BMW i3 Gets CHAdeMO Charged In Japan

3 years ago by Eric Loveday 32

BMW i3 CHAdeMO

BMW i3 CHAdeMO

7 months ago, we broke news of the fact that BMW had decided to not offer CCS in favor of CHAdeMO for the i3 in Japan.

The CHAdeMO inlet is located on the right rear fender of the BMW i3, while the standard slow charger is tucked away in the frunk.

Some had speculated that this wasn’t the case and that BMW would not venture away from CSS, not even in Japan.  Well, here’s your proof that the BMW i3 is not offered with CCS (Combo) fast charging in Japan, but rather CHAdeMO.

Though tucking the standard slow charging inlet in the frunk isn’t an ideal setup, we have to ask:

If BMW made this exact CHAdeMO setup optional in the US, would you opt for it over CCS?  Wouldn’t it be nice if automakers just offered the choice of either option and let the customer choose?  How about both?

BMW i3 CHAdeMO

BMW i3 CHAdeMO

BMW i3 CHAdeMO

BMW i3 CHAdeMO

BMW i3 Standard Charging Inlet in Frunk

BMW i3 Standard Charging Inlet in Frunk

Image credits and a BIG hat tip to Kiyoshi Fujiwara!!!

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32 responses to "BMW i3 Gets CHAdeMO Charged In Japan"

  1. David Murray says:

    I’m at a loss to understand why J1772 is in the trunk. After all, the J1772 will be used more often. I’d rather it be the other way around and put the chademo in the trunk.

    1. QCO says:

      The ideal set up would be to have CHAdeMO at the front behind a door (one of the kidneys) to match Leaf and Soul to simplify “nose in” charging at public stations, and the J1772 on the left front fender to allow easy driver access for day-to-day AC charging (right front for RHD countries).

    2. Spec9 says:

      This! This seems completely backwards.

    3. Just_chris says:

      Do you know what the difference between a porcupine and a bmw is?

      I do, it makes perfect sense to me that you can pull up to a public or work place charger in a BMW, plug in and lock the connection in the frunk to ensure that no one else can unplug you. This will be used to best effect if you pull in, unplug the half charged Nissan and lock that charging connection safely into you BMW i3 with a rex.

      1. Jelloslug says:

        That is why Leaf owners just push the “Lock” button for the charging handle.

  2. ClarksonCote says:

    “If BMW made this exact CHAdeMO setup optional in the US, would you opt for it over CCS? Wouldn’t it be nice if automakers just offered the choice of either option and let the customer choose? How about both?”

    What would be nice is if we had one standard. There’s enough hurdles to overcome to allow EV’s to become mainstream without competing charging standards.

  3. Alex says:

    CHAdeMO won the global fight because CHAdeMO Cars are more affordable, so we will see more chademo cars.

    1. Spec9 says:

      Uh . . . you do realize this is only for Japan, right?

  4. Andrei says:

    “If BMW made this exact CHAdeMO setup optional in the US, would you opt for it over CCS? Wouldn’t it be nice if automakers just offered the choice of either option and let the customer choose? How about both?”

    This will be a great option to have even in Europe, there are more CHAdeMO charging stations then Combo . Or offer one, but with the standard adaptor to the other included in the car package.

  5. kdawg says:

    What? You have to leave your frunk open to charge? What if it’s raining/snowing, or you have stuff in there?

    1. kdawg says:

      Looking closer at the pic, it appears you may be able to shut the frunk w/the cord plugged in… whew.

    2. Phd says:

      The rationale is that slow charge (Type 1) is for home and sometimes workplace charging whereas, Quick Charge is what most customers will use while on the go.

      Phd

      1. Spec9 says:

        So the one you do every day requires opening the hood? That is silly.

  6. kdawg says:

    “If BMW made this exact CHAdeMO setup optional in the US, would you opt for it over CCS? Wouldn’t it be nice if automakers just offered the choice of either option and let the customer choose? How about both?”
    ———–

    Can I get the Tesla charge port option? 🙂

    1. Taser54 says:

      Not that Tesla, seeing the barriers put in place by Japan, acquiesced to to CHADEMO charging.

      1. Taser54 says:

        Note

  7. scottf200 says:

    “If BMW made this exact CHAdeMO setup optional in the US, would you opt for it over CCS?”

    To states the obvious but is overlooked … clearly the BMW engineers and design teams have looked at both current and future uses of CCS and chademo connections … then they picked CCS. Certainly this was debated but must have technical reasons for it. These are dumb people who have a **cursory** understanding of the various specifications (beyond a basic 50kW level charge).

    1. ggpa says:

      “Certainly this was debated but must have technical reasons for it.”

      Some people also think our elected leaders debate things in good faith and come up with great, thoughtful solutions.

      You are so naive …

      1. Taser54 says:

        Hmm so CHADEMO was a political choice by Japan. Got it.

      2. kdawg says:

        I didn’t know “engineers and design teams “were “elected leaders”.

    2. scottf200 says:

      Correction: “These [BMW engineers] are [not] dumb people who have a **cursory** understanding of the various specifications (beyond a basic 50kW level charge).”

  8. offib says:

    The i3 just appears to be so much more attractive with CHAdeMO.

    1. Brandon says:

      not

  9. Anon says:

    Slow “Fast Charge” format for whimpy short range EVs…

    1. Aaron says:

      CHAdeMO is 50kW to 62kW at today’s stations. The standard is designed to handle up to 100kW. How is this slow again?

  10. QCO says:

    The only way CCS1 gets traction in North America is if key manufacturers force it by refusing to provide CHAdeMO cars. That’s what is happening in the case of GM/Ford/BMW.

    But GM and Ford favor PHEVs that don’t need QCDC, which will further delay CCS1 rollouts.

    In the meantime, plenty of Asian BEVs will be sold with CHAdeMO which will further drive more CHAdeMO infrastructure.

    For better or worse, CHAdeMO will dominate. The Europeans saw this coming, so they forced CCS2 through regulation. That’s less likely to happen in North America.

    1. FFY says:

      Hm, we’ll have to see. I think in Europe the European EV manufacturers will easily outsell Nissan going forward (particularly BMW i3 and VW e-Up/e-Golf).

      I think the i3 Chademo solution is somewhat kludgy. I’d rather have both receptacles behind one door. Perhaps the need to have two ports (and two controllers to support the different charging protocols) is actually the reason why the European manufacturers don’t like Chademo?

      1. QCO says:

        Agree with your point about two connectors. A single compact universal AC/DC connector with assignable pins would be better, but only Tesla is doing that.

        It’s the CHAdeMO head start and momentum that can’t be ignored, which suggests public QCDC stations are likely always going to have a CHAdeMO hose, regardless of whether or not there is a CCS1 or CCS2 hose.

  11. mike w says:

    I would question the intelligence of anybody that thinks it ok to have to open the frunk to recharge. And yes I would like to be able to have the choice CHAdeMO or CCS. CHAdeMO is already well established in the USA. CCS fast charging in the usa is latterly nonexistent.

  12. Phd says:

    Case and point that CCS was engineered uniquely as a mean to slow down Nissan’s and Mitsubishi’s head start … by creating confusion but not adding anything new in terms of service to the customer.

    Sad really

  13. Aatheus says:

    Give me two ports. One for CCS1 and one for CHAdeMo. The more places I can charge up, the better.