Another Study Reports Extreme Growth For EVs, 130 Million By 2025

5 years ago by Mike Buchanan 6

According to Global Information, over 250 million EVs will be sold by 2025

According to Global Information Inc., the total sales of EVs will reach 130 million units by 2025. The main reason for this number is because there is currently a gradual trend of needing a vehicle with a alternative fuel source.

Global Information did fudge the number a bit, according to review of the data by Smart Plant. Based on the report, the 130 million units include cars, trucks, motorcycles, and scooters that offer either a plug-in electric motor or a pure EV.

The report uses all vehicles to count toward the total sales figure including bikes

To get to this 130 million figure, Global Information used the compound annual rate found between 2010-2011.   These early results, and the growth from year to year, is likely being skewed because of the use of incentives to encourage people to buy plug-in vehicles. Skewing demand estimates skyward.

However, as time goes by,  Global Information believes consumer education, growing infrastructure, and a lowering of sticker prices as the technology advances will increase demand for EVs as credits, perks and rebates expire..

Although automakers are making investments to realize this huge adoption of EVs, range anxiety is still a problem with current technology installed with BEVs. Although this is not an issue with Chevy Volt or other extended range electric vehicles, it is still something that needs to be addressed to the general buying population.

The need, according to the report, is to have continuous backing from the federal government to strengthen the case for EVs well into the adoption process and not just for the very near term.

The lead author, and senior USC analyst Don Anair,  said “by 2025, for 70 percent of Americans, charging their electric vehicle (EV) on the regional electricity grid would result in lower global warming emissions than even today’s most efficient gasoline hybrid, the 50 miles per gallon (mpg) Prius, up from 45 percent today.”

He also added, “This improvement is thanks in part to a combination of renewable energy development and the retirement of dirty, coal-fired power plants. The federal Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects renewables increasing their share of national electricity generation from about 11 percent in 2009 to about 15 percent in 2025.”

 

To learn more about this study, take a look at the article from Smart Planet.

6 responses to "Another Study Reports Extreme Growth For EVs, 130 Million By 2025"

  1. Mark H says:

    “Although automakers are making investments to believe in this goal, range anxiety is still a problem with current technology.”

    Alright Buchanan, you can right that sentence if you like, but when you do, you must finish it with “Although automakers are making investments to believe in this goal, range anxiety is still a problem with current technology for BEVs. For this reason the industry has provided EREVs or extended range vehicles to eliminate range anxiety such as the Chevy Volt, Ford C-Max and Plug-in Prius. ”
    50,000 will begin their research on possibly their first EV in 2013. Many with no idea what a BEV or PHEV/PHV/EREV is. Again, you do not have to write that sentence, but if you do, you have to finish it.

    1. Buchanan says:

      Mark, I understand adding that range anxiety is just for BEV and not EREV however based on consumers knowledge of currently available vehicles and the use of a diesel powered car that have extremely good highway distance with proven technology , the differences of range is still an issue.

      Also, will the range only increase on BEV and not EREV models if lithium-ion technology continues?

      1. Mark H says:

        Not buying your argument. There are plenty of consumers who do not understand how all this works. But once they understand they can go 350 -500 miles on a refueling they are are more comfortable. Forget EVs for the moment and tell me the ICE that people have range anxiety over?

        Your last comment is kind of unclear as well. EREV’s will pickup “electric” range with improved technology but already have the range that BEVs seek. Range anxiety will disappear when the charging time is similar to that of an ICE and range is respectable in the 300 mile area. I am sure there are some larger instances but most people would not complain of a 300 mile BEV with a 10-15min charge time. At that point, EREVs will start to phase away. For now, the EREV already has that and your reader would not know from your statement.

        This is still an education process. Many have range anxiety when they should not. The BEV is great for many right now but they must first understand how things work. Tom Moloughney wrote a great piece on getting people to focus on the distances they really drive per day. By doing so, many would find that they are actually ready for a BEV now. My point is that you have done the opposite of Tom and actually fanned the flames of range anxiety in your sentence. The reason that I don’t let this go is price and range anxiety are the two largest hurdles for individuals to cross. Our place is to help them over not to jack the hurdle. Sorry man, I love your writing, but I stand strong on this point. If the article is aimed at those “in the know” , the sentence need not be there at all. Otherwise, it is read by those new to the industry and has to be complete.

  2. Nelson says:

    Someone needs to make a study on how much time a day the typical driver will park his car while not at home.
    i.e.
    Today I was parked from 1:00pm to 5:00pm at a shopping complex. Had lunch with the family at a Panera Bread, shopped at a Marshalls and Sam’s Club then went to a ShopRite supermarket where I parked for another hour. 5 hours is more than enough time to fully charge an EV or EREV. Come to think of it the shortest time I park my car is when I go to a “Dunkin’ Donuts” or pick-up Chinese food from a takeout and that could be as short as 10 minutes.

    With today’s selection of EV battery ranges that Tesla offers, once L2 charging stations are in every store, mall, restaurant, movie theater, shopping center and employee parking lot range anxiety won’t be an issue.

    NPNS!
    Volt#671

    1. Dave R says:

      And that’s with you assuming a 3.3 kW L2 charging rate. It seems that 6.6 kW is the new L2 standard charge rate – that’s good for ~25 mi/hour. That 10 minute Dunkin’ Donut stop would pick up 4 miles of range – probably enough to get you to/from the Dunkin’ Donut shop.

      And if your EV is quick charge capable – CHAdeMO is good for ~50 kW peak. That’s ~30 miles in 10 minutes. Tesla SuperCharger is good for ~90 kW. That’s ~50 miles in 10 minutes.

      Now if only we could only decide on a QC standard and get a decent number of the cars and stations on the road…

      Failing that J1772 is good for up to 70A or 17kW. That rate is good for about a mile a minute…

      1. Mark H says:

        And your point has to be repeated until it becomes common knowledge. I am certain the technology is going to out pace public awareness. Spoke to Jay about adding an EV 101 <(Jay's name) tab. He's game. One of us has to man up an add it.