Back in 1915, Electric Vehicle Covered 372 Miles in 3 Days

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 2

1915 Article Published in the Washington Post

1915 Article Published in the Washington Post

Even way back in 1915, electric vehicle owners we’re gunning for distance records.

Shockingly, almost 100 years ago, the three-day distance record stood at a tick over 372 miles.

Surely today electric vehicles can surpass that number with relative ease (it’s still not an easy feat for any vehicle other than the Tesla Roadster or Model S, but it’s doable), but what’s so amazing here is that quick-chargers didn’t exist and that during one leg of this 1915 record-setting run, A. E. Parsons drove his Detroit Electric Brougham 83 miles without recharging.  Even the Nissan LEAF would pushed to near its limits trying to accomplish that.

Yes, much has changed in terms of electric vehicles over the last 100 or so years, but record-setting range runs seem to be one constant in the past, present and future of electric automobiles.

Tags: , , , , ,

2 responses to "Back in 1915, Electric Vehicle Covered 372 Miles in 3 Days"

  1. Warren says:

    Yup. Touring bicyclists often beat this. I can do this on my electric assist bike, on my 1 kWh pack, by loafing along at 16 mph, for less than eight hours a day.

    http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/electric-cars/

  2. Brave Little Toaster says:

    “A. E. Parsons drove his Detroit Electric Brougham 83 miles without recharging. Even the Nissan LEAF would pushed to near its limits trying to accomplish that.”

    *coughsputterhack*

    Yeah, a Leaf has trouble getting 83 miles per charge under the following conditions:

    – You’re doing 70 on the freeway with the AC cranked.
    – You’re doing anything under -10 °C.

    However, the same conditions mentioned in the above article, simply didn’t exist (the article doesn’t say, but I’m going to guess it was done in the warmer months). I doubt the Detroit Electric even had a heater, and in 1915 it would have been considered especially luxurious if it did, since half the population was still using horses for transportation. No, this car was puttering along on (probably completely unimproved, so ruts and mud puddles) “country” roads at a top speed of 35 miles per hour. You could easily make 140 miles per charge in a Leaf that way, and probably considerably more. The difference is that noone would *let* you go that slow on any road outside of town these days.

    Also, for one-day distance comparison, let’s try this:

    http://www.plugincars.com/my-280-mile-single-day-nissan-leaf-roadtrip-127060.html

    That’s 75% of that 372 mile, 3 day journey, and he was barely even going out of his way.

    I’ll tell you what. We’re planning on taking our Leaf out on a road trip this summer, and we’ll tell you how well it goes.