California Governor Jerry Brown Signs Package Of Bills Aimed At Increasing Electric Car Uptake

3 years ago by Eric Loveday 13

Green HOV Sticker - Image Courtesy of Jackson Kuo

Green HOV Sticker – Image Courtesy of Jackson Kuo

California Governor Jerry Brown signed a package of bills over the weekend aimed at increasing the state’s electric car uptake.

The measures, part of the Charge Ahead California Initiative, set a 2023 goal of 1 million zero-emission vehicles and near-zero-emission vehicles on the roads in California.

Charge Ahead California Looks To See 1 Million Plug-Ins On The Road Within 10 Years

Charge Ahead California Looks To See 1 Million Plug-Ins On The Road Within 10 Years

As the Los Angeles Times reports:

“California has more electric vehicles on its roads than anywhere else, helping us fight pollution in our state and this legislation will further that effort,” Jim Evans, a spokesman for Brown, said Sunday.

The measure directs the state Air Resources Board to draft a financial plan to meet the goal of putting 1 million vehicles on the road while making sure that disadvantaged communities can participate.

The board will change its clean-vehicle rebate program to provide an extra credit for low-income drivers who wish to purchase or lease an electric car. It also will provide assistance to car-sharing programs in low-income neighborhoods and install electric-vehicle charging stations in apartment buildings in those communities.

A quick breakdown of the measures signed by Brown is as follows:

AB 1721: Grants free or reduced-rates in high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes to clean air vehicles.
AB 2013: Increases to 70,000 the number of advanced technology partial zero-emission vehicles that may be allowed in high-occupancy vehicle lanes, regardless of occupancy level.
AB 2090: Repeals the level of service requirements on HOT lanes for the San Diego Association of Governments and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, and directs them to work with the California Department of Transportation to develop appropriate performance measures.
AB 2565: Requires commercial and residential property owners to approve installation of an electric vehicle charging station by renters, so long as the station meets requirements.
SB 1275: Creates the Charge Ahead California Initiative, which provides incentives to increase the availability of zero emission vehicles in low-income communities.
SB 1298: Makes the pilot projects for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s operation of HOT lanes on State Highway Routes 10 and 110 permanent.

Press Release Below

Governor Brown Signs Electric Vehicle Legislation

9-21-2014

SACRAMENTO – Capping off National Drive Electric Week, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today signed half a dozen bills to strengthen California’s best-in-the-nation electric vehicle market.

The Governor signed the following bills today:

– AB 1721 by Assemblymember Eric F. Linder (R-Corona): Grants free or reduced-rates in high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes to clean air vehicles.
– AB 2013 by Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance): Increases to 70,000 the number of advanced technology partial zero-emission vehicles that may be allowed in high-occupancy vehicle lanes, regardless of occupancy level.
– AB 2090 by Assemblymember Paul Fong (D-San Jose): Repeals the level of service requirements on HOT lanes for the San Diego Association of Governments and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, and directs them to work with the California Department of Transportation to develop appropriate performance measures.
– AB 2565 by Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance): Requires commercial and residential property owners to approve installation of an electric vehicle charging station by renters, so long as the station meets requirements.
– SB 1275 by Senator Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles): Creates the Charge Ahead California Initiative, which provides incentives to increase the availability of zero emission vehicles in low-income communities.
– SB 1298 by Senator Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina): Makes the pilot projects for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s operation of HOT lanes on State Highway Routes 10 and 110 permanent.

This action builds on the state’s efforts to help California’s electric vehicle market grow, including legislation Governor Brown signed last year and the executive order he issued in 2012 to establish a target of 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles on the road in California by 2025 and a number of other long-term goals.

California accounts for 40 percent of the nation’s plug-in electric vehicle sales and earlier this month, surpassed 100,000 plug-in electric vehicles sold.

National Drive Electric Week is a nationwide celebration of all-electric and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles and includes more than a dozen events across California between September 15th and 21st.

Source: LA Times

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13 responses to "California Governor Jerry Brown Signs Package Of Bills Aimed At Increasing Electric Car Uptake"

  1. pjwood says:

    I noticed Tesla recently added LA’s (Louisiana’s) $13,600 state rebate, on their build (for cash) pricing. I don’t think this has been well understood, and am curious of others take:

    http://www.revenue.louisiana.gov/forms/lawspolicies/2012_12RevenueRule.pdf

    It looks like the original state rate was $3,000, but upon reading the text of the legislation they link to, it states buyers who are willing to calculate the cost of electric components can file a rebate for a substantial amount ($9,600 / 60kwh, $13,600 / 85kwh) of their value.

    What will $21,000 in state and federal rebates do, if not create a bigger pipeline of used, for-profit sales?

  2. Emc2 says:

    Jay, in March 2012 Governor Brown signed an executive order setting the goal of 1.5 million zero emission cars. Do you know if this new goal supersedes the 2012 goal, or California now has two goals?

    The latter means 500,000 new PEV sales between 2023 and 2025!

    1. pjwood says:

      CA, is a member to the multi-state memorandum of understanding (MOU), to put 3.3mm electrics on the roads, by 2025. That may be different from their self-contained legislation. I believe their MOU target contribution is the 1.5mm, again, by 2025.

    2. California’s “ZEV Action Plan” callers for upto 1 million ZEVs on California roads by 2020 and 1.5 million ZEVs by 2025. (see page 8)
      http://opr.ca.gov/docs/Governor's_Office_ZEV_Action_Plan_(02-13).pdf

      This month California passed 100,000 PEVs registered in the state. A number that CARB had not projected (two years ago) to occur until 2017. The current PEV sales trend makes it highly likely California will have 200,000 PEVs by 2016. Demand is there … just a mater f supply keeping up.

      The 2023 is a new number presented associated with the bills and language presented in the most recent session. 2023 is likely a political compermise and a date that 1 million is surely to be exceeded.

      The actual number of PEVs will be more influenced by Nissan, Tesla, and others introducing high-volume PEVs (ie: models with production of 100,000+ per year).

    3. liberty says:

      I would bet that the new more doable goal revises the old goal. Just pulled it up, http://gov.ca.gov/news.php?id=17463
      1.5 Million ZEVs seem to count on a lot of fuel cells and no PHEVs. That isn’t the mix California is getting, or is likely to get. 1 million bev, phevs, and fcevs sounds a lot more doable by 2023.

  3. SeattleTeslaGuy says:

    The only one that look reasonable is 2565 which will, in theory, make it easier to get chargers in apartments and rental houses. Still puts the burden on the renters, though.

    The HOV lanes sticker thing is a very short term fix and there is some evidence that it is increasing anti-EV attitudes.

    1. Assaf says:

      Yeah, I think in CA now the focus should be on executive and public-private action to get a viable multi-standard QC network up and down the state.

      In particular, those lingering coverage gaps in northern CA and between the LA and Bay Area metro regions, are a shame.

      With a state so rich and having so many BEVs…. what are they waiting for?

      1. Mike I says:

        Most entities don’t believe it will make a difference. Nissan, for example, has no interest at all in helping build out DCFC on the 101 corridor between San Jose and Santa Barbara. The CEC (Energy Commission) has already recommended a grant for approval to build out corridor charging on Hwy 99 and I-5 between Sacramento and the LA Basin. It just hasn’t come before the Commission for final funding. The major corridor that is not getting any love is I-5 between Sacramento and the Oregon border.

    2. Stimpacker says:

      +1

      There are plenty of ways to promote EV’s. HOV lane stickers may backfire. The EV’s of today (perhaps excluding Teslas) are not well suited for travelling at the typical speeds found on California’s HOV lanes (70mph+).

      It is very annoying to see Prius’ and Leafs going at 55-60mph. Heck sometimes they even go slower than traffic in non HOV lanes!!!

      I firmly believe that congestion is best reduced when one drives at the speed of traffic (e.g. move like electrons) instead of driving too fast or too slow as you see fit.

    3. io says:

      “there is some evidence that…”
      Care to share it with us?

      Also, the extra HOV lane allocation (AB 2013) is for “partial zero-emission” vehicles, aka plug-in hybrids, which qualify for green stickers. EVs get white ones instead, the number of which aren’t limited.

  4. Anon says:

    Go Brown! Go Sutter!

    Corgi’s like BEVs.

    http://gov.ca.gov/s_firstdog.php

  5. George B says:

    About time! The extended allocation of 55,000 HOV decals was about to run out very soon. The California DMV has issued close to 15,000 stickers between July 1 and September 20. Grab them while they last! There won’t be another new allocation.

  6. Thanh Lim says:

    I’m not fond of the permanent HOT lanes for the 110 and 10. It seems like such a boondoggle, and really, they are simply Lexus Lanes.

    It’s not right, and it just means the rich get richer.

    Also, why not build these “Lexus Lanes”, right onto the Santa Monica freeway? It would change what people drive almost immediately.