ANSI Outlines 5 Challenges That Must be Addressed to Broaden Appeal of Electric Vehicles

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 9

Ansi EVSP Roadmpa Version 2.0

Ansi EVSP Roadmap Version 2.0

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) released Version 2.0 of its Standardization Roadmap for Electric Vehicles, developed by the Institute’s Electric Vehicles Standards Panel (EVSP).  Yes, that’s quite a mouthful there, so let’s refer to it as simply Version 2.0 from here on.

It's All About Standards

It’s All About Standards

Version 2.0 “tracks progress to implement recommendations” made in the now outdated version 1.0, which was released in April 2012.

Additionally, Version 2.0 highlights some areas where more work is needed, mostly in standardization, to  “facilitate the safe, mass deployment of electric vehicles” in the US.

In Version 2.0, ANSI (whoops…we slipped that ANSI back in somehow) says EVs “face significant challenges to widespread adoption” and suggests that the following “challenges” must be successfully addressed:

    • Safety: While inherently neither more nor less safe than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles, EVs do have unique safety complexities and risks which must be understood and accounted for as part of the vehicle life cycle.
    • Affordability: Cost is a critical issue which must be continually addressed in order for EVs to become widely accepted and broadly penetrate the consumer market.
    • Interoperability: The ability to recharge anywhere in a secure fashion will greatly enhance EV driver flexibility and user convenience.
    • Performance: The ability to extend the driving range of EVs on a single battery charge without the need for range extension is largely due to energy storage capabilities (batteries) and a function of technology development.
    • Environmental Impact: The demand from both regulators and consumers for “greener” vehicles (i.e., more fuel-efficient, less reliant on fossil fuels) must be met.

That “ability to recharge anywhere in a secure fashion” seems to be the key point in Version 2.0  It’s touched upon throughout and will become an increasingly common concern as the SAE Combo Charger competes with CHAdeMO for international standardization.  We know what side of the quick-charge fence we’re on, but how ’bout you?

via Ansi EVSP Roadmap (pdf)

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9 responses to "ANSI Outlines 5 Challenges That Must be Addressed to Broaden Appeal of Electric Vehicles"

  1. Mark H says:

    Safety: While inherently neither more nor less safe they must be understood and accounted for.
    Discharge the battery if you are ever in an accident. Understood and accounted for.

    Affordability: Cost is a critical issue.
    A Nissan Leaf can be had for $21,300 and your fuel cost reduced 4x. Next

    Interoperability & Performance: The ability to recharge anywhere and ability to extend the driving range on a single battery charge.
    For the few times “we” want to extend our range “we” don’t want to lug around a heavy engine just for that, “we” want to lug around a heavy battery instead….. “WE” do not all think the same on quick charging. When there is a quick charge infrastructure this will change but in the mean time “we” are confusing the public on how this can be accomplished thus holding back the advancement of sales.

    Environmental Impact: The demand from both regulators and consumers for “greener” vehicles.
    Same as any product. Make consumers aware of where components are manufactured. Buy the product that has the least environmental impact.

    1. GeorgeS says:

      “For the few times “we” want to extend our range “we” don’t want to lug around a heavy engine just for that, “we” want to lug around a heavy battery instead”

      Owning a Volt I would ALMOST agree. I need an honest 70 miles range in the winter. So the Leaf won’t work for me. I agree w/ kdawg that a 200 mile EV would be about right. However, I do think the i3 RE is a nice compromise. I want more accel and I want more EV range than the Volt has. Really itching to hear more about the i3!

      1. Mark H says:

        Sorry George, I was being a bit crass over the use of “we”. There are many issues without consensus and it should not be implied otherwise. And there is no key point in the 170 page ANSI standard. That was implied too.

    2. fountain says:

      > Discharge the battery if you are ever in an accident.

      It is like “burn all your fuel if you are in accident”. Have you ever tried to short circuit a liion battery? If not, watch some videos on youtube showing this process.

      > A Nissan Leaf can be had for $21,300

      In soviet russia i-miev costs about $50000…

  2. George Parrott says:

    Even though I have Leaf VIN # 320, if I was shopping today I would get the Chevy Spark, faster better range and $2000 less.

    1. GeorgeS says:

      and a good TMS!!

    2. evnow says:

      George, what makes you think Spark has more range ? Compare Spark’s range to 84 miles that Leaf got on 100% charging.

  3. Gadge says:

    The SAE International coupler is the better alternative since it would allow a single standardized receptacle for electric cars, but it may be late to the party. Being first, the CHAdeMO system may win out…need I remind you of the BETA vs VHS tape battle.

    1. Josh says:

      The biggest difference with the QC situation and Beta/VHS, is because a significant portion of the cost is the grid connection and site infrastructure. Once a site is established, switching the plug would not be expensive. Adapters may also be available in the future too.