide by summer 2017.”

Editor’s note:  One can check out recent Bolt EV sales in the US on our Monthly Sales Scorecard, but we also should mention that sales to date (through March 2017) have also been very inventory restrained (often under 15 days)…that is, up until this month (April 2017) when national inventories on hand have quadrupled.

Look for April’s Bolt EV sales result to be much higher than historical norms when they are reported on May 2nd.

Press blast below:

The Chevy Bolt EV will really be racking up the miles shortly, as deeper inventory has finally arrived at dealers this month!

BOLT EV OWNERS DRIVE 4.5 MILLION MILES

One Owner Drives 310 Miles in Single, Continuous Trip

DETROIT — Chevrolet reported today that 3,492 Bolt EV owners in the United States have driven a cumulative 4,570,300 miles as of April 2, 2017 since the vehicle went on sale in December 2016. These all-electric miles have resulted in more than 175,000 gallons of fuel saved based on the average EPA-estimated 26 mpg for 2017 vehicles in the U.S.

The Bolt EV offers an impressive EPA-estimated 238 miles of range; however, one Bolt EV owner set a new range record by traveling 310 miles on a single charge and on a continuous trip*. While this achievement is not typical of average Bolt EV range, some drivers are finding new roads and new range. The average Bolt EV owner drives approximately 53 miles per day, demonstrating the vehicle’s versatility as a daily driver and road trip-ready crossover.

“Our early Bolt EV customers are proving the crossover’s functionality, flexibility and long-range capabilities on a daily basis,” said Steve Majoros, director of marketing, Chevrolet cars and crossovers. “Chevrolet committed to delivering a game-changing vehicle and we’ve done just that. As we continue our national rollout of the Bolt EV, we’re making electric driving accessible to even more drivers.”

Factory deliveries of Bolt EV are currently available in California, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Washington and Virginia. The Bolt EV will be available nationwide by summer 2017.

*Your actual range may vary based on several factors including temperature, terrain and driving technique.

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46 responses to "Chevrolet Bolt Owners Have Driven 4.5 Million Miles And Counting"

  1. David Murray says:

    Hmmm.. But according to my math, they have sold 4,250 Bolt EVs in the USA alone since it went on sale, probably over 5,000 now if you include April sales….

    1. Bacardi says:

      Don’t see how GM could mess up their own stats (you got me, I totally could!) but perhaps it’s PURCHASED vs lease? When a new model comes out, most early adopters literally take ownership by purchasing…The Bolt did not have an attractive lease rate nor basically any advertised lease offer…

  2. fasterthanonecanimagine says:

    Driving 310 miles in the slipstream of a truck is consistent with the official 238 miles range.

    1. SparkEV says:

      After 18K miles, my SparkEV averaged 5.3 mi/kWh. That’s driving local, highway, several 300+ miles per day trips.

      Bolt is rated by EPA to be even more efficient than SparkEV, so 60 kWh would result in over 318 miles if I drove it, and that’s without any hypermiling.

      1. bro1999 says:

        I will attempt to drive across the entire state of Maryland (Mchenry, MD to Ocean City, MD), a 322 mile trek, on a single charge. Will I make it? Stay tuned late June. 🙂

        1. SparkEV says:

          If you’re driving mostly freeway, you won’t make it. Bolt’s 4 mi/kWh at 65-70 MPH may not be as efficient as SparkEV that gets 4.4 mi/kWh at 70 MPH. But Bolt’s city MPGe is more than SparkEV, so that’s the basis of my comment on Bolt’s long range if I drove.

          1. bro1999 says:

            I was able to get ~280 miles on a single charge driving 55-60 mph on the highway for the majority of the trip with 4 people in tow. And that included a 2,500 foot mountain climb.
            I think driving ~5 mph under the speed limit until I hit the eastern shore (which has reduced speeds), I should be able to give it a rub for the money. Especially since I’ll be by myself. And the elevation drops 2,500 feet.

            1. bro1999 says:

              *trip to Shenandoah National Park

            2. SparkEV says:

              Watch your butt. Don’t let others slam it. 🙂

              1. bro1999 says:

                So I re-did my calculations, and it is actually only 314 miles to Ocean City (and more specifically, the 1 CCS station in the Ocean City area). Definitely think I can do it.

                As long as I don’t get run over from behind. Lol

        2. Mark says:

          I can’t wait to hear how you do.

  3. KevinZ says:

    310 miles at what speed?

    1. Ziv says:

      I don’t know about this record run, but most of the records set for AER are done with as few stops as possible and speeds between 25 and 35 mph, depending on the drivers patience and bladder strength.
      I would bet 310 miles of a Bolt was done at a speed close to 30 mph. But a ton of drivers are getting real world 240-250 miles of AER with no hyper-miling techniques so the Bolt is over delivering on the AER promise.

  4. Bruce M says:

    I’ve driven 1500 miles. Mostly I get 4 mi / kWh, for a total range of 240 miles. It’s a 50/50 freeway/city mix.

    1. David Lane says:

      I’m very impressed that the Bolt delivers real world 120 miles freeway, 120 miles city on a charge for you. I would have thought so much freeway driving would reduce range below 240.

      1. Bruce M says:

        Also, this is for “cold” commutes this past month (50-65 degrees). The one warm day at 70 degrees increased mileage by 10%, so it should be 270 miles range with 50/50 mix.

        City mileage is definitely better than freeway 4.3 mi/kWH — steady 70 MPH gives 3.8-4 mi/kWH depending on wind.

  5. Mad says:

    Lets see how much fuel hasn’t been burn just from the Bolt, assuming we are comparing it to a car that gets 30 mpg.

    4,570,300 miles divided by 30 mpg = 152,343 gallons saved.

    That is the equivalent of 17 fuel trucks fully loaded with fuel. That’s a rate of one truck every couple of days. That loss of fuel demand will accelerate.

    1. Steve says:

      The Chevy Bolt – putting gasoline tanker truck drivers out of work since 2017. 😉

      1. DJ says:

        2016 Steve 😉

        1. Steve says:

          Very late 2016. I didn’t think it made much impact for those few weeks.

      2. energymatters says:

        Except where did the “old” car formerly driven go? Is it still on the road? Only a true reduction for the planet if we recycle or destroy the old ICE.

        1. Denis says:

          It will cause a chain reaction of selling/buying of used vehicles. The s******* car in the chain will go to a junk yard for parts or for metal scrap.

        2. fred says:

          It’s talk like that that make normals distrust the whole EV community.

  6. Eric says:

    Are they collecting such precise data via Onstar, or?

    1. Ash09 says:

      Most likely. They do the same thing for the Volt, but I don’t mind it because it gives them some nice metrics to work with, like the fact that the Volt put on more EV miles than the Nissan Leaf did.

      1. Tom says:

        It’s part of how they knew how much range their updated models needed. Vast majority of miles in the new Volts are done on electric. My local dealer in the entire time since the Volt has come out has had one total in stock. i.e. since 2011 exactly 1. And zero of the new ones. And it’s a big dealer. They don’t even stock any of the economy cars either. Basically just trucks and suvs with an occasional group of large and mid sized cars. I’m sure I could order a Volt and they’d get it but I have no confidence they’d be able to fix anything that went wrong.

        1. What is needed is a user built website that reports and tracks such things like this!

          Such as: Dealers that are listed by the OEM as EV Dealers, that have not as yet, really stepped up to the plate; and, those that are ‘All In’, with plenty of EV inventory, sales banners promoting EV’s, &/or local print ads for them, always make sure they are charged and ready for test drives, etc.

          And, those dealers NOT yet listed as EV Dealers, including and noting those of these which have an EV or 2, on the lot!

          Dealers that support EV charging 24×7 should be noted also, particularly those that invite other brand EV’s to charge up their!

          If such a site were created, it really should be something that is supported by the likes of Plug In America, the Electric Auto Association, and maybe even, the States that offer EV rebates, and the Fed EV Tax Credit division!

          It should have seach and filter capabilities, too.

  7. cab says:

    The irony here is that, per the article, the average driver would have had about as many electric miles in a gen II volt with its 53 miles of EV range:

    “The average Bolt EV owner drives approximately 53 miles per day, demonstrating the vehicle’s versatility as a daily driver and road trip-ready crossover.”

    1. energymatters says:

      One nice bit we are seeing that the BOLT actually charges at 7.9 to 8.1 KW when connected to an AC charger capable of that rate. (We run an EV Charger network for apartment building dwellers in San Francisco http://www.electrictrees.com)

      While officially rated at 6.6 it seems the Chevy engineers gave a little present and upped the charge rate a bit.

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        I thought it was officially 7.2kW.

      2. unlucky says:

        Interesting. You’ve piqued my interest. Looks like I’ll trying that myself.

        I usually use a 32A charger, but I can try a friend’s 40A.

    2. JeremyK says:

      You can look at this a couple ways. Yes, the AVERAGE driver’s AVERAGE needs would have been met with a Volt. However, you can also look at this as 50% of the owners would have had to use at least some gas to accomplish their trips in a Volt, whereas no gas was used for those trips in a Bolt.

  8. Dub says:

    This demonstrates just how sad the current CCS (and CHAdeMO) “fast” charging network is. 70% in 1 hour? I’m looking forward to much much higher speeds in the next generation of charging infrastructure, which should be right around the corner.

  9. And, right here, today, is an article with Hyundai all happy about their FCV, making the 2 Million Mile mark:

    http://insideevs.com/hyundai-tucson-fuel-cell-suv-drivers-crack-past-2-million-miles-driven/

    “Hyundai has delivered more than 140 Tucson Fuel Cell crossovers since its introduction as the first mass-produced fuel cell in the U.S. market in 2014.”

    Sad, really! Sad that they think it is such a winner! Sad that they think it competitive when they have delivered just 140 since 2014, or about 2-3 days of Average Rate Bolt EV sales!

    How will it ever compete with the coming Model Y, which will likely get produced at a higher rate than the Tesla Model 3, which is planning and targeting a first week production rate of 1,000 units!

    1. Sad compared to sales of the first Tesla, the Roadster, even, from a totally unknown company, that was barely discovered, and is still, over 10 years later, considered a ‘Beautique’ car maker, even though it made 25,000 vehicles in Q1, 2017!

  10. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Isn’t it way faster than LEAF did in the US back in 2011?

  11. Warren says:

    I am sooo looking forward to the April sales numbers. Electrek is spinning this story, again, as slow rollout compliance car.

    2017 plugins within 75 miles of central Virginia today:

    163 Bolts
    118 Ford Energi
    100 Volts
    31 Leaf
    24 Prius Prime
    8 BMW i3 Rex
    2 Ford Focus

    Some compliance car!

    1. David Murray says:

      Indeed.. Both the Prius Prime, Bolt EV, and Volt have my curiosity peaked as to how their sales are going. The Focus EV is also a curiosity too… since I think the new model is much more competitive and looks like it might finally break out into a decent selling vehicle.

      1. Warren says:

        Here in central Virginia, Ford has done nothing to promote the Focus. I have yet to see one, although I have spotted about as many Energi’s as BMW i3’s. I have seen several Prius Primes already and, of course, lots of Leafs. Interestingly, I have seen almost as many Teslas as Leafs, and often far from cities.

        Interesting that dealers only have the Rex version now. They were pretty evenly stocked at the beginning.

      2. Baker says:

        Also the Pacifica, once inventory builds up. Very interested to see how the foray into a new class of vehicle goes.

    2. Bacardi says:

      About 2K sales is what most expect…Imagine if they could get 200 miles of range for the same MSRP $37495 in an FWD Equinox with optional AWD? EASY 100K sales year…

      1. Warren says:

        They need to do 2K every month from here on out, and 3K in August and December. The Leaf broke 3K four months in 2014, and never again. Volt broke 3K once in 2013, and once in 2016.

    3. bro1999 says:

      Plus GM gets *0* CARB credits for sales to VA residents.

      But the TSLA fanbois will still call it a compliance car. Like electrek. Lol

      1. Warren says:

        Yeah. I think Virginia is a perfect test case for the new crop of EVs. A purple state, with moderate weather, relatively compact, with several college towns, a big city right in the middle, and DC suburbs. In the last year, we have actually gotten a few DCFC station along the major highways, and in large towns. A Bolt is totally practical here, without distorting perks for ownership.

      2. ModernMarvelFan says:

        Electrek is basically Tesla fan boi club publication.

        Their editors/writers openly disclose that they own TSLA stocks. So, it is biased “stock pumping site” for sure.

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