50,000th Nissan LEAF Delivered In US

3 years ago by Eric Loveday 29

Nissan LEAF 50,000 Graphic

Nissan LEAF 50,000 Graphic

Nissan is proud to announce that LEAF #50,000 in the US has been delivered.

This major milestone achievement took place earlier this month at AutoNation Nissan of Lewisville.

Dallas residents Todd and Lisa Bolt were the recipients of the 50,000th US Nissan LEAF.  The Bolts (love the names connection to electric vehicles) choose a black LEAF SL.

As Nissan states:

“Thanks to enthusiastic owner advocates, robust public charging infrastructure and the launch of a successful free charging promotion, Dallas – and the state of Texas – have become hot growth markets for LEAF. So far in 2014, LEAF sales in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex have grown by about 50 percent over the previous year, with that growth set to accelerate faster thanks in part to the introduction of a new state tax rebate of up to $2,500 on the purchase or lease of a new Nissan LEAF.”

Todd Bolt, a pastor at a local church, commented:

“Beyond the simple economics of not buying gas, we’ve been impressed with how well the LEAF drives.  When we show the LEAF off to family and friends, they’re surprised that the car is so quiet and rides so well. The LEAF does everything we need day-to-day, and given the financial savings, I don’t know why we’d buy another gas car.”

50,000th US Nissan LEAF

50,000th US Nissan LEAF

In terms of global LEAF sales, Nissan adds:

“With nearly 115,000 global sales since launch, Nissan LEAF is the world’s top-selling electric vehicle. LEAF seats up to five passengers and boasts an estimated driving range on a fully-charged battery of 84 miles and MPGe ratings of 126 city, 101 highway and 114 combined. With a starting price of less than $30,000, LEAF is competitively priced with similar gas-powered cars after applicable tax credits, while providing the benefits of lower running costs and less scheduled maintenance.”

Full Nissan press release below:

NISSAN DELIVERS 50,000TH ALL-ELECTRIC LEAF IN U.S. TO TEXAS FAMILY

DALLAS (May 23, 2014) — Nissan, the global leader in electric vehicle (EV) sales, achieved another milestone this month as Dallas residents Todd and Lisa Bolt made Nissan LEAF the first all-electric model to hit 50,000 sales in the U.S. The Bolt family took delivery of their black LEAF SL earlier this month at AutoNation Nissan of Lewisville.

Thanks to enthusiastic owner advocates, robust public charging infrastructure and the launch of a successful free charging promotion, Dallas – and the state of Texas – have become hot growth markets for LEAF. So far in 2014, LEAF sales in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex have grown by about 50 percent over the previous year, with that growth set to accelerate faster thanks in part to the introduction of a new state tax rebate of up to $2,500 on the purchase or lease of a new Nissan LEAF.

“Beyond the simple economics of not buying gas, we’ve been impressed with how well the LEAF drives,” said Todd Bolt, a pastor at Gateway Church in Southlake. “When we show the LEAF off to family and friends, they’re surprised that the car is so quiet and rides so well. The LEAF does everything we need day-to-day, and given the financial savings, I don’t know why we’d buy another gas car.”

Electric vehicle ownership has taken hold at Gateway Church, where both Todd and Lisa work, after an executive pastor did the math and decided to buy a Nissan LEAF. Now, more than 20 employees are in the fold, jokingly referring to themselves as the “Blessed LEAFs Club.”

Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston are among 10 launch markets for “No Charge to Charge,” a new promotion that provides two years of no-cost public charging to new LEAF buyers who took delivery of their car after April 1, 2014. The national promotion is modeled after a successful pilot program launched in Dallas and Houston last fall with Houston-based NRG eVgo.

“With ‘No Charge to Charge,’ the new EV tax credit and enthusiastic new owners like the Bolt family, Dallas is poised to climb the ranks of leading LEAF sales markets,” said Toby Perry, director, EV Marketing for Nissan. “Texas is a great indicator that the right mix of customer awareness and strategically placed charging can lead to rapid EV adoption, and we expect to use that model to grow our sales in markets across the U.S.”

With nearly 115,000 global sales since launch, Nissan LEAF is the world’s top-selling electric vehicle. LEAF seats up to five passengers and boasts an estimated driving range on a fully-charged battery of 84 miles and MPGe ratings of 126 city, 101 highway and 114 combined. With a starting price of less than $30,000, LEAF is competitively priced with similar gas-powered cars after applicable tax credits, while providing the benefits of lower running costs and less scheduled maintenance.

LEAF is powered by an advanced lithium-ion battery and an 80kW motor that provides a highly responsive, fun-to-drive experience. A Nissan LEAF can be charged to 80 percent of its full capacity in about 30 minutes using its available quick charge port and a quick charger. Charging at home through a 220V outlet is estimated to take approximately five hours with the 6.6 kW onboard charger (approximately eight hours with the S grade’s standard 3.6 kW charger).

About Nissan North America
In North America, Nissan’s operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program and has been recognized as an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 by the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. More information on Nissan in North America and the complete line of Nissan and Infiniti vehicles can be found online at www.NissanUSA.com and www.InfinitiUSA.com, or visit the Americas media sites NissanNews.com and InfinitiNews.com.

About Nissan
Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan’s second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 236,000 employees globally, Nissan sold more than 4.9 million vehicles and generated revenue of 9.6 trillion yen (USD 116.16 billion) in fiscal 2012. Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of over 60 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. In 2010, Nissan introduced the Nissan LEAF, and continues to lead in zero-emission mobility. The LEAF, the first mass-market, pure-electric vehicle launched globally, is now the best-selling EV in history.

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29 responses to "50,000th Nissan LEAF Delivered In US"

  1. ggpa says:

    Great job Nissan!!!

    I hope other manufacturers take note of the vibrant EV market and introduce lots of new EV models.

  2. GeorgeS says:

    Who says the Leaf is ugly. It looks even better in this gray color.

    1. Brandon says:

      Compare the Leaf to the Model S. Its ugly.

      1. Nate says:

        As much as I’d love a Model S, I don’t think the styling is really all that impressive either.

    2. Nate says:

      I like the grey too … have some neighbors a few doors down with one in that color. However, the one in the picture looks black.

  3. David Murray says:

    I live in the Fort Worth area. It is amazing how few Leafs I see in my area compared to driving 30 minutes over to Dallas. Then I see plenty of them.

  4. RedLeafBlueLeaf says:

    Only 150,000 more to sell in the US before the tax credit expires (unless the law changes).

  5. scott franco says:

    Go Leaf.

    Good choice, the black.

    Leaf is threatening to be a monoculture here in Silicon Valley. There are six on my block. In the commuter lane this morning, I was amused to see 4 leafs, one behind the other, 3 blue with a forth black.

    The number of leafs on the road is going to have lasting consequences. Other than a wreck, they are not going to die. They are going to get sold again and again. I have already seen beater leafs, leafs in poor neighborhoods, etc.

    All this from a car that other makers claim is impossible to make a profit from.

    1. Jay Cole says:

      Black electric vehicles have more range and go faster … it’s science

    2. Dave R says:

      Now that LEAFs have been on the road for 3+ years, we’re going to start seeing a lot of lease returns showing up on the road which will make EV ownership a lot more accessible to a lot of people.

      1. Spec9 says:

        Yeah, I’m very interested to see how that works out. With some reasonably priced used Leafs, I think we’ll get a lot more public exposure to EVs instead of just sales to upper-middle-class suburbanites. And I think many of the more resourceful folks will seize the ability to install solar and drive for free.

        If we can get EVs to the point where they cost much less to drive than gas cars (something possible with inexpensive used EVs and self-installed solar PV), a real EV revolution may begin to take off.

        1. Nate says:

          I have solar. I have no delusions that the power I get from it lets me drive for free.

          Our total yearly production does not exceed our total yearly energy usage, even prior to getting a Volt. If the system was sized to do that, the system would need to be considerably larger. Its not free to do that.

          1. Spec9 says:

            Ugh. People take ‘free’ so literally. OK, not free . . . just extremely cheap. Note that I was talking about self-installed solar. Self-installed solar can provide electricity at around six cents per KWH. So that’s like $250/year in fuel costs for driving 12,000 miles a year.

      2. KC Red LEAFer says:

        I bought a 2012 off-lease for under $20K with 12 bars (89% battery health per LEAF Spy), so I’m part of that next wave. With a <20 mile commute and solar-based charging at work, this will do me until the LEAF 2.0 comes out for the 2017 model year. Love my LEAF!

        1. Spec9 says:

          Nice! I presume charging is free at work too so you are basically paying nothing for fuel.

          And if you trade up in 2017, someone else will pick up your current Leaf for an even lower price.

          1. Ocean Railroader says:

            I’m planning on buying a used electric car when they get around $8000 to $10,000 maybe ether a Mitsubishi i-Mev or a Leaf. But I have to see what kind of commute I have with the low range EV’s. In that I don’t want to put a lot of money into a 80 mile range EV.

            But if they come out with the 150 mile Leaf then I would buy it bran new in that 150 mile range is a lot less risk.

            But if I own the 80 mile leaf and the battery kicks the bucket on it but they have the 150 mile batteries at I will replace it for a more energy dense battery.

  6. Josh says:

    Nissan deserves a good round of applause for the effort on US sales. They have worked hard to promote the LEAF and build up strong markets, even outside of California.

    It was not without some hiccups along the way. They seem to have listened to the early adopters and made changes to the product (seat/steering wheel heat, leather seat option, S model, B mode, 6.6 kW charging, charge port release on the fob, etc.), and relatively fast for a company of their size.

    They still have work to do on the infrastructure side, but that isn’t from a lack of trying. They started partnering with cities even before the LEAF went on sale. Maybe they will have cracked the nut with “No Charge for Charging”. It might give the charging networks the revenue they need to justify expanding their investment.

  7. Spec9 says:

    A pastor living down in Texas. Wise choice of the 50,000th customer by Nissan. Show the people that even evangelicals living in the oil capital can appreciate the joys of driving electric.

    1. ModernMarvelFan says:

      Texas Utility has been really pushing it.

      It is good to pit one powerful corporation against another.

      1. Spec9 says:

        That makes sense. Texas has a lot of wind power that blows at night such that they really need more ev cars charging at night.

  8. Lad says:

    Every one of those used Leafs have one thing in common, they all will need a replacement battery. Nissan is creating a large market for a low-cost, longer-range battery. I hope they will provide upgraded batteries kits for these older models when they finally bring a better battery to market.

    1. Spec9 says:

      If Nissan doesn’t then some third party will.

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        How much do you think they will cost?

        @$200/KWh, it would cost about $5K. With mark up you would easily ask for $10K for that.

        If there are better and newer version of the LEAF, how many people would spend $5K to $10K driving a lower range and older LEAF especially considering the lower priced future packs would reduce future new LEAF price?

        1. Spec9 says:

          I have no idea. But there could be a range of prices . . . a high one for a completely new pack and much lower one for a ‘rebuilt’ pack that has had the weakest cells pulled out of it and replaced with new ones.

  9. ModernMarvelFan says:

    50K LEAF after 3.5 years of “selling”…

    That doesn’t sound exactly like a “hot item”.

    1. Mr. M says:

      If you compare it to only 180K EV sold in those 3.5 years. The 50K is a lot. This means nearly every third EV sold is a Leaf! 😉

  10. Leaf says:

    Restyle it, add range and power and they will sell the next 50,000 in 1 year

    1. RichardC says:

      Agreed. I would be very interested in purchasing a Leaf, but they need at least these 3 improvements before I’m interested.
      Better styling
      150+ mile range
      Better torque (something like the Volt)

  11. KeithEVDriverAtlanta says:

    It’s a shame though that Texas is so against Tesla and the direct sales model they use and will not allow Tesla to sell their cars.

    We own 2 2013 LEAF’s and love driving all electric. The last time we drove our ICE vehicle was more than 5 months ago. The only thing standing in the way of EV vehicle adoption on a broader scale is lack of DCQC infrastructure and the minimal range that is currently available on the LEAF. When Nissan releases the LEAF with a 150 mile range watch what happens to the EV market.