Add Texas to Growing List of States Looking to Tax Electric Vehicle Owners

4 years ago by Eric Loveday 10

Texas Latest State to Consider Taxing Owners of Plug-In Vehicles

Texas Latest State to Consider Taxing Owners of Plug-In Vehicles

Legislation to levy a fee or tax on greener vehicles is now pending or in action in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Washington, Michigan, Virginia and Arizona (we likely missed a few).  Let’s add Texas to that list now, too.

Similar to the other states that are considering taxing owners of plug-in vehicles, Texas says its gas tax has failed to keep pace with inflation and that there’s a considerable shortage in road maintenance funds.

Tesla Owners Line Up Their Model S Sedans At The Texas Capitol In Support Of Hearing For HB 3351.  They May Soon be Taxed for Owning and Driving Electric Vehicles

Tesla Owners Line Up Their Model S Sedans At The Texas Capitol In Support Of Hearing For HB 3351. They May Soon be Taxed for Owning and Driving Electric Vehicles

So, why not tax the few thousand plug-in vehicles in Texas?

Well, it won’t make up for the shortage, but it’s less controversial than raising the gas tax, right?  Texas gasoline taxes have been unchanged in 20 years, at 38.4 cents per gallon.

That’s the line of thinking all of these states seem to be following.

In Texas, the plan is to impose an annual fee on plug-in vehicles.  The proposed bill in Texas, which is under discussion right now, will charge plug-in owners somewhere between $50 and $100 annually, similar to what other states have proposed.

Fortunately, the proposed bill in Texas is in the early stages and is only “one of the options on the table,” according to state Representative Drew Darby (R-San Angelo).

Darby says “electric vehicles that tear up our roads” should “pay their fair share.”

But like we stated above, Texas’ few thousand plug-in vehicle owners paying their “fair share” won’t make up for the road maintenance shortage of hundreds of millions, so it’s more or less an action with no noticeable result.  That is, unless you’re an electric vehicle owner.

 

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10 responses to "Add Texas to Growing List of States Looking to Tax Electric Vehicle Owners"

  1. The end of gas-only tax is nearing. Increasing MPG of new models, less annual mileage & alternative fuels have been creating budget pressure since 2006 (peak gas use in US). Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is also starting to be widely used as economics make sense for fleets of buses, garbage trucks & local delivery trucks.

    Hopefully the proposed mileage-based taxes apply to all vehicles & not just target those with electric motors?

    1. Anderlan says:

      That’s the only thing good about all this. It appears to be the actions of cowardly, oil-money-enslaved legislators. If the proletaridiots can’t see the necessity of increasing gas taxes to fix roads, then they will be forced into a mileage tax.

      (I am and most people are sure as hell not going to stand for mileage taxes that put an unfair higher burden on the smart folks who use EVs. That’s just the stupidest, most anti-progress, anti-science, anti-human, anti-technology thing ever, and only supported by greedy, future-hating oily hearted bastards.)

  2. James says:

    Unlike some plug-in owners, I don’t mind paying taxes for the roads I’m driving on, and I don’t think $100/year is unreasonable. In fact, I think it’s smart that lawmakers are getting ahead of the curve, since EV’s are here to stay, and those roads don’t pay for themselves. Now, are some lawmakers doing it because they are petulant, ignorant, and spiteful little boys? Yes, but I think it has to be done.

    1. Brady says:

      This issue seems to come up with each and every state- the question of how much the tax is and how that correlates to gas vehicles in that seems to be the sticking point. In many states (New Jersey comes to mind), the proposed taxes are higher for driving an EV than a gas vehicle. In VA, the gas tax was lowered while EV AND hybrid drivers were charged a fee higher than the average tax paid by a traditional car driver. This is where the opposition comes in for many.

  3. Aaron says:

    Email Representative Darby:

    http://www.house.state.tx.us/members/member-page/?district=72

    Let him know there are better ways than adding a tax to a minority of drivers who don’t pollute the air like the majority of drivers on the roads.

    Also bend his ear that EVs weigh far less than the SUVs and trucks that are truly tearing up the roads.

  4. kdawg says:

    “so it’s more or less an action with no noticeable result. That is, unless you’re an electric vehicle owner.”
    —————–

    Even worse, a potential EV owner. As word of this type of crap spreads, it may cause people who were thinking of buying an EV to drop it.

  5. bloggin says:

    Considering that EV owner is saving about 1,980(Leaf) per year on fuel, a $100 ($8 per month) road tax is not a bad thing. The $100 road tax may help plug-in hybrid vehicle owners focus more charging and using more electric power to avoid also paying more fuel tax.

    Hybrids however should stay with gasoline vehicles as they can’t get away from the fuel tax.

    However, a better plan is to move to everyone paying based on miles driven, type and weight of vehicle, vehicle use(personal/commercial), emissions level, and eliminate the fuel tax all together.

  6. Rhy says:

    Charge me a tax because of the city I live in (i.e., city tax) – not because I drive an EV vehicle.

    I am still paying electric bills to the local monopoly, right?

    R

    1. CowtownVolt says:

      In Texas we dont have electrical monopolies. In the cities anyway. Multiple providers.

  7. CowtownVolt says:

    100 bucks is not too bad. How about an extra 50 help build the electrical infratructure in my beloved Texas for our cars to charge. Would be nice to have quick charging stations for my new spark ev at rest stops along the highways. Hey they could even charge a little for the electricity and make a few bucks. I dont think early adopt people are gonna whine about spending money if you give us something tangeble in return.