61% of Germans Would Consider Using Electric Car for Commuting

3 years ago by Mark Kane 17

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According to a survey of 2,000 Germans, done by E.ON – most (61%) of the respondents would be willing to use electric cars for commuting.

61% is a high result, especially without incentives available on the market.

As we all know, electric cars are ideally suited for the average commute, but are they as well suited for recreation (i.e. trips, adventures, Sunday morning joy rides)?

Less than 55% would consider electric cars for recreation.

Is this indicating an upcoming increase of sales?

To date, there are more than 12,000 electric-powered cars and 85,000 hybrid cars on the roads in Germany.

Automobilwoche.de

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17 responses to "61% of Germans Would Consider Using Electric Car for Commuting"

  1. Anon says:

    39% of Germans are cognitively and culturally enslaved to continue burning hydrocarbons for transportation, despite the existence of compelling long range EVs…

    1. vdiv says:

      Or maybe they consider using public transportation, biking, or walking to werk. Wonder how the 61% changes if the EV in question is German vs imported.

    2. Carsten says:

      Being a German, living in the US and driving a 2012 MiEV I would currently not consider an electric car if I would be back in Europe. We as a family of 4 had only 1 car and did most commuting on foot, by bicycle, motorbike or public transport. A car for us is something to get cheaply from A to B and back. Here we have a 2001 ICE, that serves for longer trips but use the EV whenever possible.

  2. pete g says:

    Those numbers go up substantially when one is parked at the neighbors house and even more when petrol stations start shutting down. I’m very skeptical when it comes to polls. The real question should be how many Germans are planning to buy an electric car in the next year.

  3. mike w says:

    Germans giving up on diesel-I’m shocked to hear that. But yes Germans like to buy domestic.

    1. Mikael says:

      It’s one thing to say it, it’s another thing to do it.

  4. Mart says:

    Germany imports 97% of its petroleum. 20% of its electrical generation is from renewables. A lot of Petroleum comes from Russia and former Soviet republics.

  5. zoe-driver says:

    I am doing this now for more than a year and more tha 18.000 KM with our ZOE.

    And guess what? The next guy in my small village (2000 people) has ordered another ZOE. Delivery in October.

    That happened by letting him drive. He had no idea that these BEVs are technically ready. He did not know anything.

    Reason is that e-Car is not subsidized and very few cars are owned by private persons.

    Private person buyers are just 20% in BEV-Market here.
    So nobody is talking about that, how much fun and comfort such a BEV can offer.

    Regards

    1. Mikael says:

      And that is the real reason why subsidies are needed.
      To get a lot of cars on the roads so that other people can try them and get some tips and information from people they know and trust.

      1. zoe-driver says:

        Absoluteley.

        Thats the reason why we dont have that here. It is planned. They want to avoid the e-car revolution.

        1. Lausbub says:

          They can only postpone the electric break through!

    2. Lausbub says:

      That’s exactly what I am also experiencing.
      EV purchases are spreading out locally. One single guy starts, people get interested, try it and buy one too. I am living in an even smaller village. After one guy has bought a Model S, everybody is talking about EVs. Now, 4 months later, there are two ZOEs and one i3 in the village.
      And what I like most, one guy bought a 911 Carrera 4 recently – and nobody cares and has a look to it when it’s parked next to the Tesla, which attracts all the attention.

  6. DaveMart says:

    Typically these surveys don’t mention costs.
    Since they are unsubsidised in Germany the question is how much extra they would be prepared to pay.

    Am E-Up comes at a very large premium to a conventional one in Germany.

    1. Mr. M says:

      Sure, i would buy a used electric car at around 10k € for sure. Thats littler more than the price i paid for my actual car.

      I can not afford a tesla. Maybe in 2020 when the used Gen 3 is sold. Can’t wait. Maybe i can afford more like 20k€ then, because teslas will not decline that fast in price i think. Tesla offers decent Trunk, Long-Range possible, would fit my needs. I drive sometimes a year 300 km (one-way). Wanna do that with no stop or only very quick (15 min) due to small kids… At normal driving speed (130 km/h = 80mph). Therefore you would need at least 60kWh.

      I would buy for the same price, considering TOC for an electric car is higher (or at best equal) compared to diesel with same base price. But i think the comfort an electric drive gives would be worth the higher TOC.

      And as 60-80% in germany i life not in a snall house, so charging would be always street charging.

      1. DaveMart says:

        In purely economic terms here in the UK with a £5,000 subsidy and electricity half or so German costs, outside of London with its congestion charge the economic case for small electric cars just does not work, as the payback is never.

        Bigger cars with higher margins where you can swap out features which you don’t need such as alloy wheels or leather seating for electric if you fancy that instead are more economically doable.

    2. Lausbub says:

      A ZOE is very cheap meanwhile. In Austria you can lease it for a payment of 4000 Eur and 99 Eur monthly fee for the first year and 199 Eur for year 2 to 4 and that INCLUDES the battery leasing, which is normally 80 Eur alone.
      In addition you get an extra set of winter tyres for free.
      That’s completely without subsidy. So I think, there a not many ways to drive cheaper.

  7. Mr. M says:

    Sure, i would buy a used electric car at around 10k € for sure. Thats littler more than the price i paid for my actual car.

    I can not afford a tesla. Maybe in 2020 when the used Gen 3 is sold. Can’t wait. Maybe i can afford more like 20k€ then, because teslas will not decline that fast in price i think. Tesla offers decent Trunk, Long-Range possible, would fit my needs. I drive sometimes a year 300 km (one-way). Wanna do that with no stop or only very quick (15 min) due to small kids… At normal driving speed (130 km/h = 80mph). Therefore you would need at least 60kWh.

    I would buy for the same price, considering TOC for an electric car is higher (or at best equal) compared to diesel with same base price. But i think the comfort an electric drive gives would be worth the higher TOC.

    And as 60-80% in germany i life not in a snall house, so charging would be always street charging.