Canada Getting Serious With Big EV Incentive Plan

2 weeks ago by Sebastian Blanco 30

Chevy Bolt EV kilometer range

Big deals could be coming up North.

Electric vehicle sales in Canada continue to improve, with the Chevrolet Volt leading the way. Last week, the national government announced a comprehensive plan to, “increase the number of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVS) on Canadian roads by 2018.” The gist is that since the transportation sector is responsible fro almost a quarter of the emissions generated in Canada, shifting as many vehicles as possible over to plug-in electric or hydrogen power to, “to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the light-duty vehicle sector.”

It’s not just the Canadian federal government that’s taking a new pro-EV stance. The province of Quebec, for example, recently announced that it would incentivize the sale of used EVs, including used Nissan Leafs from the U.S. The whole country is using a plan called Transportation 2030, that wants to make travel for everyone easier, safer, and greener. Read more on that here.

Press Release:

Government of Canada to develop a national Zero-Emissions Vehicle Strategy by 2018

MONTREAL, May 26, 2017 /CNW/ – Today, the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport and the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, announced that the Government of Canada is moving forward with provincial and territorial partners, industry and stakeholders, to develop a national strategy to increase the number of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVS) on Canadian roads by 2018.

Transportation accounts for about 24 percent of Canada’s emissions, mostly from cars and trucks. ZEVs which include battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, offer the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the light-duty vehicle sector. Canada is also uniquely placed to take advantage of the opportunities associated with the advanced technology driving this evolution – including innovation, R&D and talent – to create high quality middle class jobs.

Under the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change, federal, provincial and territorial governments committed to work with industry and stakeholders to develop a Canada-wide ZEV strategy by 2018. This strategy will be ambitious and will build on existing initiatives, such as light-duty vehicle regulations, provincial ZEV programs, and Canadian innovation superclusters, to help meet our 2030 greenhouse gas emissions reduction target and realize our potential as a global leader in innovation and the clean economy.

To advance the strategy, a national Advisory Group has been established to contribute to developing options for addressing the key barriers for greater deployment of these technologies in five areas: vehicle supply, cost and benefits of ownership, infrastructure readiness, public awareness, and clean growth and clean jobs.  The Advisory Group includes representatives from governments, industry, consumer and non-government organizations and academia.

The Government of Canada has made an important start in supporting further deployment of ZEVs by providing $62.5 million through Budget 2016 and an additional $120 million through Budget 2017 for Natural Resources Canada to deploy infrastructure for electric vehicle charging and refuelling stations for alternative fuel such as natural gas and hydrogen, as well as to support technology demonstration projects. Investments like this will make it easier for Canadian ZEV drivers to travel farther, enabling them to do their part to address our climate change challenge.

Quotes

“We understand Canadians’ concerns about the environment and are developing an aggressive strategy to tackle climate change by taking actions to reduce greenhouse gases and air pollution. By putting more zero emission vehicles on the road, we are investing in the future of cleaner transportation for all Canadians.”

Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

“We have an opportunity to have a major impact on the development of clean energy and clean transportation. Canada is home to countless innovative firms and talent that are already shaping the automotive technologies of the future. This strategy provides an important opportunity to create highly skilled middle class jobs, reduce carbon emissions and create healthier communities.”

Navdeep Bains
Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

“Developing a national strategy on zero-emission vehicles is one more way Canada can lead the global transition to the low-carbon economy while creating good jobs and giving Canadians more choices the next time they need to buy a vehicle.”

Jim Carr
Minister of Natural Resources

“This is a time of laying the groundwork for the 21st-century society we want. As a government, we are putting forward a broad, thoughtful and modern agenda. New measures to improve efficiency across the transportation sector, as well as to encourage zero-emission vehicles, will complement carbon pricing and take advantage of a low-carbon electricity grid.”

Catherine McKenna
Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Quick Facts

In 2015, light-duty vehicle emissions accounted for approximately 50 percent of Canada’s transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions, and 12 percent of the country’s total emissions
Battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid vehicles, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles offer the potential for important reductions in light-duty vehicle emissions as they have very little or no tailpipe emissions compared with conventional vehicles.

Source: Transport Canada via HybridCars

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30 responses to "Canada Getting Serious With Big EV Incentive Plan"

  1. Paul K says:

    Almost 200 million over 2 years sounds like a lot of money. More fuel for the detractors objecting to “their” tax dollars going to pay for “my” car. However, this pales in comparison with the 3 BILLION Canada spent last year in grants and subsidies to the fossil fuel industries. It’s a start.

    1. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

      +1

    2. Leo says:

      The people that are buying electric and get a Canadian refund do they not pay taxes too? Maybe they are just getting some of there tax money back from the government?

    3. AlphaEdge says:

      There is no question, the gov’t has to get in and help the EV adoption rate, or it will not take off here.

      In the long run, it’s good policy, as it will lead to clean air (thus savings in health care), and lower transportation costs for Canadians, who can use those savings in other parts of the economy.

  2. F150 Brian says:

    I still don’t understand why cars are the focus. Only 12% of emissions are from “light duty” vehicles, which include full size picks and monster SUVs.

    Development of new small electric cars seems to be the path of least resistance but it’s not really making much difference given their emissions are so small compared to the average light duty vehicle.

    And while looking for sources of emissions, it would be easier and more effective to convert oil and gas furnaces over to electric. You’d have to drive 200,000+ Km per year in a small car to have equivalent CO2 emmissions from an average Canadian house.

    Also, oil furnaces burn dirty fuel with zero emissions control devices, so the non-CO2 components are thousands of time worse than a new car.

    1. MEL4EV says:

      Fossil fuels are at least good for generating heat- not so good for motive power as so much is wasted as heat!

    2. AlphaEdge says:

      F150 Brian > it would be easier and more effective to convert oil and gas furnaces over to electric

      Joke of the day. Obviously not aware of the Ontario’s gov’t actions in the electric sector. Crazy high prices, and a lot of it driven by their green push. Who can afford what you’re suggesting?

      Even here in BC, with some of the lowest electric rates in North America, and with a mild climate compared to the rest of Canada, many homes are heated with natural gas, and recently their was articles in the paper about people being upset with their very high hydro bills in the winter months, that BC Hydro offers people up to 6 months to pay those bills off.

      1. Neromanceres says:

        When he talks about converting furnaces to electric I don’t think he means electric resistance heat. He is likely referring to air-source heat pumps and ground source heat pumps (geothermal).

        Air-source heat pumps are cost comparable to natural gas even in Ontario. Ground source is cheaper to run but the up front capitol costs are high.

    3. zzzzzzzzzz says:

      >F150 Brian

      Yes dealing with furnaces and thermal insulation would make much more sense, but where is all the buzz and high tech toy joy talking about furnaces?

      You are not going to pull your furnace around the block and brag to all the neighbors and gold diggers “Look at me! I paid $100,000 for my super-green super-furnace and it heats up my house up to 100*F in 2.5 seconds!”. So furnaces must wait for better times.

  3. Eco says:

    It’s about time! Thanks to former Harper (Conservative) gov’t Canada was in denial over the disastrous health, environmental and climate effects of fossil fuels. Now we have a new (Liberal) gov’t led by Justin Trudeau that finally gets it … we need to stop fossil fuel emissions now … ICE’s are killing us!

    1. AlphaEdge says:

      Liberal fans in denial. He approved that oil pipeline, and how many electron promises has he broken?

      Balance budget by 2019? What a joke. Minus $30 Billion this year, and expected minus $18 Billion by 2019.

      Yeah, but we got pot for the kiddies/hedonists. What a responsible adult he is. But don’t worry, the Liberals have no shortage of money for mental health services in the future.

      1. Neromanceres says:

        Actually other than election reform (which I’m not happy about) I can’t think of any other promises he has broken. He never promised to balance the budget. He did promise not to increase the debt to GDP ratio. In fact our debt to GDP has decreased. Also he never promised to block oil pipelines. Only that their projects would be reviewed.

        1. AlphaEdge says:

          Took me two seconds of searching to find it:

          > Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is backing away from a campaign vow to balance the public books before the end of his government’s four-year mandate — a pledge that was central to the Liberal election platform.

          Also promised to keep deficit under $10 Billion.

          Anything more you want to deny?

  4. Paul K says:

    Strictly from an emissions standpoint you make a good argument. There are other factors. My house has electric heat and it’s about 3X as expensive as natural gas. It would take one hell of an unpalatable carbon tax to close that gap.

    However, electric cars can benefit both the grid and local economy. At night Ontario Hydro has often sold power below cost to NY state. More cars charging at night would help with this. As Ontario is not a petro state, more $$$ stay in province with electric cars.

    And finally, electricity doesn’t leak out of power lines and poison the water table. And no train carrying electricity is going to derail and burn people to death.

    1. Neromanceres says:

      Have you looked into installing an air source heat pump? It’s 3 times more efficient than regular electric heat. I’m using a Mitsubishi Zuba Central unit and have been very happy with it.

      1. Paul K says:

        I have thought about that as well as switching to gas. The problem with air source heat pumps is that when it gets really frigging cold they have to work hard. My Leaf heat pump consumes 3500 watts at minus 20C but only around 1500W at 0C. I try not to use it much but when it’s raining or snowing the windows will fog up.

        1. msrural says:

          Ground source heat pump paired with solar (if one has that option) is the ideal combination.

  5. SparkEV says:

    12% (closer to 15% actually) is green house gas emissions. For real poison gas, it’s closer to 100% (or 80% depending on location) in (sub)urban areas. If you look around, there’s not many things spewing poison gas other than cars.

    Another to consider is that while EPA limits the poison gas on city average, there’s no restriction on local. If you happen to live next to busy freeway, poison gas level could be many times EPA limits.

    1. SparkEV says:

      Apparently, you can’t reply to F150 Brian, but above was meant as reply to him.

    2. AlphaEdge says:

      > “If you look around, there’s not many things spewing poison gas other than cars.”

      Walk down any side walk in our cities, and what are you breathing, Poisonous noxious fumes that just came out a tail pipe a few feet from you.

      One day humanity will look back and shake their head, that we tolerated that.

      Those fumes are largely invisible, but under certain lighting conditions, they can be seen (under some summer sunsets shows it), and it’s scary, the crap that’s blowing over the sidewalk.

      Every day I come home, I wash my hands, and then I wash all the pollution off my face. If I took a tissue, and wiped my forehead, many times it will show up as grey dirt on the tissue.

      1. SparkEV says:

        Something else to note is riding bicycles or running. Either I’m very unlucky, or I seem to get dumped with really smelly fumes whenever I ride the bicycle or run!

      2. Mark.ca says:

        Not long ago there was a big debate whatever lead in gasoline is poisoning the environment…how many years that lasted before action was taken? …we rarely learn from our past mistakes.

  6. Ocean Railroader says:

    I hope they use the 60 million dollars to build a Trans Canada DC quick charging system vs poring the money into giving people checks to by a car.

    The number of Quick Chargers on plug share around Toronto seems to have grown quite fast over the last six months compared to years of slow growth.

    If the 60 million is pored into Quick chargers like the 20 million was Canada will most likely have more chargers then the United States by the time it’s over.

    1. menorman says:

      As long as Big Hydrogen doesn’t catch wind of the plans and demand part of the pie.

      1. AlphaEdge says:

        You did not read it:

        > by providing $62.5 million through Budget 2016 and an additional $120 million through Budget 2017 for Natural Resources Canada to deploy infrastructure for electric vehicle charging and refuelling stations for alternative fuel such as natural gas and hydrogen,

        Notice, it end with the word hydrogen?

        1. Ocean Railroader says:

          My biggest fear too is that the Government will make the mistake of spending five million dollars each to build four hydrogen stations. That can only fuel six to ten cars a day.

          In terms of natural gas I think natural gas powered cars and trucks are more common than hydrogen. But it will most likely cost at least 600,000 to three million dollars to build a natural gas station.

          I simply wish that they would add DC quick chargers to all their rest areas and visitors centers in Canada.

          It would be neat to see a system of DC quick chargers go to the Alaska boarder from Toronto.

          1. AlphaEdge says:

            Yup, that would not surprise me.

            I’m fully expecting lots of waste, and poor efficiency to this whole plan.

          2. zzzzzzzzzz says:

            Ocean Railroader:
            > “My biggest fear too is that the Government will make the mistake of spending five million dollars each to build four hydrogen stations. That can only fuel six to ten cars a day.”

            They already ordered 2 stations from Hydrogenics in Toronto area. Cost to government was 1.6 mln CAD total (1.19 mln USD). I don’t know the capacity, but 6-10 car/day retail stations are not being built for years. It is more likely to be hundreds of kg/day and 3 minutes for 0-100% as elsewhere. Good luck matching this cost per throughput, scalability and usability in -30 Celcius weather 😉 Sure all this doesn’t matter for a dedicated city commuter car that can be charged at home, but it would be silly to suggest some enthusiast level road chargers as the only possible way to spend funds.

            nrcan.gc.ca/energy/alternative-fuels/fuel-facts/ecoenergy/18397

            1. Al S says:

              Where are they achieving 0% -100% in real-life conditions and what is the downtime between sessions?

              Besides the cost to the government, how much is the other cost and who is paying?

              What will the end user pay for enough hydrogen to drive 100 km?

              Where is the hydrogen being produced and how will it be delivered to the stations?

              1. zzzzzzzzzz says:

                Al S:

                >Where are they achieving 0% -100% in real-life conditions and what is the downtime between sessions?

                Anywhere with Type “A” (i.e. recent retail standard) dispensers. In California for example.
                E.g. 100 kg/3 hour capacity like for CAR-200 would not allow more than 5-6 minutes per car. It varies between stations, but usually you would need more than couple cars in line to introduce some delay. It is part of project requirements for California funding and it real life performance is monitored.

                > Besides the cost to the government, how much is the other cost and who is paying?

                I would assume private party. As I have posted the link that Canada government pays 50%.

                > What will the end user pay for enough hydrogen to drive 100 km?

                I don’t know. End users pay $0.00/kg in California. For everybody else prices at retail pump start from $9.99/kg, expected to drop to some $5 when more volume is reached.

                > Where is the hydrogen being produced and how will it be delivered to the stations?

                There are many different options to choose from.
                You should ask Hydrogenics which one they will use, but it is their business after all.

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