BMW: 25 Electrified Models To Arrive By 2025, 12 Of Which Will Be Fully Electric

1 week ago by Mark Kane 41

Harald Krüger, Chairman of the Board of Management of BMW AG and BMW i3

Harald Krüger, Chairman of the Board of Management of BMW AG, and Klaus Fröhlich, BMW Board Member, each released statements about the electrification plans for the BMW Group, ahead of the Frankfurt Motor Show in Germany that looks to be one of the best when it comes to the volume of new plug-ins expected to debut.

Meet the 2020 BMW i5 Rendering

In total, the BMW Group intends to offer 25 electrified vehicles (all-electric or plug-in hybrids) by 2025. That would mean a doubling of the current offer.

The second major note, and even more impressive, is that 12 of those 25 are to be fully electric. Currently there is only the i3, and new sportier i3s (not sure BMW counts this as 1 offering or two at this point), so it would seem that the bulk of the new electrified models will be all-electric.

The new MINI Electric Concept (2019), all-electric X3 (2020) and BMW iNEXT (2021) are three new BEVs that are coming – leaving nine more to come.

BMW further hints a new four-door, fully-electric BMW i, between i3 and i8 (maybe i5) that will be unveiled at the IAA.

“Let me make one thing very clear: In e-mobility, the BMW Group will also be the leading provider in the premium segment. By 2025, we will offer 25 electrified vehicles – 12 will be fully-electric. Today, and at the IAA, you will see the concept vehicle for the first series electric MINI, for release in 2019. As we have announced, we will be introducing the first BMW core model – the X3 – as a BEV in 2020. Going forward, all fully-electric BMWs will belong to BMW i. This also applies to the X3. We have also announced the BMW iNEXT – our next innovation spearhead – for 2021.

At this year’s IAA, we will unveil another significant milestone in our roadmap for e-mobility. It is a vision of how we imagine a four-door, fully-electric vehicle between the i3 and i8. It is a vision we want to realize in the foreseeable future. And a further step in our commitment to sustainable mobility.”

This year BMW will sell around 100,000 plug-in cars, and reach 200,000 cumulatively.

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41 responses to "BMW: 25 Electrified Models To Arrive By 2025, 12 Of Which Will Be Fully Electric"

  1. Alan says:

    It all sounds pretty desperate !

    1. Blaine says:

      It sounds like they are responding to market forces. Certainly better than the other big auto companies have done so far…

      1. Alan says:

        I wouldn’t exactly say that 2025 is responding particularly well to market forces ?

        8 years from now is a long long way off, if they were talking more 2020 for this lot then yes, I would agree.

        I would wager there probably wouldn’t be more than a handful of niche car manufacturers at most who won’t have electric BEV’s before 2020 ?

        1. Will says:

          It’s pretty well. Movie studios are releasing thier schedule of their movie universe years in advance

        2. ffbj says:

          I vote for desperate. Here is more evidence, which displays, what to me seems, bizarre logic.
          https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-09-08/bmw-goes-big-with-three-row-suv-monster-to-fund-electric-shift

          In short: We are going to build a huge
          7-seat, tank SUV, and I think we will call him George.
          It will have a few miles 22? of EV range, and it will cost a small fortune.
          We will use it to fund our ev revolution.
          –BMW

          1. Alan says:

            http://insideevs.com/bmw-concept-x7-iperformance/#comment-1313444

            Probably has more like 5 miles of range from it’s massive 9kWh battery and a $90K base price !

            Still it is a BMW concept of an “EV”

            1. ffbj says:

              Probably, I was just trying to be generous. I mean why even put an electric motor in for 5 miles. Compliance I suppose.

    2. franky_b says:

      Can you be more specific? Is it the 100K plugs sold per year? The 12 models fully electric by 2025 (not 3 may be 4 like Tesla)? Why is that desperate?

      How is that pathetic to have a car builder clearly moving toward electrifying it’s core business and actually proving it can be done. Others like Volvo and Jaguar are still just talking about it.

      I love Nissan and the Leaf, but it is still the only model offer.

      GM, only 2 model (Volt, Bolt).

      It’s not desperate, it’s a steady move toward reshaping their core business.

      1. Alan says:

        8 years from now !

        You are kidding, right ?

        I doubt anyone will be building ICE cars at all 8 years from now, heavy goods vehicles maybe but passenger vehicles ?

        1. franky_b says:

          Again, compare to what?

          Since 2014, BMW delivered 1 fully electric (and since improved range by 50%), it has

          While others are talking of electrification of power train, BMW Group offer nine electrified vehicles in its portfolio including BMW 5 Series, the MINI Cooper S E Countryman plug-in hybrid, BMW i3, BMW i8, BMW 225xe iPerformance, BMW 330e iPerformance, BMW X5 40e iPerformance and BMW 740e/740Le iPerformance, plus the BMW X1 xDrive 25Le iPerformance sold exclusively in China.

          All that in less then 4 years.

          I think they will continue to add more 100% EV, the Mini and the X3 are confirmed (Mini 2018, X3 by 2020).

          And they are doing it while remaining profitable. Again, they are showing it is possible and they are the only one to have such a line up.

          1. ffbj says:

            ..and how many did they sell, and how good are they? BMW is certainly not leading the ev parade, they are far to the rear banging on a big drum right next to VW with their Tuba, making a lot of noise.

            1. Viktor says:

              If you look at i3 it’s the 8th best selling EV in the world this year and BMW is the second best manufacturer only after Tesla if you also count PHEV.

              http://ev-sales.blogspot.se/search/label/World

              1. ffbj says:

                Tesla does not make PHEV, so why compare sales of those to Tesla?

                1. franky_b says:

                  And next you are going to tell use if it doesn’t have 60kW, it’s not really an EV.

            2. Tom says:

              BMW is number 2 worldwide in EVs.

          2. Alan says:

            Compared to where the market will have shifted by 2020, I’m not talking about overpriced cars with less than 20 miles EV range either.

            ICE cars will be banned from entering cities within the next couple of years, resale values are already plummeting, the cork is out of the bottle, there are already cars like the new Nissan Leaf which will be available in a few months time, model 3, Zoe which will cover shorter travelling distances in Europe, not to mention the cost of fuel to put in BMW’s overpriced cars.

            If they don’t want to lose more market share, they had better bring to market affordable BEV’s quicker than 2025.

            1. mxs says:

              Wow, you just keep writing a pile of non-sense, don’t you? Why not put a bit of thought into it ?

              ICE cars will be banned from entering cities in next two years???? You are the reason why EV’s make such a slow headway with naysayers, because people read this and get upset, and rightfully so.

              Obviously, the required and necessary transition will take some time, and long one, whether you like it or not.

              Not sure why it has to be repeated so many times, but to compare product planning between Tesla roadmap, and let say, BMW roadmap is a silly thing to do. Tesla has no ICE baggage, obviously and has plenty investors to fund their effort. Legacy OEM’s need to continue making money by selling ICE cars so they can transit into non-ICE times? It’s not that difficult to understand or is it?

            2. Doggydogworld says:

              Alan – please identify which cities will ban ICE in the next “couple of years”.

              Oslo, Brussels, Copenhagen and a few others plan to create or expand central areas that ban ALL cars. Paris and London plan to ban diesels from small central areas. Berlin has a much larger (34 sq mile) low emissions zone. I could see that becoming EV-only at some point, but not in the next couple of years.

            3. franky_b says:

              That’s quite the coo-laid you have been drinking.

              You seem to believe only Tesla will produce car in the future? Fanboy doesn’t really describe what you are.

              PHEV have their place in the transition. If a PHEV allow someone to reduce their carbon foot print by 50%, 70%, 90%, then it’s part of the solution. Why do we have to keep repeating this? Why do you have to by a 60kW battery to only fully use it 2%-3% of the time.

              2020, really? A list please. So far we have France & the UK for 2040. The Netherlands has mooted a 2025 ban for diesel and petrol cars, and some federal states in Germany are keen on a 2030 phase-out.

              India, where scores of cities are blighted by dangerous air pollution, is mulling the idea of no longer selling petrol or diesel cars by 2030, and said it wants to introduce electric cars in “a very big way”. No 2020 in that list, 2030 in the earliest.

              You mentioned the Leaf (at 40kW) but the i3 at 33kW and soon 44kW isn’t good enough? The X3 fully electric not good enough for you? The Mini electric not good enough either. Nothing is really good enough unless it has the Tesla badge on it.

              Well Tesla won’t replace all cars (they won’t even meet their production numbers, if they produce 100K M3/year on top of S/X, that will already be an accomplishment.)

              People like you are not part of the solution, they are part of the problem by trying to create an alternative reality that doesn’t exist.

        2. me says:

          LOL. ICE cars will be the primary sellers for at least the next 10 years. I’m all for EVs but some of you are way too bullish on when it will be mainstream (and we’re a long way off still). Once you can get a 300 mile range EV for around $20k, not counting any sort of tax incentives, then you can talk about ICE cars not being sold anymore.

          1. ffbj says:

            It will take a while but if you look at luxury segment first, which was the focus of Tesla, you can get a snapshot of what other segments may look like in the not too distant future.

            So now the mid priced range, 30k-40k is getting the shock treatment. Let’s see how that goes over the next couple of years before we jump to conclusions about ev acceptance.

            Moves by government, penalties/incentives, improvements in evs, loss of resale value of ice, and a fundamental shift in pov regarding evs, are bound to have a profound impact on the alacrity of inevitable ev adoption. [Norway]

          2. Alan says:

            Well, I hope you like public transport because you almost certainly won’t be driving your ICE car into any city by 2020 !

            1. mxs says:

              LOL … yeah keep writing the non-sense and we will keep driving, ok?

            2. Ricardo says:

              Yeah man, you know it. It’s just like those other folks telling you that Elvis is, in fact, dead. They don’t know man, they haven’t seen it bro. UFOs are real. You gotta believe, believe man.

      2. F150 Brian says:

        +1

        While just “plans” at this point. Everyone here should remember that the big global automakers have deep pockets, massive production assets *and* lots of experience designing new models.

        Like I’ve stated before, mature companies act on plans to build profitable products and play with small scale projects to gain experience. Once the battery supply / cost is right and the market demonstrates acceptance in scale, they will respond.

        Here, BMW is stating that the business case has been made and they are ready to act. I believe they will add models at twice the rate Tesla does.

    3. WARREN says:

      Sounds like a bold move to me. Obviously you haven’t kept up with the facts on BMWs production objectives. Commendable to say the least.

  2. Get Real says:

    I think BWM is primarily being pressured into electrifying by the disruption of Tesla which is taking some market share now and with the Model 3, threatening to take a lot more.

    I think BMW is leading the Western world in adding plugs to its models in a compliance-type way.

    I think BMW is really missing their chance to apply their really excellent I-Series architecture (skateboard type flat battery packs in the floor and optional drop-in range extenders) to their entire line.

    All in all, their moves represent progress, albeit in a mixed bag way.

  3. speculawyer says:

    Tesla drank BMW’s milkshake. BMW is forced to respond. It’s that simple.

    1. Some Guy says:

      The question is, how much wil they hurt until 2025, and will they be able to sell their compliance PHEVs with near zero AER? The i3-Rex is the only PHEV from BMW that deserves to be counted, as it is the only one not advertised under “you don’t have to plug it in”.
      I guess, they wil hurt a lot, as the Model 3 is a direct competitor for the BMW 3-series, and when Tesla ramps up as intended, BMW is going to take the biggest hit, along with the C-class of Daimler.
      My prediction: by 2025, Tesla will sell more cars anually than BMW (counting all types of powertrain), worldwide.

      1. franky_b says:

        In the last 4 years BMW has increase its market share. And among traditional car vendor, they are the one with the highest plug ratio in their overall sales.

        They are doing fine and are proof you can transform without reducing sales

      2. franky_b says:

        from you: “My prediction: by 2025, Tesla will sell more cars anually than BMW (counting all types of powertrain), worldwide.”

        My Prediction: Tesla will take 2 to 3 years to fully deliver those 400K+ reservation and by that time (2019-2020). Traditional car maker will have a least one model with 200 miles or more. BMW will have 3 to 4.

        1. Some Guy says:

          Our two statements do not exclude each other…
          BMW is of course welcome to join the party, the more models the merrier…
          However, will they aim those 3-4 next models for an annual production of 10k, 30k or 300k units each? And will they be available outside of China? I bet they could sell more i3 if they would make them (they have delivery times of several months for those as I have heard). Also, it would be great if the PHEV offerings were not engineered to just barely meet the minimum standards to qualify for incentives somewhere, but would go a bit further AER to make a difference.

    2. pjwood1 says:

      But will BMW respond with milkshake, or powdered milk? “Electrification”, here means anything with a plug, but elsewhere it can be a sub-hybrid (Mild). That’s how counting 12 BEVs becomes a more important piece of info.

  4. Mark C says:

    The article doesn’t say they will introduce all of those 25 in 2025. It says: “BMW Group intends to offer 25 electrified vehicles (all-electric or plug-in hybrids) by 2025. That would mean a doubling of the current offer.” “By 2025” does not carry the same meaning as the heading choice of words: “until.” BMW also says 12 will be BEV.

    I’d say BMW is doing pretty good considering their size in the industry. It would seem they are already ahead of VW, who claims they will rule the EV World in just a few years, Toyota who may be showing a spark of interest, Ford who plans to bring “electrified” models {mostly hybrid or PHEV} and 1 (ONE) BEV by 2020 +/-, and FCA who just wants to sell you a Ram pickup.

  5. Mark C says:

    Sorry, I left GM, with their awesome history of electrified transportation out of my previous post. They aren’t overly impressive with their foot-dragging dealers on the Bolt, ELR and Volt, nor thier compliance, couple of states only Spark.

  6. Ben says:

    Elon Musk was 1 year old, when BMW built its first EV. They have been committed since. Technology was not there to mass produce and sell EVs and as of today it needs some more years to get cost efficient for true low budget/midpriced cars (without a loss of money).

    When people show nothing but denial and hatred when other car companys but Tesla start to mass produce EVs, it pretty much shows, that these people are not here for the environment or future of urban mobility, they are here because they are fanboys. When BMW is selling more and more cars year after year, earning billions, the management might have done the right thing. If it was Tesla, who would develop 13PHEV/ 12EVs until 2025 there would be a chorus of praise…

    1. Some Guy says:

      Building exactly one prototype with a range covering the marathon distance as a marketing gag driven only during said race at the 1972 olympics in Munich and then not offering anything available for sale for around 4 decades (until others beat them to it in offering electric cars at all) is clearly a sign of commitment.

      True, to electrify low budget cars cost efficient is still a challenge for a few years to come (except in China), but last time I checked BMW is not exactly known for making low budget cars, so they could make an effort.

      As for the recent growth of BMW, check out how much of that growth is entirely related to Plug-in vehicles (deduct them and the growth is minimal).

      I’m not showing any denial or hatred against others who make EVs (for the EVs, and decent Plug-Ins, that is). However, I expect more than just announcements, for stuff that’s going to maybe happen in 8 years, or compliance products. A major German newssite today published an article entitled “A nightmare called Tesla” about the fear that is going on amongst the managers of domestic manufacturers, that are now beginning to realize that the train has left the station without them quite a while ago already and is accellerating quickly. That says it all…

      1. Ben says:

        https://www.google.de/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/history-of-bmws-electric-cars-2016-5

        There was not business case for EVs with lead-batteries, no customers who wanted a car with 400kg of battery for not even 40km of range with little power and bad cycle life. There were not many renewable energy sources either, EVs are just a little bit better to the environment today than ICEs (well to wheel ~30% with a small battery, much less with a bigger), back then they have been worse. Stop denying this!

  7. Epicurus says:

    World War II took a lot less time.

  8. Neo says:

    The biggest difference between BMW and Tesla is that one makes money and the other burns it towards bankrupcy… guess who is who?

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