BYD Drives Electric Bus From California To Houston

3 years ago by Mark Kane 12

The 40-foot BYD electric bus (American-made in BYD's Lancaster, CA factory)

The 40-foot BYD electric bus (American-made in BYD’s Lancaster, CA factory)

BYD Drives Electric Bus From California To Houston

BYD Drives Electric Bus From California To Houston

After a 750-mile trip around Lancaster, California in 24 hours, BYD now demonstrates that its electric bus can go 1,500 miles from Lancaster to Houston just to catch the APTA EXPO.

According to article, there were 10 charges along the way (so, 150 miles on average) where the BYD bus was plugged into the AC power grid “to charge up in two to three hours“.

Well, it must’ve been a strong AC power source for BYD’s bus to charge up that quickly.

If you would like to see the POWER ON electric bus, you will find BYD at Booth #5437 at EXPO in Houston until Wednesday of this week.

Source: Metro Magazine

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12 responses to "BYD Drives Electric Bus From California To Houston"

  1. DaveMart says:

    ‘Well, it must’ve been a strong AC power source for BYD’s bus to charge up that quickly.’

    ‘ Buses carry three separate battery packs with a total 324-kilowatt-hour capability per full charge. Each bus has two charge points.’

    It does it by using two charge points:

    Full charge takes four hours with a fast-charger. The buses are expected to be recharged nightly when in normal municipal bus duty.’

    http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/BYD-Launches-Electric-Bus-Plant-With-Call-For-Utility-Rate-Redesign

    1. DaveMart says:

      Slightly messed up my inserted comment there.

      The quote is:
      ‘ Buses carry three separate battery packs with a total 324-kilowatt-hour capability per full charge. Each bus has two charge points.

      Full charge takes four hours with a fast-charger. The buses are expected to be recharged nightly when in normal municipal bus duty.’

      1. Bill Howland says:

        Sounds like a bit of sour grapes in that greentech report.

        The electricity is cheap enough under time of use rates to cheaply charge the battery. They are still using up transformer capacity specific to the bus depot only, hence they shouldn’t be eligable for a demand charge reduction. I question their other figures too. If Diesel is $1.10, then CNG would be cheaper than $0.90, even with the compression and maintenance cost.

        But it is cool that they can pull up to any Chargepoint dual station, use 2 Chargepoint authorization cards and charge up.

        Its better than looking for a ‘bus stop substation, which, I’ve seen dual charepoint charger docs, but I haven’t seen any bus stop substations around here lately.

  2. Ocean Railroader says:

    The Bus must have used the 600 volt to 440 volt electric plugs at the Truck Stops on the way. In that a lot of truck stops offer high voltage hook ups for freezer trucks and other power hungry truck trailers to park over night. Such as the truck plugs in turns it’s diesel engine off and runs on grid power over night. Then in the morning the truck drives off from the truck stop.

    Most likely the Bus used these 440 volt and 600volt AC truck stop plugs to fill up.

    What this means for the future is major bus lines could switch over electricity with these systems of high voltage AC.

    1. Bill Howland says:

      I was under the impression these things used 2 standardized, single phase j1772 ports. So you can charge up anywhere.

      1. DaveMart says:

        Whatever they were using was about 50kw*2 – the last 20% would slow down, and Greentech quotes 4 hours for a full charge.

        1. wraithnot says:

          The specs quote a 5 hour recharge time with 60 kW (30 kW x2, 480 V, 3-phase AC) and a 1.6 hour recharge time with 200 kW (100 kW x2, 480 V, 3-phase AC)
          http://www.byd.com/na/auto/ElectricBus.html

          I’m guessing the 324 kWh is the nominal battery capacity and the usable capacity is less than 300 kWh because otherwise the math doesn’t work out. They also describe the range as 155 miles and the power consumption as 1.92 kWh/mi which implies a usable capacity of something like 298 kWh.

  3. Foo says:

    Wow.. how disappointing would it be to pull up to a bank of charging stations, and find a BUS taking up all six spots, and using two of the stations?!

    🙂

  4. Bill Howland says:

    OH ok, found out it doesn’t use j1772

    THey use a Mennekes system (30 kw x 2 jacks),or around 44 amps per mennekes jack (88 amps total @ 230Y/400 volts).

    A small autotranformer at the bus station would convert the incoming 480 to 380-400 for the 60 kw required in the States.

    Canadians would have a similar autotransfomrer of 600 to 380, and europeans could just have 2 Mennekes charging docks unmodified.

    1. Bill Howland says:

      Ok, hummm the autotransformer is unnecessary in North America, or at least in the states.

      I was mistaken in thinking the mennekes connectors were only good for the standard 400 volts.

      Apparently in the states, the standard and high power chargers can both tolerate 480 volts directly. I stand corrected. 2 mistakes in one blog, darn. In my defense, I self-corrected them, hehe.

  5. Ford Prefect says:

    Okay, so they drove the 40′ bus to the APTA Expo… How did they get the 60′ articulated bus there?

  6. mhpr262 says:

    324kwh! That bus sucks down a LOT of go juice.