2014 Paris Motor Show: Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

3 years ago by Mark Kane 14

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S finally reached the stage at theĀ 2014 Paris Motor Show.

First glimpses at images led to positive feelings on the new look – especially the new front compared to the standard Outlander PHEV.

After including a beautiful model, the results are even better.

Hopefully, the new Concept-S will not be a concept for too long (put it into production Mitsubishi) and will help to leverage plug-in sales to higher levels.

As there is nothing new in the drivetrain and battery pack, let’s just focus on the photos from Paris.

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S

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14 responses to "2014 Paris Motor Show: Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Concept-S"

  1. Maciej Bialy says:

    Nice upgrade from the current Outlander which in its present form was too conservative! Would love to see perhaps 2nd gen Lithium ion chemistry for perhaps even more electric range, perhaps they could hit 40 or even 50 miles with better energy density. I’m definitely keeping an eye on this one!

  2. Kubel says:

    Looks like a rip off of the Ford Edge from the front, but a welcomed style change over the current Outlander- which looks incredibly boring.

    Volt is to Model S as Outlander PHEV is to Model X. They better get it to the US quickly. If they can, I think they will sell quite a few of them. But I fear Mitsubishi will be going the way of Suzuki if they can’t carve out their piece of the market soon.

  3. James says:

    In the ice age it’s taken for Mitsu to get around to bringing this car Stateside, we can at least count on the bugs being worked out. This car hits the bullseye for what Americans seem to want. Headroom, big inside – yet lacking that important third row – something the USA version really should have.

    Kudos to Mitsu for the concept’s design upgrades! This makes the former Outlander’s bland design look more special – and if they can keep the price down from $50,000, they’ll sell quite well here.

    20 miles AER is better than nothing, but the price will make or break this offering. Keep it well below Model X and it will soar. Give it the nice new front and rear fascias and upgraded interior.

    I think Mitsubishi has a winner here, for sure.

  4. DaveMart says:

    The Outlander PHEV will not get a 3rd row of seats as that is where the battery pack goes.

    Mitsubishi’s electrification program does not stop with the Outlander though:

    ‘Mitsubishi’s entire range over the next five years will grow to include an electric or plug-in hybrid electric version, according to Bradley. Next year the firm will launch a new pick-up truck and in 2016 will launch a second generation version of the ASX crossover’

    http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/paris-motor-show/mitsubishi-evo-be-replaced-high-performance-hybrid-suv

    Of direct interest to the point made is the Shogun, as that is the bigger vehicle so whenever that gets a new model and the PHEV treatment should be the one to get the third row.

    For many American’s the PHEV pick-up might be the exciting one though!

    Flyover has not been great for electrification so far, but a well executed PHEV pick-up might make a difference presumably.

    1. JRMW says:

      It’ll be interesting to see if it is an SUV or pickup that grts the Midwestern EV ball rolling. My guess is it’ll be the SUV depending on one fact I don’t know. Can EVs and PHEVs tow as well as Diesel and Regular ICE? If not an EV or PHEV pickup won’t do well.

      The SUV vs Pickup demographic is very different.
      SUVs are sold mainly as a passenger vehicle. Buyers would be willing to go electric given all the advantages over ICE. Also many urban Midwesterners are left leaning.

      Pickup drivers often use this trucks for towing. Fishing boats. Jet Ski. Trailers. Also use them for heavy work. They look at towing capacity more than 0-60 stats. They won’t switch if towing is compromised. They also TEND to be in more conservative areas and aren’t convinced of pro EV articles.
      They also want BIG. (Ford F150 size).

      An extreme example that’s southern and NOT Midwestern are those guys that roll coal. But although Midwesterners aren’t that extreme they lean in that direction.

      Now if towing with electric is BETTER than ICE and Mitsubishi can make an affordable F150 sized truck then all bets are off and PHEV pickup have a chance.

      1. JRMW says:

        Pro EV arguments.
        Sorry. Small phone. Fat fingers. Small brain. And stupid auto correct. A bad combination especially with no edit ability.

      2. DaveMart says:

        The Outlander PHEV has 500lbs less towing capacity than the diesel.

        I doubt that was something that they were optimising for though, so that is not to say that they could not give the pick-up more grunt.

        1. DaveMart says:

          I assume that US pick-ups use petrol instead of the diesel we use for the job in Europe, and which I am comparing the PHEV against.

          I would imagine although I don’t know that the petrol versions might have less towing capacity than diesel.

          1. DaveMart says:

            Yeah, the petrol Outlander also loses 500lbs of unbraked towing capacity compared to the diesel, so only does the same as the PHEV at 1500 lbs:
            http://www.mitsubishi-cars.co.uk/outlander/specifications.aspx

            So if pick-ups in the US are petrol not diesel, towing capacity should not suffer.

    2. ydnas7 says:

      the Li-ion pack is fore of the petrol tank, which is fore of the rear axle. its far away from the boot.

      but the 12v Pb battery was moved to the boot, + some other electronics. Its actually quite discrete unlike the charger in early leafs, but still, it made factory 3rd row seats unworkable.

      nice car to drive, pedestrian warning sound reminds me of an electric elevator starting.

  5. JRMW says:

    As many know I’ve been drooling over this car for a long time. I think the upgrade looks fantastic. They basically Xeroxed Lexus’ “X” front, but I like the look. Don’t love the wraparound red tail light but it’s fine.

    l mostly intrigued by this auto because it will be the first affordable AWD PHEV on the market. Add in that it is an SUV (one of the most popular body styles) and I think it has the potential to be a major seller as long as Mitsubishi keeps the price in check. I foresee pricing of $45k to $52.5k before incentives. If they can get it under that I’d be surprised but ecstatic. If thye get too close to $60k they’ll have problems competing with the AWD Model S. (I think the X will be more expensive than people expect)

    If the Outlander sells poorly I will be sad because it will destroy one of my major hypothesis for the slow adoption rate of PHEV (that the OEMs aren’t making the right types of EVs)

    So far every EV has had at least one major flaw that limits sales. The LEAF is so ugly. The Volt is a Chevy and was poorly marketed. The i3 has those skinny tires and may be too odd looking. Tesla’s price. MiEV is a micro car. Can’t find Fords anywhere. PiP was expensive and has minimal AER. Porsche price.

    But now we are getting cars that don’t suffer major flaws. Mercedes. VW eGolf. Outlander. They have minor flaws. (Mostly unimpressive range). And Gen II LEAF and Volt will be exciting as well as high priced Porsche (which won’t sell well IMO) and X (which will).

    I think critical mass is when we get PHEVs with 80-120 AER and EVs with 200 AER.

  6. Alan says:

    Went to look at the PHEV a couple of days ago as need to order new vehicle in Jan, a very nice car but once the 25 mile (real world) EV range is done, the car gives around 40m mpg making the overall mpg around 55-60 after Electricity costs and not 148mpge as stated.

    In short, they need to produce PHEV’s with a proper EV range of around 120 miles or they will never take off in large numbers IMO.

    1. DaveMart says:

      Misubishi make perfectly clear that for drivers wishing to go on long runs much of the time their diesel is a better choice, and caution against taking too much notice of the government mpg ratings.

      A PHEV loses much of its mileage advantage after the battery runs low.

      What did you expect?

      I would like a magic battery too.
      Since the weight and cost of the battery pack needed for a PHEV with 120 miles of AER are currently entirely implausible, I make do with real world comparisons, not fantasy one.

      The Mitsubishi PHEV is already a very popular choice in the countries where it is available.

  7. Evmeerkat says:

    This design uograde is much welcome. While the idea of a “green”/conscious 4×4 was really appealing the dry design left something more to be desired.

    Hopefully this would be the answer. So far its reported there is not major tech changes, so likely same 2L/(I’m good with the current spec) but… I do hope for better chemistry for the battery. 30miles is not all that exciting.40-50 real world use and I will sign up.

    Will look forward to the test drive, for sure. Very exciting potential. Let’s see the price list!

    @evmeerkat
    Evmeerkat.com