Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid Priced At $76,090, Will Go On Sale In Spring 2017 With 30 Miles Of Electric Range

5 months ago by Eric Loveday 60

The Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid goes on sale in North America in spring of 2017. The CT6 Plug-In offers over 400 miles of combine driving range, a full EV range of an estimated 30 miles and a zero to 60 mph time of 5.2 seconds.

The Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid goes on sale in North America in spring of 2017. The CT6 Plug-In offers over 400 miles of combine driving range, a full EV range of an estimated 30 miles and a zero to 60 mph time of 5.2 seconds.

Cadillac has just announced that its CT6 Plug In Hybrid will go on sale in the U.S. in Spring 2017 from a starting price-point of $76, 090 (including dst)

With its launch just months away, Cadillac decided to spill most all of the details now at the Los Angeles Auto Show. Those details include price, range, horsepower, torque and more.

  • Total range: More than 400 miles
  • Battery: 18.4 kWh
  • Electric range: 30 miles
  • Horsepower: 335
  • Torque: 432 pound-feet
  • MPGe: 65
The Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid

The Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid

According to Cadillac the plug-in hybrid version of the CT6 is the most powerful CT6 offered. Perhaps that’s one reason its the priciest CT6 too. Performance breaks down like this:

“The CT6 Plug-In Hybrid combines an all-new rear wheel drive electric variable transmission to provide the smooth, powerful acceleration expected from a driver’s car. The two-motor EVT system combines with the 2.0-liter turbocharged four- cylinder gas engine to produce an estimated total system power of 335 hp (250 kW) and 432 lb-ft (586 Nm) of torque. This helps propel the vehicle from a zero to 60 mph in an estimated 5.2 seconds.”

Not Tesla territory, but not too shabby.

Cadillac CT6 PHEV

Cadillac CT6 PHEV

Cadillac CT6 Rear Seating

Cadillac CT6 Rear Seating

As for the all-important electric-side of the equation, Cadillac is quick to point out that the CT6 PHEV doesn’t disappoint. It’s capable of highway speeds under electric power alone.

“Each electric motor produces 100 hp (74.5 kW) of power. On electric power only, the car is capable of approximately 30 miles of driving range and a top speed of 78 mph, with the additional power of the engine adding hundreds of miles of total range and a top speed of 150 mph on a track.”

Cadillac says that the equipment for the PHEV version is comparable to the CT6 Premium Luxury trim level, which starts at $64,590 with the 3.6-liter V6, and $68,590 with the twin-turbo V6.

The Cadillac CT6 PHEV Cutaway - literally

The Cadillac CT6 PHEV Cutaway – literally

Another look at the 18.4 kWh battery's location in the trunk

Another look at the 18.4 kWh battery’s location in the trunk

Here’s the automaker’s statement on that (plus more operational videos below):

The CT6 Plug-In Hybrid launches in North America in the spring of 2017, starting in the U.S. at $75,095 plus a $995 destination freight charge before any applicable electric vehicle tax incentives. In the U.S. market, the CT6 Plug-In Hybrid will be offered as its own unique package within the CT6 product line, with pricing and equipment comparable to the existing Premium Luxury model (second highest within in the model range). The Plug-In model includes numerous optional equipment as standard, such as a Rear Seat Infotainment system, Enhanced Night Vision and Rear Camera mirror.

Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid

Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid

Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen adds:

“The CT6 is a technological showcase throughout, and by far the lightest car in its class, making it an ideal platform for electrification. In the CT6, Cadillac presents a new formula for prestige luxury. The advanced Plug-In Hybrid system is a key addition, providing a combination of exceptional fuel economy, crisp acceleration and strong electric-driving range.”

You’ll find a few more details, as well as additional photos, in the press release section below:

Cadillac CT6 PHEV

Cadillac CT6 PHEV

2017 Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid on sale in spring 2017, offering an estimated 400-plus miles of total range
2016-11-15

Expected rating of 65 MPGe
Exhilarating performance: 0-60 mph in 5.2 seconds
NEW YORK – Cadillac today announced the first-ever 2017 CT6 Plug-In Hybrid prestige sedan will go on sale in the spring of 2017, with a total driving range of more than 400 miles.

Advanced plug-in hybrid technology enables the luxury sedan to reward drivers with environmentally conscious driving without compromising on performance. The CT6 Plug-In Hybrid system is designed to provide responsive, all-electric driving for most daily commutes, while maximizing fuel efficiency by providing blended power from the engine and battery at higher speeds and higher loads.

All-electric range for the CT6 Plug-In Hybrid is an estimated 30 miles. However, the car’s combination of efficient engine and battery power enables drivers the freedom of more than 400 miles of total driving range, with no requirement to find charging stations along the way. Thanks to the advanced propulsion system, the CT6 Plug-In Hybrid removes all range anxiety for our customers.

Cadillac CT6 PHEV

Cadillac CT6 PHEV

The CT6 is a technological showcase throughout, and by far the lightest car in its class, making it an ideal platform for electrification,” said Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen. “In the CT6, Cadillac presents a new formula for prestige luxury. The advanced Plug-In Hybrid system is a key addition, providing a combination of exceptional fuel economy, crisp acceleration and strong electric-driving range.”

Cadillac’s prestige plug-in hybrid entry achieves the same zero to 60 mph performance as its V6-powered competitors, while achieving roughly twice the full EV range and MPGe figures.

The CT6 Plug-In Hybrid is expected to have fuel economy estimated at 65 MPGe. Miles per gallon equivalence – MPGe – compares energy consumption of plug-in electric vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles with the fuel economy of conventional internal combustion vehicles in miles per U.S. gallon.

Cadillac CT^ PHEV

Cadillac CT^ PHEV

The CT6 Plug-In Hybrid combines an all-new rear wheel drive electric variable transmission to provide the smooth, powerful acceleration expected from a driver’s car. The two-motor EVT system combines with the 2.0-liter turbocharged four- cylinder gas engine to produce an estimated total system power of 335 hp (250 kW) and 432 lb-ft (586 Nm) of torque. This helps propel the vehicle from a zero to 60 mph in an estimated 5.2 seconds.

Each electric motor produces 100 hp (74.5 kW) of power. On electric power only, the car is capable of approximately 30 miles of driving range and a top speed of 78 mph, with the additional power of the engine adding hundreds of miles of total range and a top speed of 150 mph on a track.

The CT6 Plug-In Hybrid launches in North America in the spring of 2017, starting in the U.S. at $75,095 plus a $995 destination freight charge before any applicable electric vehicle tax incentives. In the U.S. market, the CT6 Plug-In Hybrid will be offered as its own unique package within the CT6 product line, with pricing and equipment comparable to the existing Premium Luxury model (second highest within in the model range). The Plug-In model includes numerous optional equipment as standard, such as a Rear Seat Infotainment system, Enhanced Night Vision and Rear Camera mirror.

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61 responses to "Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid Priced At $76,090, Will Go On Sale In Spring 2017 With 30 Miles Of Electric Range"

  1. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Pricey. But it got more EV range than the comparable European Luxury PHEVs designed for compliance.

    1. floydboy says:

      True.

    2. no comment says:

      it’s actually not a bad price; it’s $20,000 less than a b#@z-o s-class, offers superior phev technology and offers comparable performance. china is the biggest market for the b#@z-o s-class and (i believe) cadillac, so the cts might compete well there.

      as much of an s-class addict as i am, i have to say that the cts is certainly worth investigating as an alternative.

    3. jimijonjack says:

      For that kind of money ,you can buy a Tesla ‘S” With all the free charging infrastructure Included.. Why buy this G00FY Looking Double Trouble Unreliable Stinky Cadillac That you gotta Gas Up ???? It make ZER0 Sense At this Price ./.

      1. Big Al says:

        This is funny. You want “unreliable?” Get a Tesla. Then spend an hour “filling the tank” as you cross the country. Ridiculous to spend $100k+ on a car that you can’t fill up in seven minutesi at every street corner.

  2. bro1999 says:

    “Enhanced night vision”….wonder what that is exactly?

    1. DonC says:

      Infrared display.

  3. Stuart22 says:

    Contrary to the article, 5.2 seconds to 60 does put it in the performance ballpark with the Model S 60 which I think takes 5.5 seconds to 60, but costs in the high $60k range – not too far below this Caddy.

    And I’ll guess the Caddy will be more luxuriously appointed and offer some pretty cool things like 4WS. For those who don’t care to rely on Superchargers on long trips, it is more compelling PHEV than the top-line e-sedans from Germany.

    1. georgeS says:

      @Stuart
      It’s definitely a nice power train. I just don’t like the huge “gas car” grill. The car screams gas burner for rich guys. I like the ELR but this thing is just too gaudy.

      DonC might like it though:)

      1. Stuart22 says:

        Well, looks are too subjective to argue about, but I have to say its styling has grown on me. It doesn’t break new ground, but I think its looks pretty clean and simple, one of the less puzzling creations to come out of Cadillac’s Art & Science school of styling.

        The grille? Gaudy? Looks like a lot of grilles – a rectangle with a logo in the middle. Hey! Its gas engine needs a grille, no?

        Were I in the market for a big luxury sedan, I’d give it a serious look. Only thing is, when I look at it, I see myself riding in the back seat rather than seated behind the wheel…

        1. wavelet says:

          Stuart, you’re looking at it the wrong way. This a car for the Chinese market, made in China and IIRC, designed in China. According to the stories on InsideEVs, GM wasn’t even sure they’d import it into the US initially.

          1. Stuart22 says:

            Taking what the wrong way? Not sure what you mean. ICE-only CT6s manufacturing occurs in the USA, the PHEV CT6 does not.

            If not for the China market, the PHEV CT6 probably would never exist – stateside estimated sales would not have been enough. It is ironic that we have China to thank for America’s gain, here.

    2. Rob Stark says:

      I don’t care to rely on gasoline stations when on long trips.

  4. David Murray says:

    I wonder what size the battery pack is. I had originally heard it would be the same KWH as the Volt. If so, that means this thing is horribly inefficient by comparison if it goes 30 miles on a charge.

    1. Jay Cole says:

      Sorry David, I can add in some of that info (and maybe a pic or two of the battery placement into the story) – its 18.4 kWh

    2. DonC says:

      Same pack. Yes, interesting how much less range it has. But the gearing to totally different and things like 19″ wheels don’t help.

      1. floydboy says:

        Likely a much heavier car than the Volt too.

    3. Taser54 says:

      Calling it horribly inefficient fails to consider that the system is tuned for performance and it’s a much larger car than a Volt.

      1. Just_Chris says:

        Calling it horribly inefficient is completely accurate when comparing it to the volt or a Tesla. Compared to a regular CT6 this is a dream.

        IMO, this is a fine example of why we need to step up legislation around vehicle emissions, by 2020 this is what a gas guzzler should look like and the regular CT6 should be banned – at least at this price point.

      2. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

        I don’t get it; only 65 MPGe? If it can go 30 miles in all electric mode, then the entire EPA mileage test will be performed in all electric mode. Although not tuned for performance, the Prius Prime with a 25 mile AER can complete the entire EPA mileage test without the ICE kicking on, and it gets 133 MPGe. That’s a shade over 2X as efficient as the CT6 PHEV. The only EV with a worse MPGe rating that completes the EPA mileage test in all-electric mode is the 2012-2014 BYD e6, which had a paltry 62 or 63 MPGe depending on model year.

        http://fueleconomy.gov/m/m.do?action=vehicles&id=33383

        http://fueleconomy.gov/m/m.do?action=vehicles&id=34859

        1. Bill Howland says:

          I’d take a ‘wait and see’ attitude. 30 miles may mean while agressive driving, but EPA comparisons are only fair between vehicles if they are all driven exactly the same way.

          If the car does indeed get lousy mileage, they’ve spent a huge engineering cost for little benefit.

          The entirely redesigne 2-100 hp motors, and 3 planetary gear boxes with 5 clutches (which they can probably get 20 different operating modes out of) were obviously an attempt to get simultaneous performance and efficiency at the same time. So, I don’t believe the 30 AER figure if driven modestly.

          1. JakeY says:

            I would presume it’s EPA, in which case it was driven mildly to get that range rating. Drive more aggressively than EPA and it’ll get worse, drive more mildly than EPA and get better.

  5. Bacardi says:

    Looks like it still has the center rear seat hump…In the U.S. I predict it to mirror ELR sales…This will built in China, yet may be a surprise hit in China since they like large cars like this and it will qualify for extra govt incentives since it’s built there…

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      The hump is due to the drive shaft.

  6. Murrysville EV says:

    This will sell like the ELR – maybe 2500 copies in all – and then it will be discontinued in late 2019.

    1. JeremyK says:

      I actually think China is the primary market.

  7. Nix says:

    This should be good for up to around 10K miles per year when charged at home, and 18K miles if charged at work too.

    Definitely a very nice reduction in gas consumption compared to the gas version of the same car, and well worth supporting.

  8. Ct200h says:

    GM is leveraging the Volt tech very well indeed!
    Things are heating up.

    Come on Lexus now we need a plug in sedan or suv from you.

  9. Ct200h says:

    Wonder what the on board chargers rate is?

    1. Dan S. says:

      The one video mentions charging is less than 5 hrs.
      Which means since it has the same battery pack as G2 Volt. It is using the same charger. 3.6 kW

  10. WadeTyhon says:

    The price is a little steep but the performance improvement, size, and luxury over the Volt is substantial enough to actually justify the price I think.

    The ELR was a gorgeous car, but as a 2 door that was no quicker or more powerful than the Volt, it was a hard sell at it’s high price.

  11. Avishay says:

    GM is fast becoming the leader in plug in cars among legacy carmakers. Their hybrids offer real usable AER unlike those form Merc, BMW and the rest.
    Interesting to note the engine drives all wheels despite the fact that there are 2 electric motors (usually in those cases the rear wheels are purely electric). Also, the battery stack looks huge and it seems would devour trunk space.

  12. Chris B says:

    It does seem a shame that they could not make use of the floor space or area under the rear seat for some of that battery. It surely must eat into the trunk space for what is otherwise a much better combo than equivalents from BMW in terms of electric range.

    1. floydboy says:

      Yeah, the high battery placement also may have a detrimental effect on handling.🙁

      1. bogdan says:

        Yes, ICE architecture is not suitable for BEV powertrain.
        That makes EVs look pretty stupid. The car is more expensive and has no trunk.
        And u have to fill it with gas and electricity.

    2. ModernMarvelFan says:

      It is harder to put the battery in the floor when you have to run the hot exhaust around them. That is the issue with PHEV.

      Also, PHEV requires a more robust cooling system with the battery cell due to higher discharging rate which makes the pack bulkier.

      1. BenG says:

        The problem is trying to shoehorn a substantial battery into an existing ICE car will inevitably have big compromises, like this car clearly loses a lot of trunk space over the ICE version.

        I imagine a ground-up design PHEV large sedan could do MUCH better in space efficiency and MPGe.

        1. DJ says:

          Sure but it is gonna cost a lot more as well…

  13. HVACman says:

    This is not AWD and not FWD. It is a rear-wheel drive vehicle with a front-mounted engine, just as they have built full size cars for about a century. Drive shaft, Voltec transmission, etc. creates the traditional center tunnel.

    The genius is the Voltec RWD transmission – this drive train is just one step away from dropping into a Silverado or Yukon and creating a PHEV work-horse with incredible towing capacity, great mpg, and 30 miles AER!

    Great job, GM

    1. georgeS says:

      The truck app is way more cool IMO.

    2. wavelet says:

      You’re forgetting the relative weights and aerodynamics of those huge-ass trucks. Voltec right now is suited for a compact car only, and those are all 3 sizes larger.

  14. Tim says:

    This car will sell in the hundreds, and that’s about it. Average age of the buyer will be 68.

  15. Bill Howland says:

    “…Not Tesla territory, but not too shabby…”

    Actually this is far more advanced than Tesla, what with its 3 planetary gearboxes and 5 clutches – for jack-rabbit starts off the line, and combining all 3 sources for fast acceleration. Something the GEN1 and partially, the Gen 2 Volts are still lacking, that of somewhat inefficient performance at 0-20 mph. All Teslas suffer this problem also. This is why although my Roadster was rated at 244 mile range, agressive driving would lower it to under 50 miles.

    ” 30 mile range is horribly inefficient.”

    Agreed, I dont buy it. My 37 mile range ELR gets 50 in mild weather and semi-hypermile driving can get better than 60.

    The hybrid steel/aluminum construction keeps the weight down.

    Similarly, I bet in fair weather, with the over 18 kwh battery, the thing goes 50 miles easily.

    GM is known for being very conservative on their mileage ratings. That is why the BOLT seemingly will go 300 miles without trying, even though its ‘rating’ is 238.

    People will complain about the lousy 3.6 kw charger, or the caddy price – but I’m taking a wait and see attitude to see what the ‘out the door’ price REALLY is. I got $27,000 off list on my no options ELR.

    Instead of a tiny econobox, I greatly CONGRATULATE GM for having the guts to ELECTRIFY its LARGEST flagship sedan.

    1. BenG says:

      Far more complicated does not equal far more advanced.

      How many bajillion more moving parts does the Caddy have over the Tesla?

      I’d take the Model S any day, but I do applaud GM electrifying this car.

      1. Bill Howland says:

        Yes, but Simplicity doesn’t necessarily mean Elegance or reliability, either.

        Its conceivable that Cadillac ‘Layed an EGG’ here, and just came up with an “Engineer’s Wet Dream” – but we’ll have to see how the car behaves in real life. If in practice, they get far better mileage than the EPA rating, then, it was worth it.

        Me, I would have taken the basic Prius/Volt so-called Voltec design, (people will say the Prius is different than the volt since the motors and engine are in different places, but to me that’s just a distinction without a real difference) and accepted the 0-20 mph inefficiency (after all, Tesla products have that too so there’s no really big competitive disadvantage) , and just beefed up the planetary gearbox and clutches to handle the somewhat larger load.

        Most people interested in this car I’d think wouldn’t insist on 0-60 in 2 seconds.

        (I admit I don’t care that much about raw horsepower, – possibly putting me in the minority of car buyers).

        1. BenG says:

          Its price falls between a Model S 75 and a 75D.

          Compared to the S75, the Caddy is $2,000 more expensive and cuts the 0-60 time of the S by .3 seconds.

          The S gets 50% better mpg-e and has (I assume) much better cargo room, and I’d also assume better handling, given the lower center of mass.

          The Caddy will be much more luxurious by traditional measures, but the Tesla has the luxury of being gas-free and much cleaner to operate.

          Predicted reliability by Consumer Reports of the regular ICE CT6 is average, same as the Tesla. But with such a large change to the powertrain, nobody knows what the reliability of the plug-in CT6 will be – advantage Tesla.

          As I said I’d choose the Tesla, hands down. I can understand why some people might prefer the CT6 plug-in, but I expect low sales because of the combination of high price and reduced cargo area compared to the regular CT6.

          Again, kudos to GM for building this. I hope they sell more than a few. I am very unimpressed with initial mpg-e estimate, but it’s a heck of a lot better than the regular CT6, so that’s cool.

    2. Stimpy says:

      Complication is not better. It is certainly impressive in engineering terms but the better solution is LESS complication to achieve the same goals.

      The trunk space used and (it appears) no trunk pass-through would alone cross this off my ~$75k shopping list and compares extremely poorly with Tesla that has more storage space than usual.

  16. Rick Kop says:

    I was hoping for a bit more EV range. Something more like the Volts 50 mile range qor at least as much as the ELR. Disappointing

  17. DJ says:

    If you are in the market for a comparably equipped CT6 I don’t know why you wouldn’t seriously consider this.

    With the rebates it is comparable in price if not cheaper depending on which rebates you have available. Realistically most people in this price range would be able to take advantage of the rebate as well.

    To those who are saying this is an expensive car it is but the plug in version isn’t much more expensive and can actually be cheaper than the non plug in variant so I don’t get their point.

    Would have hoped for 40 to 50 miles of range but I guess we’ll have to wait for them to use the newer cells to get that.

    Hopefully it does well. The ELR failed IMO because it was a slightly nicer Volt that had slightly better performance. The CT6 is not in the same class of car like the Voltmso right now I don’t really know what you could accurately compare it to that has a plug in option. It isn’t a S class or 7 series competitor in my mind but I guess those are the closest option and they are significantly more expensive.

  18. Kdawg says:

    How much does it cost in China, and how does that compare to other luxury plug-ins in China? China is the #1 luxury car market.

  19. Steve says:

    Surprised nobody asked… what happened to the trunk capacity as a result of building in the electric powertrain parts?

    Note – ICE version of CT6 has 15.3cu.ft. capacity.

    The utility of this car won’t be very high. It’s positioned as a 4-passenger car, ideally.

    $76,090 (plus taxes) BASE PRICE… high. Will probably be the same as an Tesla S60 with some nice options.

    1. bogdan says:

      No word about trunk capacity. I just googled and there is no information whatsoever, which makes it very suspect. Judging from the pictures, it has a trunk capacity similar to a convertable with the roof down.

      1. Bill Howland says:

        Yeah on one of the older articles on this car, they said the trunk capacity is going to be at least 1/3 less.

        We need to see a real car to see if the added complexity over a volt is worth it, or whether it just an ‘engineer’s wet dream’ with plenty of added junk that doesn’t greatly improve mileage nor performance.

  20. Doug Bostrom says:

    Sad to see this thing will have such a high CG in the rear. That battery is a tower. But -must- have RWD or it’s not kool kid.

  21. TM says:

    Nice job GM.
    I still wont buy GM, but for those who still do, it is great to bring this product out.

    Seems Toyota now appears to be lagging in technology, although their hybrid system is still very good. It is just their next Act, which seems to be a bit behind the others.

    1. BenG says:

      Yeah, Toyota is taking it slow, letting the battery improvements come with time to move EVs down into Toyota’s traditional price range.

      The Prime looks like a decent effort, with stellar efficiency, usable electric capability, and a very very good price. So it could sell a lot.

      I definitely won’t count out Toyota long term. They continue to invest in and improve their electric powertrain capacity via their hybrids, and when they do move to BEVs, they will be a force to be reckoned with.

  22. squanto says:

    I like the car. Will they bring it to Europe, too? Perhaps exclusively as hybrid version? They might not sell loads of it but it would be good for the image which could possibly help Opel Ampera-e as well.

  23. Pat McSwain says:

    Note that a CT6 is a couple steps up the ladder from a Tesla in the luxury market. 4 wheel steering, night vision, Rolls type interior, etc. A Model S lacks rear seat space, and requires EV infrastructure for long trips.

    But… I’m guessing it will be a failure. Not enough power, and it appears to be missing the entire feature set of the Platinum. The CT6 Platinum is arguably the best sedan under $100k, the PHEV should have been a Platinum with 200HP electric motor and AWD.

    1. BenG says:

      I also expect it to mostly be a failure. I don’t really see the Caddy customer wanting to give up 1/3 of their trunk-space for a battery pack.

  24. Jose says:

    Put at least 7kWh of extra bateries to see if it could get at least 50 mile electric range. Then it will be more acceptable. That way people can recognize it as a luxury Volt.

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